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SOPS
27th Aug 2013, 09:00
Ouch!!

Marriage proposal ends in disaster when man's would-be bride clumps him round the head with a busker's ukulele | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2402511/Marriage-proposal-ends-disaster-mans-bride-clumps-round-head-buskers-ukulele.html)

mikedreamer787
27th Aug 2013, 10:06
I'm sure its a live advert for something. The train
would've quite likely veered around the camera
bloke who was taking the flick and that musician
wasn't surprised at all when she snatched his uke.

ExXB
27th Aug 2013, 11:07
Can the Mods put in some sort of filter to prevent me from inadvertently clicking through to the Daily Mail? I'm not saying they should be blocked, but I really don't want to go there.

G-CPTN
27th Aug 2013, 11:27
inadvertently clicking through to the Daily Mail?

The clue is in the text in the URL . . .

Blacksheep
27th Aug 2013, 12:01
When No.2 daughter was on a work placement with the late barrister Tony Abrahams, he advised her "In court, one should never ask a witness a question to which one doesn't already know the answer." She reckons this is the best bit of professional advice anyone has ever given her.

belfrybat
27th Aug 2013, 12:44
inadvertently clicking through to the Daily Mail?

Edit your hosts file.

ExXB
27th Aug 2013, 16:43
The clue is in the text in the URL . . .

Oops. My mistake!

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Aug 2013, 22:12
one should never ask ... a question to which one doesn't already know the answer
This advice is also useful to politicians.

Particularly if you can run it in reverse (which is often possible), ie make sure that you aren't asked a question to which you do not know the answer.

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Aug 2013, 22:14
Edit your hosts file.
Yup. Point it at this:
The Daily Mail Song - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=5eBT6OSr1TI)

Shack37
27th Aug 2013, 22:38
This advice is also useful to politicians.

Particularly if you can run it in reverse (which is often possible), ie make sure that you aren't asked a question to which you do not know the answer.


But politicians never answer the question they're asked. They invent one themselves and answer it.:ugh:

Oktas8
28th Aug 2013, 05:07
This advice is also useful to politicians.

It's good advice in all areas of life, if one wants to avoid looking like a fool. In any scenario, the more important it is that you not look like a fool, the more important the rule is.

P.S. Being a student in a classroom with an effective teacher gives you a free pass though.

P.P.S. When a teacher / manager / leader says "there are no wrong answers", be afraid. Be very afraid. There are always wrong answers. There just might be more than one right answer, which is a different thing altogether.

KAG
28th Aug 2013, 06:21
SOPS:Make sure you know the answer, before you ask the question.
Ouch!! They got you too:
The clip has since gone viral on YouTube but there is a strong suggestion it could be a publicity stunt, not in the least because the mall train bears the advertising message 'not so sweet'.

sitigeltfel
28th Aug 2013, 06:25
Viral advert for Cadburys chocolate.

lomapaseo
28th Aug 2013, 13:58
I found it funny, who cares if its fake

MagnusP
28th Aug 2013, 13:59
The IMPORTANT thing is, did the ukulele survive?

Gertrude the Wombat
28th Aug 2013, 18:01
But politicians never answer the question they're asked. They invent one themselves and answer it.
Well, the ideal is that you do indeed invent the question yourself, plant it, and then answer it as prepared. At a lunch I attended today a minister and an MP were discussing doing just that.

However one does sometimes get asked unplanted questions, and if they are serious questions (rather than just attempts by the questioner to get some media exposure for their bizarre views) then I do try to answer them properly.

Of course if I wasn't expecting the question it's entirely possible that I won't know the answer, in which case I'll say so (a luxury that council portfolio holders have but government ministers seem unable to get away with).

probes
28th Aug 2013, 19:12
I like the "Ask no questions and be told no lies." Always works. :cool:

Private jet
28th Aug 2013, 21:43
Make sure you know the answer, before you ask the question.

This is the golden rule they teach barristers on day 1 of their pupillage.

KAG
29th Aug 2013, 04:29
I found it funny, who cares if its fake I do. Not being told this is a fake is called a lie. And the ONLY reason this video arrived on pprune and other internet support is because people thought it was real.
If it's real then it is kind of funny, if not then this is boring as we have seen this scene already at the theater or at the cinema.

sitigeltfel
29th Aug 2013, 05:17
It is a tactic increasingly used by companies to get free advertising for their products. If the news outlets and consumers are gullible enough to swallow them as stories, then more fool them.

mikedreamer787
29th Aug 2013, 05:41
True sitig, but in this thread's case I don't think
anyone's gonna suddenly rush out and purchase
a bunch of cadbury chockies (although some of
our JB women might!) :p