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View Full Version : The best name for your home wifi installation


OFSO
29th Aug 2013, 10:07
On another thread, there some good ideas to put people off even attempting to hack your well-secured and firewalled wifi installation: a good name. How about:

- Server Disabled, or
- Paedeophilia Monitoring Centre, or
- Pitbull Breeder's Club

Any more suggestions ?

Ultralights
29th Aug 2013, 10:09
connect so i can download your stuff!

Fareastdriver
29th Aug 2013, 10:09
Benefit Investigation Centre.

dead_pan
29th Aug 2013, 10:10
How about PRISM, Echelon, or Bonesaw?


Posted from Pprune.org App for Android

dead_pan
29th Aug 2013, 10:12
... you could add "log on to make our life easier. Regards NSA/GCHQ"


Posted from Pprune.org App for Android

SoundBarrier
29th Aug 2013, 10:16
My favorite was "Disconnected" Especially when windows says..

"You are now connected to disconnected"
:ok:

Sallyann1234
29th Aug 2013, 10:17
You don't have to be radiating the name at all. It can be entirely anonymous, which adds a further level of security.

Libertine Winno
29th Aug 2013, 10:19
Not strictly what you were asking, but one of the best I saw was 'Pretty fly for a wifi'! Made me chuckle...

A A Gruntpuddock
29th Aug 2013, 10:22
If I run 'inssider', the local police hq appears, even though it is nearly 1km away.

Always wondered if that was genuine!

cattletruck
29th Aug 2013, 10:41
infected
eavesdropper
malware
trojan
keyreader

That'll scare 'em away.

zarniwoop
29th Aug 2013, 11:42
get orf moy LAN

Inspired by a username on another forum I use.

MagnusP
29th Aug 2013, 12:01
A simple gotcha should suffice.

SpringHeeledJack
29th Aug 2013, 12:03
A female of one's retinue recounted to me that as she was walking to her local station with the phone wifi on and showing on the screen she came across "My neighbour's sexy wife"........Whilst we're discussing all things wifi, it was brought to my attention that more and more wifi 'sniffers' are being installed by companies/local authorities etc to snoop on the populace's movements and perhaps even their information. Latest location....inside rubbish bins in certain areas :suspect:



SHJ

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 12:10
NSA Center.

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 12:11
Sallyann wrote:

You don't have to be radiating the name at all. It can be entirely anonymous, which adds a further level of security.

That's known as being 'hidden'!!! :}

FullOppositeRudder
29th Aug 2013, 12:16
One SSID on the other side of my village makes the owner's intention very clear:

F**KOFF

(insert such letters as are needed for correct interpretation)

mikedreamer787
29th Aug 2013, 12:31
C: \ My Virus Bottle\My Contained Viruses\Viruses\Keyreader

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 12:32
mikedreamer:

You beat me to it because I was going to use

Computer Virus Central

as an SSID name!

Ken Borough
29th Aug 2013, 12:36
A neighbour uses 'pirate'.

When I asked him if he'd been hacked, he replied somewhat innocently "No, that was the name of my dog.". Shut me up, real quick!

txdmy1
29th Aug 2013, 13:25
Area 52 ....

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 13:27
You don't have to be radiating the name at all. It can be entirely anonymous, which adds a further level of security.

Utter load of bull excrement.

Doing that :
(a) Doesn't make it anonymous
(b) Doesn't hide it
(c) Doesn't add to your security

Its about as useful as running your WiFi unencrypted or with WEP encryption which is equivalent to running unencrypted. WPA2-PSK is the best for your average punter, although if you can manage it, certificate based security is what you should be aiming for if you're really serious about WiFi security.

VP959
29th Aug 2013, 13:54
Its about as useful as running your WiFi unencrypted or with WEP encryption which is equivalent to running unencrypted.

The problem being that some of us still use old wifi kit that won't run anything but WEP ....................

(my old laptop won't, for example, the only choice is nothing or WEP, which forces me to run the whole thing on WEP)

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 13:57
The problem being that some of us still use old wifi kit that won't run anything but WEP ....................

(my old laptop won't, for example, the only choice is nothing or WEP, which forces me to run the whole thing on WEP)

No excuse I'm afraid if you've got ancient kit. WPA has been around for 10 years now !

And what godforsaken old operating system are you using on your laptop ? Even the soon to be obsolete Windows XP can do WPA/WPA2.

If you're using anything before Windows XP then shame on you. You should not be using an obsolete operating system, and in particular an obsolete Windows system. The risks are pretty great, both from viruses as well as general bugs (and no, saying you are running antivirus programs is not a defence.... an AV program running on an obsolete OS is useless!).

As I said, WEP = unencrypted. WEP is a pathetically weak encryption protocol. Look it up on the internet or buy a book called Wi-Foo (published in 2004, so stuff has moved on in terms of new security risks, but it covers WEP in quite some depth).

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 14:41
mixture:

How can you state that by not broadcasting your SSID it's not hidden? Unless you know the exact name of the SSID you'll never see it nor be able to connect to it. That's kind of hidden, to me anyway.

OFSO
29th Aug 2013, 15:41
the soon to be obsolete Windows XP

Dictonary definition of obsolete: no longer in general use; fallen into disuse

Microsoft definition of obsolete: something that works perfectly well but which we will no longer support, so you mugs will all rush off and spend your money on our newest product which actually has a few bugs and will be updated as 8.1 on October 17 and we should have sacked Steve Ballmer years ago....

VP959
29th Aug 2013, 15:44
No excuse I'm afraid if you've got ancient kit. WPA has been around for 10 years now !

And what godforsaken old operating system are you using on your laptop ? Even the soon to be obsolete Windows XP can do WPA/WPA2.

If you're using anything before Windows XP then shame on you. You should not be using an obsolete operating system, and in particular an obsolete Windows system. The risks are pretty great, both from viruses as well as general bugs (and no, saying you are running antivirus programs is not a defence.... an AV program running on an obsolete OS is useless!).

As I said, WEP = unencrypted. WEP is a pathetically weak encryption protocol. Look it up on the internet or buy a book called Wi-Foo (published in 2004, so stuff has moved on in terms of new security risks, but it covers WEP in quite some depth).

It's running XP Pro, but the issue is that the hardware doesn't seem to support anything other than WEP. There isn't an option to select WPA in the wifi setup AFAICS.

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 15:46
VP959:

So the question for you should really be not about which OS version you're running but on what box/PC/hardware. :ok:

ice2x01
29th Aug 2013, 15:52
I second 'Pretty fly for a wifi'.. best one I've seen

VP959
29th Aug 2013, 16:04
VP959:

So the question for you should really be not about which OS version you're running but on what box/PC/hardware.

Yes, that seems to be the problem. It's an old Benq laptop, but still works perfectly well so I'm reluctant to just throw it out because of the wifi only being able to run WEP. The snag is it forces me to run the whole house as WEP.

AFAIK you can't change the hardware in laptops, so I'm stuck with it, I think.

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 16:14
VP959:

The problem is with the Benq's wifi card which, obviously, supports nothing other than WEP. (To the detriment of the other devices in your household.)

One solution to that problem would be to disable the wifi adapter in the Benq and replace it with a rather inexpensive USB connected wifi card!

Sallyann1234
29th Aug 2013, 16:38
Let's be straight about this.
If you really want to be totally secure from professional eavesdropping, you don't use wireless at all, you stick to cables - well-screened ones.

WPA2 with a good random passcode is good enough for all but the most sensitive users, since it takes a lot of work to break and there is no incentive for anyone to put that much effort into hacking your average domestic or small business network.

And yes WEP is relatively simple to break, a nice bit of fun for any amateur hacker.

For any encryption method, not broadcasting the server name doesn't hide the network - it's still there for any scanner to see. But it is one extra hurdle for the hacker to cross.

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 16:42
Sallyann:

I'm almost certain that if you do not broadcast the SSID of a wireless router then, yes, the network is still there but it remains invisible/hidden to anyone and in order to connect to that wireless router then the SSID name must be known beforehand.

No?

Ozzy
29th Aug 2013, 17:30
HardDriveReader

Ozzy

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 17:45
How can you state that by not broadcasting your SSID it's not hidden? Unless you know the exact name of the SSID you'll never see it nor be able to connect to it. That's kind of hidden, to me anyway.

How can I state it ? Well, because its a fact based on the way the protocol works. :E

All 802.11 based wifi networks, irrespective of encryption status will, at various times need to send unencrypted data frames. A common example is the "association frame" which is what a computer emits when it wants to join a wifi network, amongst the contents of that frame is the SSID. Other ways of generating an unencrypted frame include probe requests which the network will reply to.

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 17:46
thanks for the clarification mixture, I did not know that.

I guess that's one of the reasons i remain a systems engineer on mainframes!!!!

Sallyann1234
29th Aug 2013, 17:51
Exactly as I said, it's one extra step. The hacker has to find that frame and identify the ID.

radeng
29th Aug 2013, 17:54
I guess I'm fortunate enough to live far enough away from anybody else that no other WiFi networks can be detected!

Back in the early to mid 1990s, the BIG WLAN requirement was range. 1 or 2MB/s, but 100 or even 200 metre range. So the early 802.11 was designed for just that............I chaired one of the 802.11 sub committees at the time. Then all of a sudden, marketing guys discovered they'd got it wrong and speed was needed while ranges of 10 - 20 metres were adequate.....

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 17:54
Exactly as I said, it's one extra step. The hacker has to find that frame and identify the ID.

Yes dear. That can be done with point and click user friendly tools.

Doesn't take much effort on their part.

Take a look on YouTube, many videos on there showing how quick and easy it is.

Sallyann1234
29th Aug 2013, 17:56
Thank you darling.

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 17:57
thanks for the clarification mixture, I did not know that.

No worries.

I remember being shown around a Cray super computer by a proud sysadmin one day who just took delivery of his new baby a couple of days prior. I'm sure your mainframe job comes with many complexities of its own that I wouldn't know where to start with !

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 18:00
Like radeng, the Mrs. and I live an extremely rural area of The Great Satanic State of Connecticrap. (Affectionately referred to as Connect-The-Crap.) Our nearest neighbor is about 1/2 mile down the road. And she's usually so crocked on her daily ration of "stupid juice" that she probably has no idea that the Internet, or even networking, even exists.

As such, my wifi router has no encryption enabled at all. I do, however, pseudo-hide the SSID.

So unless the local population of deer, bear, raccoon, possum, fox, wolf and/or eagles are in actuality an NSA plot, I feel secure enough with no security!

(Yes dear. I'll be right there as soon as I finish this post on PPRuNe. I don't know what that white van with the parabolic dish on top, and sitting in front of our house, is doing.)

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 18:01
Thank you darling.

:E

To be fair Sallyann.. there was a time, believe it or not, when I thought like you and I used to setup WiFi networks as hidden.

But then one day, reality hit, and I focused my efforts on securing the network itself and not worrying about its visibility.

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 18:04
mixture:

I work with IBM mainframes, HP OpenVMS clusters, Linux-based clusters as well as a Siemens-Nixdorf "super computer" which, in reality, is a "super-pain-in-the-ass-computer".

Each of these systems have their own inherent idiosyncrasies, some of which cause one to contemplate changing ones career field to, say, trash picker-upper. :E

G-CPTN
29th Aug 2013, 18:11
My daughter's neighbour (a retired police officer) showed her his 'computer' which he had had lying unused for many years, and asked whether it would be possible to use it for accessing the internet.

It turned out that it was an ancient CP/M machine, and daughter simply replied 'no' (as being the kindest response possible).

rgbrock1
29th Aug 2013, 18:24
Ah yes, the good ol' CP/M. Single-task operating system brought to us by Digital Research Inc. Could only make use of an 8-bit processor and the max of 64KB of memory. Started its life running on Intel 8080 processors, again 8-bit.

The last release was version 3.x back in 1983!

And, no, CP/M had no networking capabilities.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/26/CPM-86.png

MG23
29th Aug 2013, 18:31
WPA2 with a good random passcode is good enough for all but the most sensitive users, since it takes a lot of work to break and there is no incentive for anyone to put that much effort into hacking your average domestic or small business network.

I'm not aware of any way to break WPA2 other than brute force, unless you enable some insecure options; though WPA lasted a while before effective attacks were found.

Sallyann1234
29th Aug 2013, 19:37
*mixture*
To be fair Sallyann.. there was a time, believe it or not, when I thought like you and I used to setup WiFi networks as hidden.
Nowhere have I suggested that this in itself was sufficient security. I simply suggested that it was something extra that one could do.

But then one day, reality hit, and I focused my efforts on securing the network itself and not worrying about its visibility.
But it seems from this that you may once have relied on it.

I still keep my network 'hidden', as part of an overall security strategy. I also set the router to only connect the limited list of MAC codes of my own devices. Again, I'm aware that this is not infallible by itself - but it's an additional measure.

So thank you, but I do not need either your technical advice or your patronising remarks.

empacher48
29th Aug 2013, 19:39
For those here in NZ, I've changed mine to "GCSB Surveillance Van 12". Just to freak out the neighbours.

vulcanised
29th Aug 2013, 19:50
CP/M had no networking capabilities.


Ah, but we was happy then.

Sallyann1234
29th Aug 2013, 19:57
MG23
Yes, it's pretty secure and I use it with confidence. No-one is going to spend the necessary time and money to hack it on your home network or mine.

Loose rivets
29th Aug 2013, 20:14
I was in Frinton Essex, and had no internet. The library was driving us crazy, 29 mins to log in, and one minute to surf. I searched for an open connection and found one on the (slightly) famous Connaught Avenue.




Quote:
but my attempts to get on line were frustrated by not being allowed to let BT reinstate the phone. One name that came up was Rosie the Cat. By the most extraordinary chance, I had adopted that cat some years before. The owner claimed it back months later when she got back from a crisis. Anyway, it was a very rare breed, so I typed that [breed] in. Bingo, I was in!

I had some wonderful photos of the cat, and would have loved to make one appear on her computer, but hadn't the faintest how to go about it...and didn't want to get into trouble sneaking into others' computers. Shame, it would have been fun. [/QUOTE]


Now, something I've wanted to know for some time. When I was 'in', the screen suddenly started having a life of its own. Or, perhaps, an annoyed Rosie the Cat owner. What could they see? Did they know I was there, and if so, how?

B Fraser
29th Aug 2013, 20:20
I call my main one Biffin's Bridge. I should rename the other one error404.

:E

OFSO
29th Aug 2013, 20:26
Did they know I was there

On my WiMax/WiFi router page I can bring up a list of current users. Do I check it very often ? or at all ? no.

But there is so much free wifi here there's no need to hack anyone's encrypted account.

Loose rivets
29th Aug 2013, 20:46
Mmm . . . one is doomed to return to being an ordinary mortal after a BA first class trip. Comfort Inn, and pay for the wi-fi or get *******. I told them they were cheap ******** and should model themselves on American hotels, but to my astonishment, they didn't change the policy of the hotel chain. There again tomorrow, cos they don't take airmiles.

That makes no sense at all. There tomorrow cos I'm a cheap ******* and I've used all my airmiles on a first class ticket. It were grand living like that for a few hours. Sigh . . .

mixture
29th Aug 2013, 21:01
But it seems from this that you may once have relied on it.


No. All I was saying is that like you, once upon a time I was ill informed. Then someone in the office recommended I read the Wi-Foo book, which was an enlightening read.

I still keep my network 'hidden', as part of an overall security strategy. I also set the router to only connect the limited list of MAC codes of my own devices.

You're wasting your time with hidden SSID and you are wasting even more of your time with a MAC code list.

Mac the Knife
29th Aug 2013, 22:32
Lets face it, it requires a fair amount of effort to keep a determined wardriver off your network.

inSSIDer and Kismet make it (relatively) easy to crack most networks.

Even with good security someone really determined and skillful WILL get in eventually.

Few home networks have anything worth spending much time on and most baddies just wander around twisting doorknobs.

Hiding the SSID and using even pathetically crackable security like WEP is enough to keep keep casual fumblers (the majority) out, so don't discourage it - it's a little bit better than nothing at all. Just be aware that that is all that it is.

Mac

:suspect:

Hydromet
29th Aug 2013, 22:42
At present, I can see 8 nearby networks, all secured, but there is one that occasionally pops up that is unsecured. It's tempting....

A couple of years ago I accidentally landed on an unsecured system. From some of the file names, I could see the user was associated with a particular university, so at first, assumed it was the young bloke across the road, who was a student there. However, further inspection showed that it was actually the bloke two doors down from there, who was a lecturer....in computer science.:ugh:

Fortunately, he secured it when I told him what I'd seen.

Didosdadsdogsdead
30th Aug 2013, 00:06
For those here in NZ, I've changed mine to "GCSB Surveillance Van 12". Just to freak out the neighbours.Hope you don't mind if I nick that, currently mine is Hastings Free Porn HotSpot but I've had enough of cars pulling up outside with drivers trying to check it out. :)

Dak Man
30th Aug 2013, 01:02
"$110 per minute" works for me.

mixture
30th Aug 2013, 06:21
Hiding the SSID and using even pathetically crackable security like WEP is enough to keep keep casual fumblers (the majority) out, so don't discourage it

Given the SSID hiding is a checkbox and WEP is a pop-up menu option, there is every reason to discourage both.

Leaving the checkbox unticked is perfectly fine, and there is absolutely no excuse whatsoever for not selecting the WPA2-PSK option in that pop-up menu !

WPA has been around for 10 years now. Save for a few crusty old men around here, most people in the world will own kit that is less than 10 years old and therefore will work perfectly fine on WPA.

VP959
30th Aug 2013, 09:23
Save for a few crusty old men around here, most people in the world will own kit that is less than 10 years old and therefore will work perfectly fine on WPA.

Somewhat inaccurate as I'm a few years off retirement age, I'll have you know. I just don't have a burning need to replace something that works perfectly well for my limited needs, and has done since I bought it around 9 years ago.

Anyway, spurred on by all the comments here I have been digging around and have discovered an updated driver for my ancient, but venerable, laptop that has added the option of WPA2, rather than the previous options of just open or WEP. After an hour's faffing around changing the router and all the other things that connect to the wireless network (iPads, ebook readers, etc) I now have it running on WPA2.................

Loose rivets
30th Aug 2013, 09:28
People have kit that's less than 10 years old!!?? Whatever next?

mixture
30th Aug 2013, 09:41
Congratulations on joining the WPA2 world ! I meant to ask you if you'd checked for firmware/software updates !

Sorry to hear it took you an hour, but I guess most of that was waiting for the cogs on your computer to churn begrudgingly into action. :E

ManUtd1999
30th Aug 2013, 10:26
There was a case that made the news a couple of years back. A guy had changed his Wifi name to "Bet you can't hack this". A few days later he logged on to discover it had been changed to "Challenge accepted"

Mostly Harmless
31st Aug 2013, 19:15
I like this one the best.
http://thesleepygamer.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/bells-of-saint-john-wifi.jpg