PDA

View Full Version : Catch 22 Bank Security Questions


pulse1
9th May 2013, 16:08
Yesterday I had some difficulty getting onto our Group on line bank account at Lloyds. I phoned the bank and one of the security questions they asked me was:

"What sum was paid into your account on May 7?" I asked how the hell I was supposed to know that when I couldn't access my account. I knew it could have been anyone of three payments so I had a 1 in 3 chance of getting it right. Even though I correctly told them the value of all three payments, they still insisted that I had to guess. I got it wrong so they refused to help me any further.

I then told them that there was one question which I was able to answer:

"Which bank will I be transferring our account to now?"

Idiots!:mad:

unstable load
9th May 2013, 16:41
Funny, that. I am just ditching Barclays for similar reasons.

dazdaz1
9th May 2013, 16:42
"Yesterday I had some difficulty getting onto our Group on line bank account at Lloyds" Expand on "Our Group"....................?

Fox3WheresMyBanana
9th May 2013, 16:52
I think my favourite was when they used to phone me up, and proceeded to ask security questions. I pointed out it was their own advice not to respond to callers asking security-related questions, and offered to phone them back. They stated it was a calls-out line only.
I suggested their procedures may have been designed by an idiot.There was generally a "you're-right-but-my-supervisor-is-listening"kind of grunt-mumble, at which point I rang off. Never did discover what they wanted.

Ancient Observer
9th May 2013, 17:03
My daughter has a seldom used account with Santander. However, it has money in it.

The internet access became blocked due to her failing to get in.
Then she rang them up, and they asked security questions that she did not know the answer to.

She asked me for help, and she rang again with me standing next to her. When she could not answer a question, I answered it for her. The person on the other end of the line said that she could proceed no further as my daughter had to answer the questions with no assistance.
I asked for the person's name, and I asked to be put through to a supervisor. She refused both requests, and put the phone down.

So we went to the branch.

When we finally got to the counter - (short queue but only 1 staff member, dealing with apparently complex customer issues), we were told that we could not deal with the issues at the counter, but had to see an adviser. No advisers were available that day.

Whose ferkin' money is it??????

OFSO
9th May 2013, 18:42
1) I tried to use my external-to-UK-but-British-bank card in London, discovered my card was blocked.

2) Went to nearest branch of same bank, no queue, guy on helpdesk looked at my card, said he couldn't fix it but said "let me dial your branch for you".

3) Handed me phone, three security questions followed by "and did you pay this recent bill ? OK, you did, so not fraudulent, your card is now unblocked."

Now that's the way it SHOULD be handled.

500N
9th May 2013, 18:49
OFSO

Had the same good service here from NAB handled in the same way.
Sometimes they phone me up to check, other times I have to phone
them to ask why blocked.

But also agree with some of the other posters, the way some of
the banks go about things is stupid.

pulse1
9th May 2013, 19:25
dazdaz1,

"Group" refers to a group of five people who share an aircraft, I am the book keeper for said group.

Interesting that Barclays have a similar problem. I have used them for years and never had any issues.

vulcanised
9th May 2013, 19:50
I have just (unusually) had a similar problem with First Direct.

Being an old fool who shouldn't be allowed out on his own, I confused my Visa Credit card with my Visa Debit card (they look VERY similar) when in the supermarket.

Having entered the PIN for one, three times, using the other it was locked.

Using their secure mail I askled them to unblock it, explaining what I'd done. Mail back telling me I have to do it myself at an HSBC ATM, which is not at all convenient since they closed the branch I used.

I'm sure they could have unlocked it at their HQ.

Blues&twos
9th May 2013, 20:02
Had a customer service call from Natwest last week, with security questions. I too refused politely and the bloke on the other end used the expression "catch 22". I just said that if it was importantthe bank could write to me. He apologised and said goodbye. It's probably not that clever of tbe banks to enciurage this sort of thing by asking for details themselves.

BOAC
9th May 2013, 21:48
The really worrying thing is that 90% of the 'security questions' you have to answer are all on Facebonk, Family Tree, Friends Reunited etc. It don't need a genius......................

Lantern10
9th May 2013, 22:38
You need to be firm with them. Once I had to pay some builders, their bill was 3600 pounds, I asked "How much for cash" 3000 was the reply, so off to the bank, only to be politely told that 2000 was the daily limit. I tried to discuss the situation with her. She offered to get the manager, to which I replied just tell him to bring all the money in my account as I was closing it. I got the 3000 and closed the account a few days later anyway.

Barstewards the lot of them.

ExRAFRadar
10th May 2013, 04:00
Ancient Observer,

Interesting one that. Wonder what would have happened had you called the Police based on the fact that these people were effectively stealing your money ?

Remember this ?

Customer sends bailiffs in to seize bank's computers | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-430129/Customer-sends-bailiffs-seize-banks-computers.html)

Capetonian
10th May 2013, 05:47
I confused my Visa Credit card with my Visa Debit card (they look VERY similar) when in the supermarket.
Stupid, isn't it. My cards look very similar and I have made the same mistake. I drew 500 out of my credit card instead of my debit card, so it would have attracted charges and interest. I realised immediately what I had done, went in to the branch and asked them if they could reverse it (I still had the cash in my hot sweaty hand. The enquiries girl said 'no' but 'phoned the card division for me and after a few minutes discussion they agreed to cancel the interest and charges (which would have been nearly 30). She also said 'a lot of people make the same mistake'. Have they fixed the problem? Guess!

The really worrying thing is that 90% of the 'security questions' you have to answer are all on Facebonk, Family Tree, Friends Reunited etc. It don't need a genius...........
Another bulletproof argument for not using 'social media'.

VP959
10th May 2013, 06:34
OFSO wrote:
1) I tried to use my external-to-UK-but-British-bank card in London, discovered my card was blocked.

2) Went to nearest branch of same bank, no queue, guy on helpdesk looked at my card, said he couldn't fix it but said "let me dial your branch for you".

3) Handed me phone, three security questions followed by "and did you pay this recent bill ? OK, you did, so not fraudulent, your card is now unblocked."

Now that's the way it SHOULD be handled.

Sort of similar tale. In the US, card gets refused at a restaurant one lunchtime. Luckily have enough cash for bill (why do folks in the US view people paying with cash with such suspicion?).

Big problem now, as need card to pay hotel bill in 36 hours time, yet it's blocked. Call UK card centre from hotel, to be told they've detected unusual activity on my card (spending in the US) and have blocked it. Ask them to unblock it. They say they've written me a letter (WTF?) and can only unblock it when I reply to that. I explain that the letter has been sent to my UK address, I'm in the US and I need the card to pay my hotel bill. "Sorry, we can't help" (this is Barclaycard, BTW, the company with the famous foreign support service adverts).

In desperation I call my bank in the UK (not Barclays) and explain the problem. No problem, they say, we'll issue you with a credit card immediately and electronically transfer some cash to your hotel to tide you over (this is pre-internet). I explain I'm in the US. No problem they say, we'll courier a new card to your hotel ASAP. Next day a new card arrives, with instructions to call a UK number to get it authorised. Make the call and have a new valid card, less than 24 hours after first calling them.

Needless to say that bank continued to have all my business.

500N
10th May 2013, 06:42
VP

That is bloody good service.

I am impressed.

VP959
10th May 2013, 07:05
VP

That is bloody good service.

I am impressed.

So was I.

I stayed with that bank for another ten years, until they screwed up big time with some investments (took them to the FSA, won and got a fair whack in compensation).

The bank in question was the Royal Bank of Scotland, and my investment screw up was just a year before they came close to collapse.

Amazing to see a bank go from being so good to so bad in the space of a dozen years.

Ancient Observer
10th May 2013, 13:20
ExRAF Radar,

Yes, I remember that story. That was back in the days when Natwest were charging my daughter 38.00 for each and every transaction when she was overdrawn.

I asked if they would, instead, block the account. They refused.

Clearly, very short term profit was worth more to them than a customer's loyalty.



The answer to the Santander story was that daughter went in to the bank on another day, without me, (sensible girl - I'd have been furious) - and refused to leave until they had closed the account.

Hydromet
10th May 2013, 13:29
Just before closing time on Friday, with a crowd in the bank, is an excellent time to arrive and complain loudly until they do what you want them to.

Dushan
10th May 2013, 13:31
Sort of similar tale. In the US, card gets refused at a restaurant one lunchtime. Luckily have enough cash for bill (why do folks in the US view people paying with cash with such suspicion?).




Wouldn't you be suspicious if someone tried to pay you with a credit card that gets refused, then suddenly he has money in the pocket. Could the money be as fake as the card?

If you just pulled out some cash and paid nobody would even bat an eye.

VP959
10th May 2013, 13:56
Wouldn't you be suspicious if someone tried to pay you with a credit card that gets refused, then suddenly he has money in the pocket. Could the money be as fake as the card?

If you just pulled out some cash and paid nobody would even bat an eye.

Yes, I would, but the comment about cash was intended to be taken in a broader context. It was just an observation, based on years of going to the US on business. In the early days I didn't have a credit card, so just took cash with me for short trips, and I was pretty universally treated with suspicion when checking in to hotels. I remember once around 30 or so years ago checking out and the receptionist saying in a loud voice "Oh, YOU'RE the guy that wants to pay CASH", as if it was really odd (which I think it may have been at the time - credit cards seemed then to be far more popular in the US that they were in the UK).

Standard Noise
10th May 2013, 13:58
Had to fly back to Belfast recently due to a family bereavement so booked a car online. At the car rental desk my Santander CC was refused, bloke apologised and said it happens so he tried it again and it was refused a second time. He then called for authorisation only to be told it was currently blocked. I paid with my debit card and left. Within two minutes of setting off from the airport I got a call from Santander to say they had blocked three attempted transactions at the same place in Co Antrim and did I know anything about it. The response was along the lines of 'yes you ******* muppet and now I've had to pay with another card, I'll ring when I get back to England.'
Got back the next day and phoned them. 'I just need to ask a few security questions sir. When was the last time you used the card?'
'Well I tried yesterday in NI but it was refused.'
'Sorry sir but I need to know when the last transaction was?'
'Apart from yesterday I can't remember, mmm, last June maybe.'
'Sorry sir that's not a good enough answer, when have you used it in the last ten days?'
'I haven't, apart from trying at the Sixt car rental desk.'
'OK sir let's try another, what's the balance on the card.':ugh:
'Nothing, zero, bugger all.'
'Mmm, ok, when did you clear the balance?'
'Last June.'
'And how much did you pay off the card?'
'How the f**k am I supposed to remember that?'
'Sorry sir, you've failed the security questions, we can't proceed with the call.'
'I don't want to proceed with the call, I just want a new card sending out to the address I have registered with you.'
'Sorry sir, I can't do that, goodbye.'
:mad::mad::mad::mad:

Good job I don't use credit cards much these days.

cockney steve
10th May 2013, 14:04
Totally concur with the comments about RBS.

Just had a letter with a bunch of booklets , telling me that, as from July, my overdraft facility (started at 200, interest free, now down to 100 and a string of charges) is to be reduced to 10 before ludicrous charges are imposed.

Just why do these cretins think they can charge 18% interest,whilst paying 1/2% or less, then adding charges, to exploit the small person, whilst gambling millions/billions of our cash on dodgy deals and creaming off huge bonuses from notional, not actually realised profits.

This customer is voting with his feet.

That amoral spiv. "Fred the shred" certainly shredded the ethics and morality of the old RBS.

A shame this tosser government doesn't grasp the nettle and regulate them properly.

bluecode
10th May 2013, 15:49
Yes banks curse them. We should applaud these people rather than jail them:

International criminal network steals $45m in world's 'biggest ATM fraud' - Americas - World - The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/international-criminal-network-steals-45m-in-worlds-biggest-atm-fraud-8610833.html)

cockney steve
10th May 2013, 18:54
Unfortunately, the Victim is not the banks or card processors, It's you and me, the little people who have no clout.

Old "joke" You owe the bank 40 grand, you worry, -owe them 40 million, they worry....hey ho, they just jack up the interest rates to the little people.

smug tw*t now running RBS tells Gov't that they're awash with money but the small businessman doesn't want to borrow it

Knobhead politicos can't work out that the lending criteria are too prohibitive and the interest rate is obscene.
Time was when they were happy to take ~4% margin ...now it's into double figures to help us pay for their reckless lending to fat-cats and dipping their hands in the till for wages and bonuses that were based on profits only on paper.....but funny how those "losses" all magically crystallised when everything went TU !

bank manager....fellow who lends you an umbrella when the sun is shining and snatches it back at the first drop of rain.

I have lost all respect for the profession....ranks with double-glazing and time-share salesmen (just below Estate-agents)

Ozzy
10th May 2013, 20:07
When a bank calls you asking sh!t questions tell them you are charging them one pound per minute then keep them on the phone as long as you can. Submit an invoice. When they don't pay. Take the bastards to small claims court.

Ozzy

Keef
10th May 2013, 23:07
One of my credit card companies has got it sussed. When there's one of those "unusual transactions" to investigate - and some have been fraudulent, so good for them - they ring me, tell me who they are, and ask me if I am able to call the number on the back of my credit card. None of the "we must take you through security" rhubarb that some ask when they call you.

On the basis I'm on the telephone to them, and the card's usually in my pocket, I can call them straight back. We do the security thing (and they don't ask silly questions where I wouldn't know the answer).

That's the card I use all the time these days.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
10th May 2013, 23:20
and it isn't advertising if you answer the question
"which company is that, please?"

ExSp33db1rd
12th May 2013, 08:26
But I'm usually answered by the wrong person, go through the security questions first tho' and then told that 'they' will transfer you to the right person - who then asks the security questions again Grrrr.

Partly my fault, I refuse to play games with "Digital Doris" who answers the phone then pretends that "she" can understand "certain' requests. I usually rattle the zero key quickly a few times, and "Doris" says she doesn't understand. pls. try again, and at the second go offers to get a human to help, this of course is someone who hasn't the faintest idea what I need, but instead of transferring me, first insists on the security crap.

Living in NZ my wife has occasional reason to call a USA bank, they eventually claim that they can't help, but next time she is passing please call into the branch. My wife explains that she is in NZ, Oh! they say, that's nice, we saw Lord of the Rings. what time is it ? well, next time you are passing just pop in - :ugh: Grrrr.

Occasionally my wife is telephoned from the USA, and asks for the return phone number, Oh! just dial 1-800 XXX, no says my wife, I live overseas, can't dial that, can I have your area code and number, Oh! don't bother with that, just dial 1-800 etc. Does nobody ever listen ? :ugh:

( actually, we often can dial the 1-800 stuff on Skype - if we can get Skype to connect, often a challenge )

Saintsman
12th May 2013, 17:20
I had a problem with Tesco, who p*ssed me off by making me go round in circles when they had sent me a letter to call them.

Instead of closing the account, I left a nominal sum in and no longer use it.

Every month they have to send me a statement, which costs them money. Must be a couple of years by now.

Kelly Hopper
12th May 2013, 18:22
Internet banking now requires an sms sent to my mobile phone with a code to complete the transaction. But the number on file is an old "dead" number. In order to change the number simply go on-line and complete the personal details changing what is necessary. To finalise the changes enter the code we have sent to your mobile phone!!! :{ You couldn't make this stuff up.

Santander on the other hand refused overseas use. Upon contact with them they advise that all I need to do is advise them of my overseas travel in advance giving the country I will be visiting and the dates overseas.

"I am aircrew, I advise. I am in different countries all the time with no advance notice of when, where, etc."

"We can't help you then." Was the response.

Banks! [email protected]@king useless! :yuk:

crippen
12th May 2013, 18:28
Internet banking now requires an sms sent to my mobile phone with a code to complete the transaction.

My Bank would not send the sms to a (foreign) Thai Phone,so they posted a letter to my home address in the U.K. I....s !