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er340790
9th Sep 2013, 14:05
Well, after a great weekend at the lake with plenty of wine, I was well over 9/10 last night. However, today it is raining so maybe 6/10.....

These scores are probably not far off the mark, but it is interesting that money is less of a factor than many might believe.

Those looking for greater happiness and satisfaction in life should head to northern Europe, but steer clear of Egypt and countries worst hit by the eurozone crisis, according to the 2013 World Happiness Report released Monday by Columbia University's Earth Institute.

Denmark, Norway, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Sweden are the world's happiest countries, according to the survey of 156 countries. Rwanda, Burundi, the Central African Republic, Benin and Togo -- all nations in Sub-Saharan Africa -- are the least satisfied with their lives, the report said.

The United States came in at number 17 in the world in terms of overall happiness, but it still lags behind Canada (6), Australia (10), Israel (11) the United Arab Emirates (14) and Mexico (16), according to the Earth Institute.

The report ranks the United Kingdom as the 22nd happiest country in the world. Other major nations included Germany (26), Japan (43), Russia (68) and China (93).

Life's ups and downs

The global survey was conducted between 2010 and 2012 and follows the Earth Institute's first rankings released last year. While "the world has become a slightly happier and more generous place over the past five years," economic and political upheavals have resulted in greatly reduced levels of well being for some nations, the report said.

Rankings for Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain fell dramatically because of the impact of the eurozone crisis, while Egypt, Myanmar and Saudi Arabia registered large falls in the wake of recent political and civil turmoil.

Egypt had the greatest fall in happiness levels. On a scale of 1 to 10 -- with 10 rated as happiest -- Egypt averaged 4.3 in 2012, compared to 5.4 in 2007.

"We expect, and find, that these losses are far greater than would follow simply from lower incomes," the report said, noting that the greatest single factor reducing happiness levels in these countries was a reduction in people's perceived "freedom to make key life choices."

Angola, Zimbabwe and Albania experienced the largest increases across all the countries surveyed.

"On a regional basis, by far the largest gains in life evaluations in terms of the prevalence and size of the increases have been in Latin America and the Caribbean, and in Sub-Saharan Africa", the report said. Reduced levels of corruption also contributed to the rise.

Governments seeking to improve the happiness of their populations should spend a higher proportion of their health budgets on mental illness, which is the single biggest "determinant of misery" in countries assessed, the study authors said.

"People can be unhappy for many reasons -- from poverty to unemployment to family breakdown to physical illness," the report said. "But in any particular society, chronic mental illness is a highly influential cause of misery.

"If we want a happier world, we need a completely new deal on mental health."

Gross National Happiness

The 2013 World Happiness Report comes on the back of a growing global movement calling for governments and policy makers to reduce their emphasis on achieving economic growth and focus on policies that can improve people's overall well-being.

An idea first proposed in 1972 by Bhutan's former King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, the concept of "happiness economics" has now gained traction in many countries across the world, including the UK, Germany and South Korea. The UN first encouraged member countries to measure and use the happiness of their people to guide public policies in July 2011.

"It is important to balance economic measures of societal progress with measures of subjective well-being to ensure that economic progress leads to broad improvements across life domains, not just greater economic capacity," the report said.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 14:13
Mexico rotten by the mafia and drug (when this is not by junk food, Mexico being the country with the most obese in the world!) and Israel surrounded by their enemies (not to mention wars and terrorism) among the happiest countries in the world? This survey is [email protected]

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 14:26
I don't believe a complex human being with different culture around the world can answer accurately to the answer: "are you happy?"

I believe in hard numbers, those cannot lie, life expectancy gives the most accurate idea of people who want to live, hence are rather happy in their life and take care of themselves:

1 Japan 82.6
2 Hong Kong (PRC) 82.2
3 Iceland 81.8
4 Switzerland 81.7
5 Australia 81.2
6 Spain 80.9
7 Sweden 80.9
8 Israel 80.7
9 Macau (PRC) 80.7
10 France (metropolitan) 80.7

My bad: Israel in on the list.
Mexico however...

MagnusP
9th Sep 2013, 14:36
life expectancy gives the most accurate idea of people who want to live
So people living in war-, drough- or famine-ravaged countries wouldn't prefer to live? Odd concept.

Matari
9th Sep 2013, 14:37
Well, going by national suicide rates, more people off themselves in France (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_suicide_rate) than in US and Mexico. (France ranks 26, US 33, and Mexico 77).

Hey KAG, ever had Tacos de Trompo from a street vendor in Mexico? OK, it's not liver paste made from a goose stuffed till it explodes, but they're still heavenly.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 14:48
MagnusP:So people living in war-, drough- or famine-ravaged countries wouldn't prefer to live? Odd concept. I agree, the people you mention are unfortunate and it is not fair... Well, a good reason not to be happy hey? ;)

Matari: According to the U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), 32.8 percent of Mexican citizens are considered obese:eek::eek::eek:

There is something worse we are doing to our goose: we cut them bleeding to death and we eat them :{

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 14:52
Matari: suicide rate: they are already taken into account in the life expectancy numbers, you cannot count them twice. More people want to live and take care of their health than to die in France. Life expectancy proves it.

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 14:53
KAG,

What you may buy to eat in KFC is not chicken. It could be pigeon, it could be rat or it could be something else entirely.

What is a given, however, is that the stuff one buys at KFC is more appropriately known as: Mystery Meat.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
9th Sep 2013, 15:04
KAG - I don't think life expectancy differences of 0.6 years make a very good measure. Happiness is much more about what you do with those years. The difference between living and just existing, if you will.

You could also take data on how much people help others, e.g.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AonYZs4MzlZbdHEtRUY3dllDZEI4RnFtR1A1NmpZUmc&hl=en#gid=0

I'm very happy where I am, thanks!:)

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 15:09
rgbroke1: well now that explains many things then, the taste to start with it ;)

Concerning the goose: honestly this is funny. Let's imagine the goose are human for a minute.
What would be worse: torturing somebody by forcing him to eat until he becomes obese, or cutting its throat and eating him? In the first case you would have a few years (most probabely few months) of jail, in the second case death penalty. But when it come to goose this is the opposite... This politically correctness with animals is just ridiculous.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 15:12
Fox: yes probabely true.
That's just the fact I don't believe obese mexicans (one third of them!) having to deal with mafia all over the country are happy. I just don't trust this survey.
I happy you're happy :ok: ;)

cattletruck
9th Sep 2013, 15:14
Is this 'happy' as in a gay on parade, or 'happy' just to have food on the table.

I think we should be told.

OFSO
9th Sep 2013, 15:17
Other major nations included Germany (26),

I asked my German friends living here in Catalunia if they'd prefer to be living in Germany. Answer was a unanimous "NO". Reasons cited were appalling weather, city crowds, crowded autobahnen, taxation (every German is still paying for unification), food (quality and price), wine (ditto), medical care and Angela Murky.

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 15:19
uh-oh, cattletruck, uh-oh. You used the "g" word. Do you have your flak jacket on? You will probably need it real soon. :}

OFSO:

I noted that the unhappy Germans living in Spanish whom you spoke with left "Bier" off the list of dislikes. Which is not surprising.

However, the list contains wine. I'm surprised because I had the privilege to drink many a fine, white, German wine. (Riesling, Spaetleser, Ausleser, Eiswein, etc.) I've always considered German white wine some of the best available. No?

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 15:25
Fox: You could also take data on how much people help others, e.g.Your list doesn't take into account what tax people give to help other people. You want to compete with France?
Okay, let's set the record straight: a familly with 3 kids who doesn't work AT ALL in France will have around $2500 a month, most part of the renting paid, free schooling, free university and a small pension for the students (around $300 a month) plus complete free health care that includes everything and ALL OF THAT for ALL the MEMBERS OF THE FAMILLY, and WITHOUT LIMITATION IN TIME (until death) as far as they won't work. Can you beat that? That's why in your list you find countries like Sierra Leone or Sri Lanka but not France. In France we don't need to do as much charity as in some other countries, we already pay the social services enough.

MagnusP
9th Sep 2013, 15:31
Bet the taxpayers are REAL happy about that. No wonder they top themselves.

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 15:34
Different things make different people feel happy. Cultural, religous (another way of saying psycho cultural) etc. factors all come into play and may vary from culture to culture, society to society.

It is preposterous to denote an arbitary set of indicators to 'measure' the happiness of a nation. While it might be noted that a country's stability, both economic and financial, is likely to provide a sound basis for its citizens to achieve some sort of happiness, such factors don't still don't tell us that people are actually 'happy' (whatever that means).

I mean what does happy actually mean to different PPRuNers? I am sure we can all agree on things that might make us unhappy but not always on the true meaning (if there is one) of happiness?

The Beatles-Happiness is a Warm Gun Lyrics - YouTube

Caco

Edited to say - that I couldn't resist the video, it makes me happy and yet many others quite the reverse which in turn makes me less happy and so on... ;)

cattletruck
9th Sep 2013, 15:36
rgb, just trying to cover the spectrum of happiness.

If the g-word people can't take a joke and find it all too much then I'm sure they would be happy to sit on this:

http://www.airrifle.co.za/customavatars/avatar1932_4.gif

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 15:38
cattletruck:

They can sit on a strand of barbed-wire? :confused:

Wouldn't that, like, hurt? :}:ok::eek:

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 15:41
MagnusP:Bet the taxpayers are REAL happy about that. Haha... Yes I don't think they are. They voted Hollande though, not the best choice to make a change on this aspect... In our culture the State (understand government) has to provide for us. It should be more balanced: a bit more charity, a bit less State help would be better... Some men from North Africa are coming to France and get pregnant several women with many kids, then at the end of each months get money from all those women (officially all single parent, jackpot $$$) themselves getting it from the social services. True. I am kidding you not. Yes this is sick.


No wonder they top themselves.Easy there...

cattletruck
9th Sep 2013, 15:42
rgb, only through experiencing pain will one find the meaning of true happiness.

500N
9th Sep 2013, 15:43
KAG

What you describe sounds like Australia.

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 15:43
They can sit on a strand of barbed-wire?

Wearing the equivalent of barbed wire makes some people feel virtuous and therefore happier, like Opus Dei...

Cilice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cilice)


Caco

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 15:47
500N: yes, the difference being that in Australia you have a better immigration (understand more educated and more willing to work) that doesn't take advantage of it as much as the immigration we have in France. Lucky you.

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 15:52
Caco:

I've read many a thing about Opus Dei. All of which were rather frightening.

PS: Mel Gibson, the actor, was/is a member of Opus Dei.

lomapaseo
9th Sep 2013, 15:54
I always thought happiness was eat drink and screw.

Nothing to do with how long you can do it.

stoopid polls

course I was intrigued about the concept of going around beating your self on the head with a hammer and only when you stopped did it feel good and make you happy.

I think that they should re-do the poll against different criteria like the ability to start and stop happiness.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 15:55
Caco: Wearing the equivalent of barbed wire makes some people feel virtuous and therefore happier, like Opus Dei...

Cilice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Caco You are so twisted ;)

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 15:56
Mel Gibson, the actor, was/is a member of Opus Dei.

So it is rumoured. I know somebody who clearly is a member but they don't tend to advertise the fact.

So was this chap...

Robert Hanssen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hanssen)

Caco

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 16:01
You are so twisted http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif

Ah, but my son it is better to be twisted than unhappy... ;)


http://www.publimetro.cl/_internal/gxml!0/r0dc21o2f3vste5s7ezej9x3a10rp3w$jh7ccm178z4mpzjqv79t2hqur22s hqi/cilice.jpeg

Caco

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 16:01
lomapaseo: I always thought happiness was eat drink and screw.My humble experience on that matter, "screwing", tells me that this is not "screwing" that will make your day, but more who you are "screwing" (I don't really like this word). Really. Some women will drive you crazy, some others not that much.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 16:04
Actually I do have a question about that: is happiness that important? It seems to be the ultimate goal to reach, but what if it wasn't? Sometimes I feel happiness make us a bit dumb.

BenThere
9th Sep 2013, 16:05
Circumstances vary. You can be happy in Bangladesh and you can be miserable in Monaco.

There are millions and millions of Americans my age, who were given a country and lifestyle that was the envy of the world yet could not be happy, and they incessantly try to impose their misery on the rest of us.

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 16:06
Sometimes I feel happiness make us a bit dumb.

But given your sensible abstemious ways never fat eh KAG? :ok:

But you are are right methinks, the less one thinks the happier that person is and the more unhappy those around them are...

Caco

500N
9th Sep 2013, 16:08
Caco

Please leave photos of RGB out of it. He is trying to keep it a secret !

PTT
9th Sep 2013, 16:08
@ KAG
I don't believe a complex human being with different culture around the world can answer accurately to the answer: "are you happy?"

I believe in hard numbers, those cannot lie, life expectancy gives the most accurate idea of people who want to live, hence are rather happy in their life and take care of themselvesFor someone who believes in hard numbers you've certainly picked a completely random one to measure something with which to measure something which is yet to be shown to be related in any way. Even if there is a correlation between the two (which is your entire argument and is without evidence) then that does not mean that one causes the other. Where on earth did you learn statistics? :=

PS - the question "how happy are you?" can indeed be measured and compared between groups (relative, rather than absolute, scores being the relevant point here), even accounting for natural tendencies to choose certain numbers.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 16:14
BenThere: very good point. Happiness kills happiness it seems. You need a challenge to be happy, and a difficult life could be a challenge and give you hope for happiness, this hope alone could be even named happiness (confusion?) by some people, while boredom could be felt instead of satisfaction in a nice environment, human being is really twisted Caco hey?

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 16:18
PTT: I admit life expectancy does not match perfectly happiness, you are right. Life expectancy depends on so many factors. I still don't trust this survey though. Why asking people if they are happy if we are not even sure they know what happiness means?

If I am given the choice I prefer living in Italy where I will be "happier" than in Mexico. But the survey tells me the opposite :ugh:

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 16:19
PS - the question "how happy are you?" can indeed be measured and comparedn between groups (relative, rather than absolute, scores being the relevant point here), even accounting for natural tendencies to choose certain numbers.

Trust a statistician to miss the philosophical or, dare I say it, the spiritual essence of the argument, in the search for empiricism... ;)

Who defines the measures for those hard numbers...?

Ultimately happiness is ephermeral and trying to measure it is like looking for the crock at the end of the rainbow.

Ben There sums it up well from a cultural perspective.

Caco

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 16:26
loma wrote:

I always thought happiness was eat drink and screw.

And? What else is there to life other than those three things?

PTT
9th Sep 2013, 16:28
@ KAGWhy asking people if they are happy if we are not even sure they know what happiness means?We are all made happy by different things, but we all know what personal happiness is - even that changes over time, so any such question is always a snapshot. We don't need to know what they mean by them being happy, only that they are.

@ CacoWho defines the measures for those hard numbers...?They are relative, so a number from 1 to 10 is a reasonable measure. If the sample size is large enough and the question meaning is the same in the different languages, and any tendency of the individual national samples to choose particular numbers for certain meanings is taken into account then the relative measures may well be meaningful.

Five minutes of thought makes me think that I would base the survey around two questions:
1. You watch a movie which you think is average and you decide to review it. On a scale of 1 to 10 what mark do you give it?
2. On a scale of 1 to 10 how happy do you consider yourself to be?

Ask them in that order but separated by a bunch of unrelated questions and you can not only measure and compare the distribution of scores, but you can adjust them for what people within any one sample consider "average".

cattletruck
9th Sep 2013, 16:30
rgb, for true happiness it should be eat, drink then screw.

PTT
9th Sep 2013, 16:30
@ rgbrock1

Conan, what is best in life? - YouTube

:ok:

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 16:32
but we all know what personal happiness is

Do we?

PTT, you really are an actuary aren't you... :ok:


Caco

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 16:34
rgbrock1:And? What else is there to life other than those three things?The pleasure (happiness?) to master a field: flying, mathematics, sculpture, painting... Those fields can give you intense happiness too. But you already knew that right...
I am sure that if you ask some mathematicians: are you happy? They will answer you "not necessarily" but might actually enjoy themselves so much for being able to understand a bit more than average the world an the universe.

BenThere
9th Sep 2013, 16:39
What else is there to life other than those three things?

There is so much more - helping others, stretching yourself to your limits, providing for your family, watching the next generation grow up, growing the perfect tomato, et al, et al.

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 16:44
The ineffable nature of happiness...

The happiest I have ever felt was when coming over a pass on my bike many years ago when I saw a large baboon spider sitting in its web at sunset. For some inexplicable reason I enjoyed an almost religious revelation and felt an immense sense of joy as I watched that strange creature at one in its own very different world. I was young, poor and devoid of any stimulant but I felt as happy as I have ever been.

Measure that you geometers...?

Caco

BlankBox
9th Sep 2013, 16:50
I am from CANADA...and every day I start off with....

If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands (clap clap)
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands (clap clap)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands. (clap clap)

If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet (stomp stomp)
If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet (stomp stomp)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet. (stomp stomp)

If you're happy and you know it, shout "Hurray!" (hoo-ray!)
If you're happy and you know it, shout "Hurray!" (hoo-ray!)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it, shout "Hurray!" (hoo-ray!)

If you're happy and you know it, do all three (clap-clap, stomp-stomp, hoo-ray!)
If you're happy and you know it, do all three (clap-clap, stomp-stomp, hoo-ray!)
If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it
If you're happy and you know it, do all three. (clap-clap, stomp-stomp, hoo-ray!)

....then I'm so frikken tired....gotta go sleep it off....:{

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 16:50
Today I am happy: switched off the A/T, the FD, the autopilot at 10 000' and did the approach 100 percent raw data in IMC. My flying was accurate enough for me to be super happy after landing. So that is happiness???...

Matari
9th Sep 2013, 16:51
I knew an old Swedish DC-3 pilot/owner in (then) Zaire, lived in a great villa on the coast. Had a young Swedish girlfriend, both tanned and happy, living a life of hard work, brutal frustrations, quick (if shady) money, and loving every minute of it.

If you asked him about Sweden, he had nothing but contempt for the nanny state his home country had become. Lost track of him of course, and in the ensuing civil wars often wondered if his beautiful villa suffered the same fate as the Hotel Okapi. Probably.

But for a time, in that period of his life, he was a happy guy, and all the modern comforts provided by Europe's central planners had absolutely no appeal to him.

BenThere
9th Sep 2013, 16:53
True. Happiness is standing at the cockpit door and the customer says to you, "That was the nicest flight I've ever had". Of course, I hear that all the time.

lomapaseo
9th Sep 2013, 16:57
The happiest I have ever felt was when coming over a pass on my bike many years ago when I saw a large baboon spider sitting in its web at sunset. For some inexplicable reason I enjoyed an almost religious revelation and felt an immense sense of joy as I watched that strange creature at one in its own very different world. I was young, poor and devoid of any stimulant but I felt as happy as I have ever been.


and then as your face intersected the spiders web you found true bliss knowing that you had your mouth open at the time and you could feel it's last twinging spasms of life as the spider slid down your silky throat..

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 16:59
and then as your face intersected the spiders web you found true bliss knowing that you had your mouth open at the time and you could feel it's last twinging spasms of life as the spider slid down your silky throat..


I have finally 'met' a person with a sense of humour as twisted as mine and that spider's web... ;)

Caco

cattletruck
9th Sep 2013, 17:06
The survey is about collective not individual happiness. A bit like walking into a company's offices - some company's staff are a cheerful lot, others companies nurture a miserable bunch, but as individuals they all vary in what makes them happy, in fact at home they may be quite the opposite to who they are at work.

In my experience in Australia where property values have gone through the roof, everyone is happy because they like to think they are now rich. But the suburbs remain dead after 6pm. In Greece where the financial crisis is hurting, people may be spending less money but the suburban plazas are still bustling with life until 11pm.

Of course the above doesn't apply to everyone in those countries, but I can't help but think that survey is a croc of sh!t.

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 17:12
Caco: thanks for sharing.
The happiest I have ever felt was ridding my bicycle to the neighborhood village during an ending afternoon to buy some candies. I remember thinking on the way that I was feeling the world was to be discovered, and that so many adventures where waiting for me to be experienced. I remember again the sun was low on the horizon, the trees were drawing big shadows on the road to support my feeling that my future was an exciting mistery, all was possible.

The second time was in my twenties, I bought a mathematic book (I left school early in my young life and wanted to learn a bit myself) and after 3 weeks of study few hours a day I started to see relationship between numbers, I was seing them moving around in volume to make connection between them and I was clearly seing the rules attaching them together, like an illusion or a live video. It was a visual experience that gave me an intense pleasure, I felt true and pure happiness. I promised myself I would continue my studies but got busy as I was working. I will continue maybe one day...

Now that I come to think about it, and after reading the last Benthere'post, I believe I am a selfish individual as happiness implies my own experience only... Shame on me :\

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 17:17
F**k happiness. I wish to remain a miserable git until death.
That makes me happy. :ok::}

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 17:20
The survey is about collective not individual happiness.

That is true but if we follow the flawed basic assumptions that some take to such questions you will have a country that appears to a have a low score and find many happy people or vice versa and still have no real answer to what a happy person or even a collective group of happy or unhappy people is.

Personally I think such surveys while being statistically valid are about as useful as determining how many angels averagely dance on the head of a pin.

Caco

500N
9th Sep 2013, 17:23
Times I have felt the happiest is when I am miles form anywhere,
looking out over the lovely and sometimes harsh Australian landscape,
often watching the animals around the place doing what they do.

BenThere
9th Sep 2013, 17:32
I think I've felt that too, 500N, as a backpacker in the Sierra Nevada in my youth. I felt myself master of the universe, equipped to counter all obstacles, at one with nature.

I found it exquisite to live off the berries in the wilderness and fish I caught with the worms I captured, discerning edible mushrooms, 50 miles from the nearest town. For me, I think the reward was a perception of self-sufficiency in an interdependent world.

I'd rather sit on a rock in the mountains next to a free running stream, drinking a cup of campfire brewed coffee, watching my sleepy eyed wife emerge from the tent on a crisp fall morning than just about anything in the whole wide world.

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 17:36
I Feel Happy/Parody of "I Feel Pretty - YouTube

Caco

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 17:42
damn internet in China I cannot open youtube :(:(:(

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 17:44
damn internet in China I cannot open youtube http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/sowee.gifhttp://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/sowee.gifhttp://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/sowee.gif

So you see those Chinese demagogues want to make you happy by not allowing you to access the open world and this makes you unhappy. Not a happy place to be at all... :ok:

Edited to say that I guess the Chinese leaders are not demgogues because China is not a democracy and thus my pejorative term is inappropriate... :8

Caco

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 17:48
Caco: I am sure I will survive without youtube ;) Afterall I felt happy when youtube didn't even exist, I only had the minitel when I was a kid... But true this is annoying. This censorship doesn't make any sense.

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 17:51
I only had the minitel when I was a kid...

My family moved to France before the internet had become de rigeur and I remember being delighted (i.e. very happy) with the minitel when I used to visit them there. Now it is no more and neither are mom and my dad and all the sisters married to (aagh) Englishmen! :sad:

Sic transit gloria mundi...

Caco

KAG
9th Sep 2013, 17:54
Yes Caco, our past happiness is our future sadness...

Matari
9th Sep 2013, 17:57
Too bad about Youtube KAG. But you usually don't miss much...often times it's just a depressing Hells Angels video.

But Caco must have taken his estrogen tablets today; this time it's a pleasant Snow White music video.:ok:

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 18:02
this time it's a pleasant Snow White music video.

Just trying to get in touch with my feminine side Matari... :ok:

Caco

rgbrock1
9th Sep 2013, 18:06
"Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits." -- Thomas Jefferson

OR

"Perfect happiness, I believe, was never intended by the Deity to be the lot of one of his creatures in this world; but that he has very much put in our power the nearness of our approaches to it, is what I have steadfastly believed." -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Page, Jul. 15, 1763

OFSO
9th Sep 2013, 18:51
I've always considered German white wine some of the best available. No?

No.

There is not enough sun to grow decent wine in Germany, although they are working on ways to incorporate the flavour of pollution in their wine.

All joking aside, there are some good wines but they are never sold outside their district where they are grown, i.e. you always drink a local wine.

Lunch today: Chilled melon soup with slivers of Iberica ham and salmon in it, followed by pork in a piquant chive sauce on a bed of wild rice, followed by baked apples stuffed with a home-made cream sauce. Three glasses of an excellent superior wine, coffees. Served by a friendly boy from S. America, sitting outside in the main square in Girona. Cost 25 - oh and that was the total bill for two.

And that's why KAG is correct: healthy food here - and cheap.

OFSO
9th Sep 2013, 18:53
Sic transit gloria mundi...

i.e., don't worry if you get sick in transit because you'll be seeing Gloria on Monday. Always wondered who Gloria is and why you have to wait until after the weekend !

Cacophonix
9th Sep 2013, 18:57
Lunch today: Chilled melon soup with slivers of Iberica ham and salmon in it, followed by pork in a piquant chive sauce on a bed of wild rice, followed by baked apples stuffed with a home-made cream sauce. Three glasses of an excellent superior wine, coffees. Served by a friendly boy from S. America, sitting outside in the main square in Girona. Cost 25 - oh and that was the total bill for two.

Lunch today... Piece of brown toast lightly buttered, anointed with fried onion and baked beans al fresco... Rain and mist hid the end of the field outside while dog lay shivering next to me... All this washed down with a cup of tea and and a chicken's foot and water for the dog.

Hmm, all in all dog and me think OFSO was happier today... ;)

Caco