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SoundBarrier
26th Aug 2013, 17:59
So I am making a dinner for two next week and looking for some nice ideas for something to cook.

For desert I am making home-made ice cream and frozen yoghurt.

I need a nice starter and main course - prolly chicken based but not limited to such, happy for a beef or lamb or something.

The interweb is FULL of ideas but I think I need more real experience and here on JB I know we have a range of talents from some of us who can burn water to making gourmet steak egg n chips.


So ideas anyone?

mikedreamer787
26th Aug 2013, 18:01
1. Tell her to bring beer.

2. You order in pizza.

Problem solved.

Sailor Vee
26th Aug 2013, 18:03
Give us a clue to your location, it can depend on climate as to what is appropriate to be served, I gather not vegetarian or vegans?

rgbrock1
26th Aug 2013, 18:11
Why don't you try something similar to what I came up with for the first-time meal with the Mrs.?

http://blogs.miaminewtimes.com/shortorder/banqmacheesedin.jpg

Hell, she married me anyway. (Maybe she felt sympathy for me considering my culinary skills. Or I should say, lack of culinary skills.)

PTT
26th Aug 2013, 18:27
Easiest delicious meat/potatoes/veg-based recipe I know:

Take lamb cutlets (3-4 each, appetite dependent), coat them all over in Dijon mustard then dip them in demerara sugar (any brown sugar will do, really) so that they are coated, then grill or barbecue them for 5-7 mins or so each side. The sugar should caramelize nicely and you can deliberately cook a few too many so you can check how pink you want the meat. I know this sounds silly but it's a Delia Smith (http://www.deliaonline.com/) recipe and has consistently produce the most "you made that how?" responses of anything I've made. And it's really, really simple.

Allow the lamb to rest for 2-3 mins then serve with homemade chips* and fresh vegetables (I prefer garden peas and steamed carrots julienne†, but ymmv).

* Cut potatoes into wedges and par-boil. Drizzle a baking tray in olive oil and put the wedges in. Drizzle a little more oil over the top and add liberal amounts of either salt and pepper or chilli flakes (depending on your taste). Put in the oven at 180°c for ~30 mins before turning over for another 10 mins or until browned. One large potato should be enough for 2 people to get 4-5 big chips each.

† Peeled, cut into batons and then cooked.

mixture
26th Aug 2013, 19:38
I gather not vegetarian or vegans?

Erm... he did say "prolly chicken based but not limited to such, happy for a beef or lamb or something.".

Do keep up man !!!

ExXB
26th Aug 2013, 19:47
Buy a whole chicken. Also buy one of those roasting bags (actually get two). Put the chicken in one bag, put it in the oven at 180C for 1 1/2 hours. In the other bag put in some chopped upped potatoes and carrots - add salt, pepper, olive oil, rosemary, nutmeg and garlic (to taste). Put second bag in the oven about 50 minutes before chicken is due.

You can use the leftovers for Chicken Pie adding mushroom sauce, and more potatoes/carrots as required.

;)

flying lid
26th Aug 2013, 19:50
Take her to Wigan (to view the FA and Rugby Leage cups !!!)

Taking The Wife Out For Tea WIGAN STYLE - YouTube

Lid

probes
26th Aug 2013, 20:01
season a piece of meat (or several small ones), add a little water to the pot, put it into the oven and wait. Eat when crispy. You could add potatoes, carrots or apples when it starts getting brownish, if you like. Or they do.

Little cloud
26th Aug 2013, 20:02
Cock in cider?


http://www.fullbridgerestoration.co.uk/images/projects/14/full/4.jpg

500N
26th Aug 2013, 20:11
As Probes said

Chicken is one of the easiest meats to cook (fillets) and hardest to burn
or over cook as you can tell before it happens.

Sauces are easy to make for it as well or just Gravy.

Capetonian
26th Aug 2013, 20:34
A roast chicken is easy. Take out the giblets and so on if it comes with them, lower it gently into boiling water for about 5 minutes, which will ensure no raw bits round the bones, drain it, shove some premixed Paxo stuffing (instructions on packet) up its rear end, put it onto a roasting pan, and mix up a pinch or two of salt and a sprinkling of pepper into some honey or jam, mix in a spoonful of oil (sesame is good for flavour), stir it and brush it onto the skin.

It will smell good as it cooks and therein is half the battle. Put it into the oven at about 220, after about half an hour lower it to about 180 and by the time the skin is crispy, just before it starts to look burnt, it will be done.

A small ovenproof container with a cupful of water in the oven will make the skin go crispy.

Vegetables : Open a jar of 'petit pois' and/or carrots.

And if you get your guest/s half pissed before you serve the meal they won't notice if it's not cordon bleu stuff.

Worrals in the wilds
26th Aug 2013, 21:26
Roast chicken is nice, or if you feel like something else so is Chicken Chasseur.
French recipes - chicken chasseur - Chicken Chasseur (http://www.frenchdesire.com.au/recipes/chicken-chasseur/)

It will sit on the stove until you're ready to serve, and you don't have to carve it either (the butcher will cut a whole chicken into eight if you ask them). You could do some baby boiled potatoes (put potatoes in water and boil till soft) and microwave a frozen bag of green veggies to go with it.

You can also make it with skinless chicken pieces, though it hasn't as much flavour.

SoundBarrier
26th Aug 2013, 21:30
Love the idea of that pub - wonder how she will take it!! :E

I'm in good ole noo zld. Seasonal veg is easily accessible and not too badly priced except for tomatoes - 3 arms and 2 legs per kilo.

The lamb cutlets sound really good....

Sailor Vee
26th Aug 2013, 21:34
Mixture, I was keeping up. We had guests round for dinner, the instruction from hubby was 'no peppers for madam'.

When they turned up for 'tournedos Rossini' , turned out she was a Vegan!, so worth checking out before deciding on a recipe!

500N
26th Aug 2013, 21:35
Well if you are in Noo zld and didn't serve a lamb dish :=:=:=

If I had known I wouldn't have suggested Chicken !

CoodaShooda
26th Aug 2013, 21:41
Or, if you have a wok.

Stir fry chicken breast strips in 1tsp of oil, sprinkled with copious amounts of Cajun seasoning until seasoning is blackened and the oils released. Set aside in warm oven and clean wok.

Heat another tsp of oil, stir fry 1 crushed garlic clove for 1 minute, add 1 julienned carrot and stir fry until starting to soften (3 mins?), add corn kernels sliced from half a cob and stir fry for a couple of minutes, add a couple of handfuls of shredded spinach and stir fry until wilted. (2mins?)

Pile vegetables in centre of plates and top with chicken.

Easy.

broadreach
26th Aug 2013, 21:52
YouTube on an iPad.

G-CPTN
26th Aug 2013, 21:52
As a single young man, my favourite self-made meal was grilled lamb chump chops - so easy (and so tasty).

Here is a lamb chop recipe from a tasty dish (though your taste might vary):-
BBC - Food - Recipes : Lamb cutlets with mint, chilli and golden potatoes (http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/lamb_cutlets_with_mint_16788)

Try a double-sided saddle chop (called a Barnsley chop):-
http://www.pollokwilliamson.co.uk/productImages/340/barnsley_chop.jpg

especially if the animal is young and still small (or if your appetite is larger than average)

Dushan
27th Aug 2013, 00:33
1. Tell her to bring beer.

2. You order in pizza.

Problem solved.

Since she's stopping for beer, she can stop for pizza too.

Dushan
27th Aug 2013, 00:34
Why don't you try something similar to what I came up with for the first-time meal with the Mrs.?

http://blogs.miaminewtimes.com/shortorder/banqmacheesedin.jpg

Hell, she married me anyway. (Maybe she felt sympathy for me considering my culinary skills. Or I should say, lack of culinary skills.)

She married you because yiu didn't opt for MREs. She knew she had a winner on her hands.

Airborne Aircrew
27th Aug 2013, 00:43
Dushen has it... :D:D:D

Seriously, if you have access to a BBQ use it...

For the record, BBQing has absolutely nothing to do with cooking, it's all about loving the meat... Cool and slow is the secret. I know when I and friends were young we tried to "cook" on the BBQ. We ended up with dry, often burned meat, with no flavour and a texture like DMS soles.

If you take the long route and ply the both of you with her booze of choice you will end up with a palatable meal and a happy lass...

Now comes the secret... Don't go straight for gold... Mellow out in the fuzz of the booze and the pleasantly fat tummy... Put her in the back room and wake her in the morning with good coffee... She'll love you forever for not taking advantage of her and the next date is a sure score... :E

500N
27th Aug 2013, 01:01
AA

I have to ask but surely these skills of your, both culinary and
of the opposite sex can't have been learn't as Airborne, too refined
for that so must have been the Aircrew career ? :O

Airborne Aircrew
27th Aug 2013, 01:27
It's a melding of the best of both me old fruit... That and age... Can't chase the young fillies around like I used to...:{

mikedreamer787
27th Aug 2013, 04:25
Since she's stopping for beer, she can stop for pizza too.

True Dushan, but the OP wanted to organise the cooking bit himself.

My cooking skills include boiling water without burning it and making
peanut butter sandwiches. Gordon Ramsay, the fat dude and the bald
Italian bloke would all be impressed.

500N
27th Aug 2013, 04:30
Mike

"My cooking skills include boiling water without burning it"


Well, you are ahead of others in the world who can't even do that !!!

mikedreamer787
27th Aug 2013, 04:53
The trick to boiling water is to use a ceramic pot over a gas stove.

http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/pot-boiling-water-5336969.jpg


Using a steel pot over a lecky stove is a common mistake and doesn't
give fine-tune control over the water-cooking process which results in
some water being burnt, la -

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS32wuuPH6w_CVDWU21fUBa6ueSpB-DJVgBfko-RglDsn6m-FAb https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTg9wuukGGgKzCv14KskbsBeza__w_gIfNPGvhgIKR DdXrVJwiq

500N
27th Aug 2013, 04:56
Mike

LOL, love that photo.

I wasn't actually referring to myself, just others I know.

I use gas, much better to cook on !

probes
27th Aug 2013, 05:18
md787 - :D (7 times!)
Also I've just been watching Ramsay for a couple of weeks and applied one of the hi-tech tricks of his trade yesterday - using a whisk instead of a big spoon for pancake dough :p - and can you imagine? It really worked much better!
He's got it all wrong about the ingredients, though. The egg has to be mixed with a little milk, then flour.
And peanut butter :}.

onetrack
27th Aug 2013, 05:19
The following excellent site is the repository of 26,000 recipes that cater for most "down-under" tastes. If you can't find a recipe here, you're a lost cause.

Recipes, recipes and recipes - Taste (http://www.taste.com.au/)

What I do, is do a test run of a recipe and alter any ingredients to suit my taste or likes/dislikes. I then copy and paste the original recipe into Notepad, change the ingredients or methods to my preferred version, print it out, and file it.

Here's some tricks learnt over many years of bachelorhood and tips from my dear old mum (long gone).

If a recipe has onions in it, fry them first to slight caramelisation (browning), then add the rest of the ingredients for cooking. This brings out greater flavour in the finished product.

Frying curry powder with onions before adding the remainder of the ingredients, brings out the curry flavour much better.

Sear meat both sides to seal in the juices before cooking or BBQ-ing.

Kiwifruit as a marinade is a great tenderiser of tough meat cuts.

Lamb produces the best result when roasted. Bake lamb chops in the oven on a wire grille and collect the fat underneath with a foil lined dish. Place some fresh rosemary sprigs on the chops prior to baking.

Ignore the health freaks and cook with some salt - not handfuls - just a 1/8 or 1/4 teaspoon added to stews, vegetables and nearly all dishes improves the flavour.
A sprinkle of white or black pepper also does the same for all meat dishes. Go easy on the spices, the aim is to complement the food, not overwhelm the flavour.

Don't deep fry chunky chips or wedges. After slicing the potatoes into big chunks lengthwise, pat them dry with a paper towel, place them on a foil-lined flat oven plate, spray with rice-bran oil (rice-bran oil has the highest cooking temperature before degradation - and it tastes good, too) - sprinkle the chips with a liberal sprinkle of salt, and cook for 45-50 minutes in a fan-forced oven at 180°C.
Turn them initially after 10 mins to stop them sticking to the foil, and turn them once more during cooking. People will kill for these.

probes
27th Aug 2013, 05:23
P.S drinking beer while waiting for the meat to be crisp and 'incredibly tender' works best for me. Although once a friend almost talked me into believing the fish (wrapped in foil) he makes in his dishwasher is edible. Must have been as he was a really good cook.

Capetonian
27th Aug 2013, 05:27
Reading through this reminds me of an ex gf, a Rhodesian who couldn't even burn water as she wouldn't have known how to turn the stove on to do that.

One of her first attempts at a meal for me was curry, which she knew I liked. She got precooked chicken breasts, put them in a pot of hot water, and attempted to stir in curry powder.

I bought fillet steak once and she asked me 'how long do I have to boil this for?' Truly a useless creature.

Then I have a friend who put bacon into the microwave - in the plastic packet!

probes
27th Aug 2013, 05:31
Useless? oh, really, Cape? :}

The sister of a friend of mine put the unboiled pasta from a pack on a frying pan. Seriously.

500N
27th Aug 2013, 05:42
I was amazed when I met my current GF just over 4 years ago,
we got talking about cooking and I said I liked Boiled eggs,
to which she replied so did her son but she couldn't cook them !

This surprised me as she does every other type of cooking superbly.

She can now also do boiled eggs just as her son likes them :ok:
but what surprises me is she had never tried boiling an egg to
see if she could do it.

After all, the worst thing that can happen with cooking is
you burn it which mean you throw it out and start again :O

500N
27th Aug 2013, 05:44
One track

That is a superb web site of recipes.

Thanks for posting :ok:

Krystal n chips
27th Aug 2013, 05:54
" The interweb is FULL of ideas but I think I need more real experience and here on JB I know we have a range of talents from some of us who can burn water to making gourmet steak egg n chips

No kidding !....and...there are also those quaint, old fashioned I know, items called...cookery books !

The principle is remarkably simple....it you can read and look at the photographs.....you can cook !.....if however your wish was to inform the world , well the JB world that is, that you are cooking for two, that's rather different....and if you are cooking for two, why not choose a dish, do a solo run as it were and then cometh the night, plain sailing.

Life can be so complicated can't it ?

500N
27th Aug 2013, 05:56
Krystal

"why not choose a dish, do a solo run as it were"

+ 1

I am surprised more do not do this.

Just like my GF, she had never tried to boil an egg and get it right
by trial and error.

mixture
27th Aug 2013, 06:10
Just like my GF, she had never tried to boil an egg and get it right
by trial and error.

I hope you bought her a copy of Delia's seminal work on the topic of Eggs and their boiling?

500N
27th Aug 2013, 06:14
No, I didn't actually.

I made her attend the

"Nigel's 15 minute class of how to boil an egg to perfection" :O


Going to be in print for Christmas, I can reserve you a copy if you like :O

Capetonian
27th Aug 2013, 06:38
How to boil an egg in easy steps :

Turn tap clockwise whilst holding saucepan underneath so that water fills pan to depth of egg(s).

Turn tap anticlockwise until water stops flowing when water depth as described above is reached.

Remove egg(s) from carton and place in saucepan.

Refer to stove manufacturer's operating and safety manual before switching on gas/power.

Wear suitable protective clothing at all times as boiling water can cause severe burns.

Ensure you are not allergic to eggs.

No doubt there is a gap in the market for this somewhere!

B Fraser
27th Aug 2013, 06:48
In my wooing days, I had a recipe for a sauce which became known as "knickerdropper". It was never known to fail. :E

If the girl likes steak then fry some chopped onion and garlic reducing it down to the point where it becomes sweet, add Worcester sauce (proper Lea and Perrins, not that Heinz shyte), reduce it down again, add some cream, keep on a very low heat until it thickens and add black pepper to taste.

Do her a light cooked breakfast the following day with roasted cherry tomatoes in balsamic vinegar and olive oil.

:ok:

ex_matelot
27th Aug 2013, 07:09
beer can chicken...for the win :)
google it -it's divs!!!


Posted from Pprune.org App for Android

Capetonian
27th Aug 2013, 07:21
In my wooing days there was a cheap and nasty, but effective, method known as LPR (liquid panty remover). Hangover more or less guaranteed too!http://www.distri-liq.co.za/assets/Sedgwicks%20Old%20Brown%20Sherry%20Distell.jpg

Lon More
27th Aug 2013, 07:30
Two of my favourite food groups, chicken and cider (and for the benefit of the annoying Walloon buffoon in the Stella Artois ad, "It's Cider not cidre in the original Flemish).

http://i.qkme.me/35cftg.jpg

500N
27th Aug 2013, 07:32
Yes, LPR, heard of that one :O

Worrals in the wilds
27th Aug 2013, 07:47
"Nigel's 15 minute class of how to boil an egg to perfection"
If your surname is Lawson I'm packing up and going home. :}

500N
27th Aug 2013, 07:49
No, not Lawson, it's a semi famous British make of fine China ;)
(That's a hint as to what my surname is :O)

Solid Rust Twotter
27th Aug 2013, 08:24
Shanks?


Or is that porcelain...?:E


Can't go wrong with steak. Use a good cut like rump, and plenty of it. Season with a little Maldon salt, some ground white pepper and a drop of Tabasco then into a red hot cast iron skillet for a minute or two each side. Allow to rest for three minutes then serve and consume immediately.

The other vittles need to be ready and on the table with this dish. You can either slice into strips on a wooden board or serve whole. Goes best with a green salad, fresh home made pita bread (do this in the same skillet using your own beer bread dough before the steak goes in), and a bowl of home made aioli. Stuff salad and strips of rare steak into pita, top with aioli and devour.

Scoffing with your hands will highlight your het tigerness, while the ease and speed with which you conjure up dinner will impress the knickers off her. You can't lose.

The SSK
27th Aug 2013, 09:12
Might fish be on the menu?

This is easy, tasty, impressive and you can vary it to suit your tastes. It’s also not terribly time-critical.

Start with two nice white fish fillets, I would use cod or haddock.

Make a white sauce, the easiest way is to put flour, milk and butter in a saucepan and heat from cold, stirring/whisking continuously, let it bubble for a short while, taking care not to let it burn on the bottom. I do it instinctively, for quantities you might want to look up ‘one step white sauce’ on the net.

Now for the fancy bit – you are going to flavour the white sauce with something vegetable-ish. You could use just parsley, or better still watercress, finely chopped and lots of. Or you could use finely sliced leeks, or chicory, or finely chopped cauliflower or broccoli. These should be lightly steamed or boiled before adding to the sauce. Or you may think of something else – asparagus is nice but to get enough flavour you might have to infuse the milk with the trimmings beforehand.

Then all you do is take a baking dish which will hold the two fillets, lightly butter the bottom, put in a spoonful of the sauce and sit the fish on top, pour over the rest of the sauce, cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes at 200C. It won’t spoil if it goes a bit over this and it will keep hot out of the oven if your veg (small new potatoes and … whatever) aren’t quite ready.

If I was doing cauli or broccoli I might tart it up with a sprinkling of toasted almond flakes – just toss them briefly in a very hot, dry, heavy small frying pan, taking care not to burn them.

mikedreamer787
27th Aug 2013, 09:29
Back in my wooing days we cracked
a bottle of old "Legopner" which was
guaranteed to get her juices flowing.

http://www.whiskyparadise.com/public/4441_Southern_Comfort.jpg

You made sure she guzzled the
stuff like water. You didn't. All
you did was sip. But if you did
decide to hoyk down the bottle
all you had left of any real use
afterwards was your tongue...

Worrals in the wilds
27th Aug 2013, 11:31
Aaaargh! Southern Comfort. I got massively sick drinking that in my early twenties :yuk:. IIRC someone was pouring it down my throat :E but the effect wasn't what was intended...:\
Pour in moderation and serve with food. :}

mikedreamer787
27th Aug 2013, 11:39
IIRC someone was pouring it down my throat

Look at it as a compliment Worrals - you must've been one
hell of a stunner back then for a bloke to actually bother to
pour it down your gullet! :)

Agree it should be served to her with food, but afterwards it
should be offered in guzzlement while the guzzlee merely sips.

Worked for me! :ok:

radeng
27th Aug 2013, 13:23
Chop up an onion and fry it in a little oil. Coat a pork chop with seasoned flour (flour with a bit of salt and pepper added) and quickly sear that. Put the onions, pork chop and some dried sage in a casserole dish and add sufficient dry cider to cover. Place dish in oven at about 170 or 180 C for about an hour, drink excess cider. Accompanying veg? Chop a leek or two or even three into 1 inch lengths wash, put in saucepan with a bit of butter a tablespoon of or possibly two of water, a little black pepper and a little salt, put on low heat so the water just simmers for 45 minutes to an hour.
Set another pan of water to boil, ten minutes before serving meat, put frozen corn cobs into water, boil for ten minutes, serve with a dollop of butter on them.

Experience tells me that 'fresh' corn cobs from greengrocers or supermarkets are not as good as frozen ones, which in turn are not as good as fresh from the garden. Best results are when it takes about two minutes from plant to pan.

For a first course, crush a clove of garlic, wipe round dish and discard. Slice a sufficient quantity of tomatoes, lay slices in dish in layers. If like, put tarragon leaves between layers. Pour on malt vinegar and leave in refrigerator for 30 minutes.

RJM
27th Aug 2013, 14:49
If it's a warm, tropical night, try this cold soup.

Pour your guest a glass of white wine, and tell her that you just want to knock up something nice.

In the kitchen, mix one tin of tomato soup with a tin of cold milk. Use the same tin - it uses up all the tomato soup and gives you nice clean rubbish.

Now the clever chef-like part. Using a 'fruit baller', make a lot of little balls out of rockmelon aka cantaloupe and add them to the soup.

Add a bit of Worcester sauce for piquancy (as described on the bottle) and perhaps a bit of mustard powder.

Stir it up and garnish with mint leaves. Serve with more chilled white wine. This is a most impressive dish for about 5 minutes' work and with the wine should help you score. A point or two in her estimation as a guy with a spread of abilities, that is.

SoundBarrier
28th Aug 2013, 00:13
KrystalnChips - seriously??
No kidding !....and...there are also those quaint, old fashioned I know, items called...cookery books !

The principle is remarkably simple....it you can read and look at the photographs.....you can cook !.....if however your wish was to inform the world , well the JB world that is, that you are cooking for two, that's rather different....and if you are cooking for two, why not choose a dish, do a solo run as it were and then cometh the night, plain sailing.

Life can be so complicated can't it ?

Not only are there cookbooks, there is google, and there are magazines. The same can be said for a lot of information on PPrune :ugh:

There seem to be a few left field ideas which have been good so far which I may use. Hence the request for ideas!! :D

Thanks for the unhelpful commentary.

Airborne Aircrew
28th Aug 2013, 00:15
Thanks for the unhelpful commentary.

Shhh.. You'll bruise his feelings...

pigboat
28th Aug 2013, 02:02
..it's a semi famous British make of fine China.
Your name is Bone? ;)

500N
28th Aug 2013, 02:13
pigboat

:O

No, but they made bone China and Porcelain.
They still make it today.

It's also a name of a village - looks bloody small on the map :O

They merged with Royal Doulton and then of course RD
became part of Waterford Wedgewood.

Krystal n chips
28th Aug 2013, 03:59
" Not only are there cookbooks, there is google, and there are magazines. The same can be said for a lot of information on PPRuNe

There seem to be a few left field ideas which have been good so far which I may use. Hence the request for ideas!!

Ah, all is now clear. Your request for recipes has little to do with food, much more to do a subliminal boast ( being male, and yes, I am male to save you asking ) that you have met a lady and feel compelled to inform the world with the unstated optimism this meeting will lead to................

Are you an Americun then, with the "left field" comment?........alternative cooking being more apt, although hardly recommended for a first meal with romance in mind.



Thanks for the unhelpful commentary

Never a problem....bon appetite !

500N
28th Aug 2013, 04:07
"( being male, and yes, I am male to save you asking )"

I can't be the only one who thought you were female :O

You really should change your name !

SoundBarrier
28th Aug 2013, 06:51
oh boy...:suspect:

FYI - me n the missus have been together quite some number of years now ....been there done the woo-ing. Not once did I mention the term "romantic".

She's lost her mother, and I am taking her away on a weekend to take her mind off things, she's a foodie and likes the odd wine so I am looking at making a little effort for a little reprieve.

I'm sorry if I came across "i'm a guy trying to root a girl on a night out". I am a foodie myself, very good at drinking beer mind, but this weekend is about the swmbo.

Anyway - I do like some of the ideas, some I would not have even looked at some in the ole' cook book.

I saw a good one with Camembert mixed with almonds and chives wrapped in filo pastry and lightly fried in olive oil as a starter. Sounds scrumptious.

Octopussy2
28th Aug 2013, 07:23
I don't think it's you who should be apologising SoundBarrier.

Honestly, can't even come on here for a nice little chat about food without someone getting @rsey.

If she's feeling down, you might want to think about a nice pudding. For something indulgent, unusual but easy, try Nigel Slater's white chocolate pots with cardamom - delish - if you google it, the recipe is easy to find.

SoundBarrier
28th Aug 2013, 08:12
If she's feeling down, you might want to think about a nice pudding. For something indulgent, unusual but easy, try Nigel Slater's white chocolate pots with cardamom - delish - if you google it, the recipe is easy to find.

ooh oh oh! Those look yummy, a little easier than the home-made icecream I think - THANKS Octopussy2!

Worrals in the wilds
28th Aug 2013, 08:55
Honestly, can't even come on here for a nice little chat about food without someone getting @rsey.
Treat it as a virtual pub and it all makes sense. What would a pub be without its resident angry person? :E You'd miss them if they weren't there...

Speaking of Camembert I saw a nice recipe recently where (from memory) you cut a small Camembert in half, put some sliced mushrooms and shaved prosciutto on top and grill both halves until they're soft, then add some rocket and cracked pepper. I haven't tried it yet but it sounds delicious.

MagnusP
28th Aug 2013, 09:31
Delia has a recipe for pot-roast guinea fowl in cider, calvados and apples. Very tasty.

Octopussy2
28th Aug 2013, 09:33
Worrals of course, you are right, as so often.

SoundBarrier -aarghh, sorry, forgot you had pudding already covered. But yes, they are v easy and you get credit for doing something fancy :)

Cacophonix
28th Aug 2013, 09:58
Honestly, can't even come on here for a nice little chat about food without someone getting @rsey.

Food has always had its arsey side... I mean just look at these food critics... ;)

10 Most Scathing New York Times Restaurant Reviews Of All Time (http://www.buzzfeed.com/emofly/10-most-scathing-new-york-times-restaurant-reviews)

Back to the thread at hand, I note you haven't chosen your wine yet?

I recommend a good bottle of the 3 Stones Sauvignon Blanc... (and then another one) ...

Caco

mikedreamer787
28th Aug 2013, 10:28
Cock in cider

Dickins is a popular brand of cider I hear.

V2-OMG!
29th Aug 2013, 05:51
Women really like whimsey - something that speaks to the inner child. Titillate this, and you'll be her darling.

For the appetizer and dessert, here's a suggestion:

Smoked salmon meets your easy and elegant criteria. If she likes it, how about a smoked-salmon lollipop as an appetizer? (If she doesn't like smoked salmon, you could use a good Italian prosciutto).

http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/recipes/smoked-salmon-lollipops/

Besides the cream cheese pops, you could also wrap the salmon around melon balls - honeydew and cantaloupe - and spear with a stick.

A granita refreshes the palate between the appetizer and main course. Puree seeded cucumber into a pulp, add gin, salt, and sugar to taste, and firm up in freezer. Serve it as an icy slush - the consistency of a 7/11 Slurpee.

You could up your homemade yogurt/ice cream dessert with a make-your-own sundae bar. Put the chocolate/strawberry sauce and toppings like nuts, candies, bananas etc. in martini glasses with a spoon or scoop. Don't forget the whipped cream and cherry on top! She can pick and choose to her heart's content.

Smoked-salmon lollipops, a "Slurpee" granita, and an ice-cream sundae -
all resonate within that inner child and are delicious.

Have fun!

SoundBarrier
29th Aug 2013, 10:20
V2 - brilliant.

She's not a salmon girl, but the granita will be just perfect!! She loves a little gin now'n'gain and that looks excellent.

I also love the idea of the sundae bar - problem is I might eat it all before she gets there!! :D

Airborne Aircrew
29th Aug 2013, 12:59
I also love the idea of the sundae bar - problem is I might eat it all before she gets there!!

Don't put it out until Monday then... :}

mikedreamer787
29th Aug 2013, 14:30
I also love the idea of the sundae bar - problem is I might eat her before it all gets there!!

Fixed that for you! :)

V2-OMG!
29th Aug 2013, 19:14
SoundBarrier, you're very welcome. It's about showing the love. You were already well on your way. :ok:

pssst.....just one more thing. Don't forget the milk and cookies on her bedside table.....

http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL1942/12014112/24383456/407468005.jpg

Rossian
29th Aug 2013, 19:24
......I do hope that you're not going to do what a lot of other advice-seekers have done...

take all this accumulated gen, get all the "kudos" and other "benefits in kind" then b&&ger off without giving us all a sitrep afterwards.

We'll come and haunt you if you do - promise.

The Ancient Mariner

Airborne Aircrew
29th Aug 2013, 21:05
take all this accumulated gen, get all the "kudos" and other "benefits in kind" then b&&ger off with giving us all a sitrep afterwards.

I agree... You're going to need video... :}

BenThere
29th Aug 2013, 21:19
If she's despondent, I recommend putting on the coat and tie and taking her out to a great restaurant, like Morton's or Ruths Cris. Spend the $300 on lobster or the barrel filet mignon, and a nice bottle of red. Have flowers delivered before you go. That shows you care.

Some other time put some quality ingredients and seasonings into the rice cooker and see what happens. It's usually good.

SoundBarrier
29th Aug 2013, 22:11
:= NO video ha ha ha.

Sitrep to follow for sure, I'll try a photie or 3...:ok:

Nani
30th Aug 2013, 03:40
Starter: if you have an access to fresh figs,gorgonzola chees and thinly sliced bacon.
Wash and half the figs,stuff small amount of gorgonzola cheese then wrap a small slice of bacon,bake or fry until bacon is cooked. Garnish with chopped parsley.

Entree: 2 deboned and skinned chicken breasts,butter (unsalted) pint of heavy whipping cream,sliced mushrooms and thinly sliced scallions.
Brown both sides of chicken breasts in butter and light olive oil or vegetable oil (to prevent butter from burning) turn down the heat to medium,add sliced mushroom for about 10 minutes,add the heavy cream and little salt and pepper to taste. Cook until heavy cream thickens (10 to 15 minutes). Move the breasts into plate,dribble heavy cream on top and garnish with sliced scallions. You can make rice or some pasta on the side.

Salad : Baby spinach,some left over cooked bacon (chopped),roasted pine nuts or chopped walnut and thin sliced asiago cheese or crumbled goat cheese. Dress with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

It takes less than an hour to prepare and cook.

mikedreamer787
30th Aug 2013, 04:51
pssst.....just one more thing. Don't forget the milk and cookies on her bedside
table.....

And not to be served in the early hours of Dec 25 or old Santa will beat her to it.

Solid Rust Twotter
30th Aug 2013, 06:09
Along the lines of Nani's warm bacon, cheese and fig bites, try a cold version:

Slice of dried fig with a dollop of mascarpone, wrapped in thinly sliced serrano or parma ham is the business. A large plate of these served with a good port is sublime. Even better if the weather warrants a fire in the hearth where the toes may be gently toasted.

Nani
31st Aug 2013, 20:00
SRT,

Tried your cold version of figs,mascarpon with prosciutto. Didn't have dried figs on hand so had to use fresh figs with mascarpon and it was very tasty but prosciutto slice didn't add any taste to it. Does parma or serrano hams cured saltier? I can order iberico ham to try it again.

I keep Armangac sauce in the frig,that ought to plump up dried figs well enough to serve with a dollop of mascarpone.:ok:

Thanks for the ideas.

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Sep 2013, 05:48
Dang! The Armagnac idea sounds like a winner. Soaking the dried figs in that for an hour or two should be a great flavour enhancer. The figs and mascarpone are to lift the ham, so don't be shy using a longish strip to wrap it. Haven't tried it with prosciutto but the Parma and Serrano aren't hugely different IMO. All add their own touch to the filling.

Also works with a ripe buttery gorgonzola instead of mascarpone if you want a sharper flavour. The Armagnac should really come into its own with that.:ok:

modtinbasher
1st Sep 2013, 15:02
modtinbashette is crazy about these

http://s6.postimg.org/wyyqsz7pt/DSCF0638.jpg

teeteringhead
1st Sep 2013, 15:29
That's one helluva way to spell "Sandwich Cakes"!

Capetonian
1st Sep 2013, 15:34
It was the 'Knob Lice' that made me laugh!

(I think it's Serbian by the way)

Worrals in the wilds
1st Sep 2013, 22:00
They look delicious!:ok:
These are also popular in Australia with the ladies, and for good reason.
http://www.americansweets.co.uk/ekmps/shops/statesidecandy/images/arnott-s-original-tim-tam-cookies-200g-pack-18681-p.jpg
Many years ago they were taken off the shelves for a fortnight due to a blackmail poisoning attempt on the company.

Once the blackmailer was caught, Arnotts could sell their products again. They used very distinctive delivery vans, and that day I saw one making its way through the Brisbane CBD literally followed by a crowd of women with their wallets out. IIRC they sold the Tim Tams straight off the pallets as soon as the driver pulled up at Coles and got the doors open.

Donkey497
1st Sep 2013, 23:06
Might be a bit late, but I'd suggest a simple starter of crispy bacon, scallops & black pudding.

I usually go with three king scallops each with a good rasher of (if you run it to earth) thick cut, medium streaky maple cure bacon on a good moist (Stornoway) black pudding. I usually do the bacon under a weight on a grid in the oven to keep it fairly flat. The black pudding, I usually slice to about 1/2" thick and warm it in the same pan as I use to sautee the scallops, once one side of the scallop starts to carmelise, I turn it over & add in the black pudding. Stack the scallop on the black pudding and rest a piece of bacon on each. If you feel the need to jazz it up with a sauce, I'd rustle one up from a few teaspoons of thick cut (bitter) Seville orange marmalade heated with some Grand Marnier or Cointreau and some fresh chopped mint whisked in.

I think I'd go for simple pasta for the main course.

Some Swedish meatballs [available at your local flat pack store....] warmed in a simple tomato sauce and served with a mix of linguine & spaghetti. Either do your own sauce(de-seeded plum tomatoes, garlic, herbs & olive oil) or adapt or use a pre-made sauce, depending on the time & skill you have .

Simple but well made always wins over fancy & fussy.

mikedreamer787
2nd Sep 2013, 00:16
literally followed by a crowd of women with their wallets out.

I bet you were in that crowd Worrals! ;)

Do you normally have yours with coffee
or tea?

I dunno what's the attraction of those
chockie bickies. Every woman in Oz
seems to have been born with a Tim
Tam gene.

500N
2nd Sep 2013, 00:19
Mike

Not just women. Men as well.

Put out a plate of Tim Tams and if they last more than 2 minutes,
something is wrong !!!

The Double Choc and flavoured one's aren't bad either.

What's not to like about them :O

mikedreamer787
2nd Sep 2013, 00:27
There's nothing wrong with 'em 500N but men
don't list Tim Tams as part of the five major
essential food groups like women do. If they're
proffered I might have one but I don't scoff the
whole plate.

Besides...they're bloody fattening!

http://media2.apnonline.com.au/img/media/images/2012/01/26/IQT_27-01-2012_NEWS_02_GLADE26A_fct1025x631x50_t460.jpg

mikedreamer787
2nd Sep 2013, 02:11
Worrals you'll have to teach me how you guys
do the Tim Tam Slam.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRKoatlhy3AAEqdEeo6WgcHqQS5oMRkhYecaAoSkdu _GmUl6avSIw

I did try it once but it ended up as a muddy
sludge at the bottom of my coffee mug.

500N
2nd Sep 2013, 02:25
Jesus, I haven't done a Tim Tam Slam for years.
My GF asked me about it the other day - while
I was scoffing the Tim Tam's !!!

And you do put on weight from eating Tim Tams !!!

Worrals in the wilds
2nd Sep 2013, 07:48
I bet you were in that crowd Worrals!
Actually no, I'm not really a chocolate person. That's how I could observe from afar...:cool:

mikedreamer787
2nd Sep 2013, 11:24
What's your skin color got to do with it Worrals? :p

Worrals in the wilds
2nd Sep 2013, 11:36
Nothing to do with skin colour, when it comes to taste I just prefer a bit of salt and/or spice.
Take that as you wish! :p:E

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Sep 2013, 12:52
Never really got TimTams. Tried them in Darwin and they were just too sweet, while being pretty tasteless in terms of real flavour. The groin clutching excitement of Ozmates in the presence of the things goes right over my head, I'm afraid.

Octopussy2
2nd Sep 2013, 13:29
They look like Penguin biscuits, which aren't particularly exciting. Am I missing some unique feature?

mikedreamer787
2nd Sep 2013, 23:23
To answer that you'd need to ask an Oz woman I think.

Apparently blokes reckon they go well with plonk -

http://www.sweers.com.au/Update%20Photos/2009/xtrata%20tim%20tam%20gang.web.jpg

500N
2nd Sep 2013, 23:29
SRT

I don't like sweet biscuits up in Darwin, probably to do with the heat !!!


Octopussy
Yes, they have a very nice taste.

SoundBarrier
3rd Sep 2013, 00:21
Tims Tams have made the list!! :ok:

Even if just for dunking in milk at the bedside...

All go for the weekend...roll on Friday.

Solid Rust Twotter
3rd Sep 2013, 05:11
Could be, Mr N. One prefers less sweet stuff anyway. Used to get dog biscuits in our rat packs, huge chunky things with oatmeal and all sorts of stuff in them that needed a good swing at it with the fangs to make any kind of dent. Loved those and would happily trade the tinned crap for them. The idiots in charge have now seen fit to replace them with some kind of effete commercial brand that has flowers in relief on the biscuit.


Says it all, really...

500N
3rd Sep 2013, 05:21
SRT

Aaahhh, the old rock hard dog biscuits. You would have been one of the one's
I traded tinned food for them, I never ate them !!!

" replace them with some kind of effete commercial brand that has flowers in relief on the biscuit."
That applies to everything I think. We just are not big enough to have a factory churning out stuff for our military.

During my service we went to pouch food where you added hot water.
IMHO, a vast improvement over the tinned food. Only problem was you
needed to carry lots of water. Not so good in some places in Aus.

TURIN
4th Sep 2013, 10:24
Fajeetahs!
Dead easy and you can have chicken, beef, prawns or just veg.

Another simple winner is care of Keith-just time for a short slurp-Floyd. Chicken breast in a leek and cream sauce. A net search should find it.

Nigella's Meatloaf (wrapped around boiled eggs) and encased in streaky bacon should hit the retro nerve.
For a starter, simple to prepare but spectacular, a seafood board, smoked salmon, roll mops, prawns, etc with some mayo, aioli, marie-rose sauce, lemons wedges and a few bits of fine bread.
Got me thinking now....Potted shrimps if you can't find em, or a smoked mackeral pate, just mash up some smoked mackeral fillets with some cream cheese (EG Philadelphia) a few squirts of lemon juice, served with dainty triangles of brown bread for the fine dining or a thick cut bloomer for the oiks.
God I'm hungry now.


Posted from Pprune.org App for Android

SoundBarrier
9th Sep 2013, 08:04
So we ate, I got heavier and had a great time.

Thanks for the suggestions, the Mrs loved the whole weekend. The food was awesome. Except the bread - I made a god awful loaf, heavier than platinum somehow!!:eek:

Lon More
9th Sep 2013, 08:38
another easy dessert
500g of seedless white grapes. Pull them off the stalks then put them in the freezer for a couple of hours.
Add a tablespoon of honey and blitz them with a mixer. Served in champagne glasses, a classy, tasty granita

Worrals in the wilds
9th Sep 2013, 11:51
So we ate, I got heavier and had a great time.
Good stuff. PPRuNesterchef wins the day! :ok:
I think we all got a few recipe tips (and a lot of entertainment) so thanks. :D

IME making your own bread is like doing your own wiring. It looks easy enough in the manual, but has explosively embarrassing consequences. Best left to the pros! :}

V2-OMG!
23rd Sep 2013, 02:30
Was wondering how it went.

Your attempt at bread was ambitious! :D

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Sep 2013, 07:29
Bread is one of the simplest things to make, and one of the most satisfying. It's also versatile as anything and can be baked/fried/steamed/stuffed in a variety of ways.

I use it as a pie crust among other things (great to sop up the juices when you're done), dessert, quick snack and have a couple of ideas for a fried layer bread with rosemary, chives and black pepper.