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View Full Version : Printed gun! Oh the humanity!


Cacophonix
12th May 2013, 01:49
Now that the Daily Wail has jumped on the "printed gun" hysteria wagon I am surprised that the many gun specialists here on JB (of which there are many) have not called out the patent nonsense behind this so called weapon...

How Mail On Sunday 'printed' first plastic gun in UK - and then took it on board Eurostar without being stopped in security scandal | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2323158/How-Mail-On-Sunday-printed-plastic-gun-UK--took-board-Eurostar-stopped-security-scandal.html)


If this ' security invisible' gun is deadly then I suspect it is more likely to be deadly to any idiot trying to use it as this article clearly demonstrates in my humble opinion...

'Liberator': Proof that you CAN'T make a working gun in a 3D printer ? The Register (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/10/oh_no_its_the_plastic_3d_gun/)

I would put more trust in a sharpened tooth brush to do the lethal business than this product of media hype...

What do the armaments specialists here think?

Caco

500N
12th May 2013, 01:54
Making a big issue over nothing.

Anyone with half a deviant mind could almost certainly
get onto the train with a stripped down normal firearm
- ie pistol.

galaxy flyer
12th May 2013, 02:02
So, one buys a $10,000 3D printer to produce a modest zip gun. It has scared the DC gun grabbing crowd, the DoS took down some of their web info.

The plastic gun has been the "next big thing" for years, it'll remain the same for years.

BTW, for that kind of cake, I'd have much better guns made.

GF

500N
12th May 2013, 02:12
You can make a basic shotgun out of a piece of 3/4" pipe,
a nail, a cap and a few other bits and pieces.

And probably for less than $50 or $100.


If I had to spend $10,000 on a printer to get a plastic gun,
I'd get a custom gun made for $10,0000 that would be
worth $10,000.

Dushan
12th May 2013, 02:24
The only people excited about this are the ones who know nothing about guns. Spending thousands to make a one (or two or three, but most likely not four) time use gun is utter nonsense.

This thing is more dangerous to the shooter than anyone else...

Ozzy
12th May 2013, 02:46
Why does it matter where the gun is produced? Isn't it the person in who's hand the weapon is in?

Ozzy

galaxy flyer
12th May 2013, 03:16
500N

Rxactly, which is why my M70 will soon be off to a stocker.

GF

500N
12th May 2013, 03:48
GF

You can buy a wide range of off the shelf stocks for the M70.
Great guns, I have 3 of them.

Solid Rust Twotter
12th May 2013, 05:41
Don't need a gee-whizz printer to build a firearm. Ask any Afghan in the border areas.

sitigeltfel
12th May 2013, 05:43
You could also print yourself a firearms certificate :rolleyes:

tony draper
12th May 2013, 07:46
:E
12 GAUGE ZIP GUN HOMEMADE SHOTGUN PIPE GUN - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7Va87gB_4AI#)!

Lon More
12th May 2013, 08:09
I bet there'll be a few candidates for Darwin Awards trying that FSL.
You'd need some fairly high spec. tubing and I'd go for hand loaded shells, gradually building up to a full load.

arcniz
12th May 2013, 08:18
Topic premise is transparent idiocy. Is quite clear that the instant manufacture concept - as portrayed in the featherbrain press in re weapons - mostly serves as a deflater for the manic political cohort who want to save the world by making laws for and against everything in sight -- or possible in prospect.

Publishing links and guidance for DIY mahyem kits here by way of rebuttal may be a bit off target for this site, however. Peut' etre?

Cacophonix
12th May 2013, 08:35
I find the whole concept of 3D 'printing' more interesting in itself than any useless artefact, like this so called gun, that may emerge from the fabrication process.

In fact the Open Source algorithm to produce a home grown 3D printer that can replicate itself tickles my fancy...

RepRap Project - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RepRap)

Of course none of this is really totally new. Programmable cnc machines have been around for a while but it has all become more interesting as the forms, technology and materials used for fabrication have burgeoned and as prices have made the technology affordable by mere mortals.

DVD Volume 2: CNC Guitar Machining - YouTube

Caco

tony draper
12th May 2013, 09:00
Print these buggas.:rolleyes:
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/Elswick_Shipbuilding_Yard_1898_Finishing_Big_Guns_copy_zpsc8 9d915b.jpg (http://s11.photobucket.com/user/Deaddogbay/media/Elswick_Shipbuilding_Yard_1898_Finishing_Big_Guns_copy_zpsc8 9d915b.jpg.html)

Flying Binghi
12th May 2013, 09:18
via tony draper:

12 GAUGE ZIP GUN HOMEMADE SHOTGUN PIPE GUN - YouTube!


Trip wire shot gun dingo traps used to be common around sheep areas in Oz. Some dogs got a bit shy of clamp traps and baited meat so other methods tried.

Piece of gal water pipe takes a 12 gauge just nice. Bit of threaded gal joiner with a nail hole drilled plug holds the cartridge. Half an old rabbit trap is the 'hammer' to which is attached the trip wire. With the whole lot fixed to a large lump of wood. Then go find a dingo run in a sheep free paddock and set up the 'trap'. If yer fergets where all the traps have been set ensure sheep use the paddock before yerself..:)






.

tony draper
12th May 2013, 09:57
When I was a sprog we didn't need zip shotguns,I had a ancient Spanish double 12 with outside hammers when I was 14 years old ,ten bob gun licence from any corner post office was all that was needed.
:)

Flap 5
12th May 2013, 10:22
The Register article is written for the U.S. market where guns are freely available. The plastic gun can easily be ridiculed with that in mind.

The concern is that the gun can be taken through airport or Eurostar railway station security without being detected by metal detectors.

They should, however, be detectable by the latest x-ray detectors that you put your bags through. And security staff make you take off any extra clothing, in the form of coats and jackets, before you walk through the arch detector so they could see if you had relatively bulky gun parts in your pockets.

If security staff for the Eurostar had done their job properly they should have detected the gun.

hellsbrink
12th May 2013, 10:26
The Register article is written for the U.S. market where guns are freely available. The plastic gun can easily be ridiculed with that in mind.

The concern is that the gun can be taken through airport or Eurostar railway station security without being detected by metal detectors.

They should, however, be detectable by the latest x-ray detectors that you put your bags through. And security staff make you take off any extra clothing, in the form of coats and jackets, before you walk through the arch detector so they could see if you had relatively bulky gun parts in your pockets.

If security staff for the Eurostar had done their job properly they should have detected the gun.

So nothing has changed since I took the Eurostar over here in 2005, then.

Cacophonix
12th May 2013, 10:39
Clearly an undetectable gun would be a cause for some security alarm but as this silly piece of plastic really doesn't meet the criteria for being a gun I would argue that the media interest is all froth and hyperbole. If the Eurostar security staff had missed a live bullet then I would say yes there is a case for concern but the two eager Mail reporters didn't appear to go as far as bringing ammunition for their 'deadly' weapon.

I imagine in extremis the use of the plastic tray on which the two young pups ate their train meal might have proved more useful in the case of affray than the silly overly bulky piece of plastic rubbish that they had so cunningly smuggled past the security people.

I am by no means a fan of concealed weapons (although I am not anti gun per se) but I think in this case some perspective has been lost.

Caco

ExRAFRadar
12th May 2013, 10:47
Mr Draper - :D

G-CPTN
12th May 2013, 20:51
BBC News - US government orders removal of Defcad 3D-gun designs (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22478310)

cldrvr
12th May 2013, 21:36
If I had to spend $10,000 on a printer to get a plastic gun


Staples sells them for £1299, special order only.

tony draper
12th May 2013, 21:52
In these hard times you could probably hire a hit man for $50 to do your killing for you.
:rolleyes:

Dushan
12th May 2013, 22:17
Staples sells them for £1299, special order only.

Ah, so we can blame Romney. At least it's not GWB's fault.

Cacophonix
12th May 2013, 22:59
Lord as much as I would stick it to them...


Caco

Matari
13th May 2013, 00:09
In vino virtutis.

galaxy flyer
13th May 2013, 00:21
500N

True, but it would be an "off the shelf" then; not a custom walnut stock by a ACGG gunmakers, refinished M70. It deserves to be beautiful and functional. Pre-64s shouldn't be wasted, IMHO. That said, it will not be rechambered from its original 30-06.

GF

500N
13th May 2013, 00:24
Oh, it's a pre 64 !

Afraid I don't go for all the hoop over Pre 64's,
most didn't have cross bolts in them so split the
stocks with a lot of shooting.

And really, apart from being a Winnie so fall in the "Made in USA" Rah Rah BS,
all they are is a claw feed rifle ;)

galaxy flyer
13th May 2013, 02:06
500N

Maybe it's a Yank thing, that and I grew near the old factory,visited their museum many times. Then again, last month's Rock Island Auctions, many M70s didn't get near the estimates.

GF

500N
13th May 2013, 02:12
Galaxy

Believe me, it's a Yank thing :O
Plus a few OS people.

Re "many M70s didn't get near the estimates"
prices go up and down like a yo yo over time.
They were very high a few years back, have
dropped down now. A few years there will be
another rush on them.


Hey, at least the M70 of any persuasion will last
longer than a plastic gun :O

mikedreamer787
13th May 2013, 02:34
Just printed out my first 88mm. Anyone got the plans for 88mm shells?

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTCYS4-jxicRcq5MEehE9uv5muoU7yYnjbcjiaE7yK1Y2mYtjRktA

MagnusP
13th May 2013, 09:07
500N:

Hey, at least the M70 of any persuasion will last
longer than a plastic gun

Alternatively, "Hey, at least the owner of an M70 of any persuasion will last
longer than the owner of a plastic gun".

:p

vulcanised
13th May 2013, 11:57
Like to see one print a crossbow http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/evil.gif.

Flying Binghi
14th May 2013, 01:06
via vulcanised:
Like to see one print a crossbow


Would you like it in titanium ?

3D Printing, Now in Titanium | Gadget Lab | Wired.com (http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/01/3d-printing-now-in-titanium/)







.

galaxy flyer
14th May 2013, 01:55
Alternatively, "Hey, at least the owner of an M70 of any persuasion will last longer than the owner of a plastic gun".

500N and I certainly hope so!:ok:

GF

G-CPTN
14th May 2013, 17:37
3D metal printing - YouTube

Lon More
14th May 2013, 17:57
US$36 on Fleabay (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=111071888584&ssPageName=ADME:B:FSEL:CA:1123)
It might not kill me but it'd certainly loosen my bowels

ORAC
27th May 2013, 09:05
9taL4svjH_g#!

radeng
27th May 2013, 14:02
You don't need to be that skilled with a lathe, a vice, some drills, a hacksaw, some files and so on to make a pistol out of steel - or out of a high density plastic. Now more difficult would be to make a plastic cartridge that was strong enough - a lethal plastic bullet would be pretty easy too. The difficulty would be having a propellant that couldn't be detected.

A plastic air pistol could be made pretty deadly, too. But the microwave scanners should detect it.

A much better and more reliable security method would be profiling......

500N
27th May 2013, 14:08
radeng

You can use compressed air as a propellant or a high
powered spring.

And security scanners don't always pick up propellant
from firing guns. We had used my Army Echelon bag
as a rest one day, on a bench with lots of old ammo
and a bit powder etc lying around.

Couple of days later I got to Darwin Airport and they
swabbed the bag, I thought it would pick it up but it
didn't.

vulcanised
27th May 2013, 14:16
Make your bullet out of ice and when they come to do forensics on it - it's gone!.

radeng
27th May 2013, 16:49
Would dry ice i.e. frozen carbon dioxide, be heavier than water ice?

G-CPTN
27th May 2013, 17:10
The density of dry ice varies, but usually ranges between about 1.4 and 1.6 g/cm3 (87–100 lb/ft3).

The density of ice is 0.9167 g/cm3 at 0 °C.

Cacophonix
27th May 2013, 23:31
Make your bullet out of ice and when they come to do forensics on it - it's gone!.

A charming, but preposterous notion...

MythBusters Episode 1: Ice Bullet, Exploding Toilet, Who Gets Wetter? (http://mythbustersresults.com/episode1)

Ricin in a steel tipped umbrella will work though!

Caco

Flying Binghi
28th May 2013, 01:28
Make your bullet out of ice and when they come to do forensics on it - it's gone!.
A charming, but preposterous notion...

MythBusters Episode 1: Ice Bullet, Exploding Toilet, Who Gets Wetter?



I'm surprised with the findings. Looking at hail damage to cars gives me the impression that ice can do damage. Hail is not travelling as fast as a bullet either.:confused:

I didn't see the episodes so am wondering did they use some sort of covering around the ice 'bullet' to protect it when firing and to hold the ice projectile together for part of its travels ?

Polikarpov
28th May 2013, 02:36
I love Google.

[Real Product (http://www.find-me-a-gift.co.uk/ak-bullet-ice-cube-tray.html?awc=998_1369708476_b33959a170a001d36b8a47846d3f786 8)]

http://cdn.uberreview.com/wp-content/uploads/nov014_ak_bullet_ice_cube_tray.jpg

http://www.find-me-a-gift.co.uk/images/product_images/nov014_bullet_ice_tray_300mainnew.jpg

BenThere
28th May 2013, 02:51
Seems to me 3D printing is the next big thing, the technology to change the world along the lines of steam, electricity, railroads, combustion engines, mass assembly manufacturing, transistors, personal computers, and lastly, digital electronics.

Today, 3D printing is in its primitive stage, constrained by materials, shortage of knowledgeable entrepreneurs, and high cost. Like plasma TV's, though, the technology is going to come down in cost, better materials will find their way to market, and then the implications are astounding.

It wasn't so long ago, 1980 or so, that IBM introduced the first mass-market PC, suggesting every household would one day have one, even though they cost so much only the most lavishly affluent could buy, running a memory and processing power we find ludicrously primitive today. How we laughed!

Flying Binghi
23rd Jul 2013, 12:35
...It wasn't so long ago, 1980 or so, that IBM introduced the first mass-market PC, suggesting every household would one day have one, even though they cost so much only the most lavishly affluent could buy, running a memory and processing power we find ludicrously primitive today. How we laughed!

As you predicted, soon to be cheaper...

"The 3D printing “revolution” isn’t just being held up by the state of the technology. It’s also being held up by the sheer cost of a 3D printer. But in February 2014 some key patents will expire, leaving an opening for competitors come in with cheaper alternatives.

The patents in question are for a technology called “laser sintering”, the lowest-cost 3D-rinting technique. Laser sintering produces items in very high resolution, which means they can be sold as finished products, and they’re much higher quality than that flimsy novelty stuff you can make on current 3D printers on the market...."

3D Printers Might Get Much Cheaper After 2014 | Gizmodo Australia (http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2013/07/3d-printers-might-get-much-cheaper-after-2014/)








.

ORAC
9th Aug 2013, 08:21
REPORT: 3D-PRINTED RIFLE SUCCESSFULLY FIRES 14 ROUNDS (http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/08/07/Report-3D-Printed-Rifle-Successfully-Fires-14-Rounds)

A Canadian rifle maker has successfully fired a 3D-printed rifle, based on firearms designer Cody Wilson's work on a homemade handgun crafted from thermoplastics. Mashable.com reports that "Matthew" has successfully fired 14 rounds from a .22 rifle created from a 3D printer.

The rifle represents Matthew's second prototype and is called Grizzly 2.0. The barrel of the first prototype cracked after firing just one round, so he adjusted the barrel's thickness and fired 14 rounds from the next model before experiencing any problems. The Grizzly 2.0 is a single shot rifle. The user reloads it after each shot by taking off the barrel, clearing it of the spent shell casing, and loading another round.

The Grizzly 2.0's creator has uploaded video of a purportedly successful firing test.

dKsJe11itb4

Cody Wilson's Defense Distributed, an organization dedicated to creating designs for 3D "wiki weapons," revealed a single-shot pistol created with a 3D printer in May of 2013. The "Liberator" personal firearm made headlines when Wilson successfully tested it, and days later the Department of Defense demanded he pull the gun's design from his website. Defense Distributed claims to have plans for the next step in 3D firearm creation: "the lower receiver of an AR-15... rifle."