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Uncle Fred
8th May 2013, 17:22
One of the truly small and insignificant things in life but as Mrs. UF and I were discussing the other day--what is the reason behind the need to use more than one name?

Haley Joel Osment? Gerad Manley Hopkins? A.J.P. Taylor? Samuel L. Jackson? William Randoff Hearst Junior? In the later case why not just "Bill?"

Would their friends and parents not have been able to recognize them without such lengthy sobriquets? Did Hopkin's mother just not say "Ok Gerry, get cleaned up before dinner?" If so, then why the use of the full name? Was there perhaps more than one Gerad Hopkins in his village? Did they look so much alike as to be indistinguishable?

I can understand if someone has been elevated and is addressed as "Sir Robert" (or Sir "Bob" as some would prefer) but that is a special case.

Again, not anything too important but one colleague recommended the "pitch" test. What was the lad called by his chums on the athletic pitch as a youth? If "Ford Maddox Ford" was simply called "Ford" then that should be it!

Of course Sean Penn brought the concept of simplicity and equality of address to one of his roles when he simply used the moniker of "dude" for everyone. Perhaps that was, in its own way and in its own time, a visceral satirical spoof of the pretension among those with lofty and lengthy names. I know that many do not subscribe to such succinctness of appellation but it does rather fit no? Such as in "this dude was blocking the line at security this morning" or "This dude flew his restored Hawker into the aerodrome."

Other examples of lengthy names that get on the nerves? IMHO the absolute most grating of all was the golfer Davis Love III. No one has even the remotest idea of who I and II were but this gent always had to be referred by the full title.

I.R.PIRATE
8th May 2013, 17:32
Agreed. Poncey and pointless.

Victor Inox
8th May 2013, 17:45
I happened to notice that even soccer players, not usually recruited from the double-barrel brigade, have started using hyphenated names. One who springs to mind is a guy who calls himself Oxlade-Chamberlain, but one wonders what his true pedigree is.

rgbrock1
8th May 2013, 18:06
I've noted that people who refer to themselves as such are usually the same who sip Caramel or Peppermint Lattes' at the local Starbucks, with a pinkie finger stuck up in the air.

And their heads permanently stuck up their ass.

A A Gruntpuddock
8th May 2013, 18:13
Pretentious, moi?

Mike X
8th May 2013, 18:14
I've noted that people who refer to themselves as such are usually the same who sip Caramel or Peppermint Lattes' at the local Starbucks, with a pinkie finger stuck up in the air.

And their heads permanently stuck up their ass.

On the knob, rgb.


P.S. The "X" in my username is completely unrelated.

tony draper
8th May 2013, 18:18
Soccer players? most of them have names I cant even pronounce these days,
Middle names aren't bad,twere a way of passing down names through the family,I have one but nobody but me mum knew what it was and I certainly int telling you lot.
:rolleyes:

Mike X
8th May 2013, 18:24
O.K. Captain. What yer think a new thread calling alls middle names ?

Sounds good to me. Weed out them big-breasted fellas or what ?

Fareastdriver
8th May 2013, 18:25
I've got three names;------and three rich uncles.

tony draper
8th May 2013, 18:33
Considering what some of the feckwits in the world of celebrity name their cubs our middle names are mild,read somewhere recently that New Zealand has actually banned seventy names from being used, I'll see if I can find the article again.
:)
Ah! here it be.
These 71 names were so bad that New Zealand had to ban them | GlobalPost (http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/quick-click/these-names-were-so-bad-new-zealand-had-ban-them)

M.Mouse
8th May 2013, 18:36
Double barrelled surnames used to be the preserve of the aristocracy in the UK. A bit like only the immensely wealthy used to have the ludicrously named 'personal' number plates.

Now the DVLA and others make a small fortune out of the knobs who want the vanity of one of these plates and similarly everybody and their dog now seems to be opting for double barrelled surnames.

Loses something along the way in my book.

Capetonian
8th May 2013, 18:47
Depends on nationality. In Brazil names like Maria Madalena Paola Roberta Rodrigo Guimares e Silva are quite common as they seem to have the names of the preceding few generations tacked on (how tacky is that?). Then when they are of East European, Japanese or German descent they become even worse ...... Maria Madalena Paola Roberta Rodrigo Guimares e Silva von Hauptfleisch und Schmetterling/Yakimoto/Ferenczay. I may be exaggerating slightly.

All Spanish people have two surnames, the patronymic and the matronymic, thus their surnames change with each generation. The 'pijos' (snobs) often tack on hubby's name/s when they marry, so you could get Ana Maria del Rosario Rodriguez Lopez de Sanchez y Fernandez (or something like that.)

Soccer players? most of them have names I cant even pronounce these days,Nor can they, ignorant prats.

Reminds me of the delightfully named Concha de la Calle, a real name. You can Google the name and see who she is, poor lady! It means 'shell of the street' in Castillian Spanish but in most of Spanish speaking South America 'concha' is the c-word and as offensive to them as it is in English to us. For some reason the Spanish 'coño', meaning the same is not considered nearly as offensive.

Uncle Fred
8th May 2013, 19:05
If anyone cares to make something of that, then I'll happily discuss it with them. Probably outside.


Quite sorry Gobona but probably no one on this thread is interested in falling for your overt penchant and desire for violence in this matter. Shanking and blasting are right out in this chat.


Apart from a few references here on the thread no one is implying that a wife who retains a maiden name is pretentious. If you look at the examples that i listed in my original post you will not find a single hyphenated female. I think it begs the obvious that most readers knew exactly what I was talking about--gents (and it seems to be a preponderance of gents) who use long names--names that DO NOT reflect familial lineage.

If you are looking for fighting, there are a number of areas in the Metropolis alone that on a weekend eve are often the scenes of violence.


As for the names...even Wodehouse gave them a good send up e.g., Claude Cattermole “Catsmeat” Potter-Pirbright etc.

500N
8th May 2013, 19:12
Cap

IMHO, it is not a problem how many names people have,
it's what gets presented to the public or how you introduce
yourself.

Have 5, 6 or 10 names by all means but why not just
go around day to day as "Maria Silva" ?

Capetonian
8th May 2013, 19:13
Most of the male users of long multi-part names are, errm, wearers of baseball caps, backwards - in both senses of the word.

charliegolf
8th May 2013, 19:13
My special pet peeve is the redundant initial up front, eg H Kevin Williams, or J Arthur Rank. Gets under me skin it do.

CG

G-CPTN
8th May 2013, 19:22
the redundant initial up front
Some people adopt their middle name, however this can cause confusion with officialdom which asks "What is your first name?" and, sometimes, insists that this be used to the detriment of understanding and recognition by those who are personally acquainted with the subject.

rgbrock1
8th May 2013, 19:26
Capetonian wrote:

Most of the male users of long multi-part names are, errm, wearers of baseball caps, backwards - in both senses of the word.You mean like my homeboys, my home slices?

http://socialproblemsucd.wikispaces.com/file/view/gang20members.jpg/86097997/gang20members.jpg

As you can see, only one has the baseball cap on backwards. The other 3 can't afford a baseball cap and haven't, yet, killed someone for theirs.

Hobo
8th May 2013, 19:32
Jesus H. Christ

Uncle Fred
8th May 2013, 19:37
I have to say that some of these names from Wodehouse are quite amusing.

List of P. G. Wodehouse characters - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_P._G._Wodehouse_characters#Bertie.27s_relations)

IJM
8th May 2013, 19:51
I was always a fan of Peter O'Hanraha-hanrahan from The Day Today (Chris Morris's show from a few years back).

zetec2
8th May 2013, 20:01
Was always led to believe that when a child was born as the result of the Mother not knowing the name of those who had actually impregnated her she adopted the surnames of the most likely candidates, was told to me by an old lady who had been in service & this was how the below stairs maids etc who had been had by the Master dealt with it, true or not I don't know but it did upset a certain person who I worked with at CSE many years ago who had a double barrelled name & ideas above his station , enough said for now !, PH.

chuks
8th May 2013, 20:12
Used to be, for a Roman Catholic baptism, you needed two saints' names: "Joseph Francis Bloggs," for instance. Nothing pretentious there.

My wife, also very down to earth, has "First name, second proper name, third proper name, her family name-my family name."

Our children have just "first name, my family name."

Gussie Fink-Nottle... priceless!

Jesus was just plain "Jesus." He was "the Christ," and, as far as we know, had no middle initial.

500N
8th May 2013, 20:16
" Jesus was just plain "Jesus." He was "the Christ," and, as far as we know, had no middle initial."


Plenty of people have added "fcuking" as his middle name though :O

Tankertrashnav
8th May 2013, 20:18
Leone Sextus Denys Oswolf Fraudatifilius Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet Tollemache-Tollemache




That chap was an army officer who died of influenza while on active service with the Leicestershire Regiment in 1917.

Pity really, he had survived three years in the trenches because there wasn't a bullet big enough to have his name on it!

Edited because that flipping gremlin that puts your posts in the wrong time order has struck again. This was in response to G & T's post a bit further down the page!

Loose rivets
8th May 2013, 20:37
I'm guessing Drape's middle name is, Endeavour.

Anyone know who else has that very secret (fictional) middle name?



In recent years I was thrilled to make contact with an American girl I'd not seen since my teens. She was going to marry a pal of mine, but her parents didn't approve. Just one of the things they wanted for her was a double-barreled name. She rebelled, but found herself in a disastrous alternative marriage. A truly sad tale.


Ancestors on my father's side all had the same two given names. I looked in disbelief when one night I discovered the son of a rebel. The two names were swapped.


Hollered from the fireside to the Rivetess one night. "When my book's finished, what should I call myself? Loose X Rivets, or plain old X rivets. ( I use my middle name.)

Without missing a beat, she said, "If you want to sell it, Arther D Clarke."





Python did a good sketch. Posh bloke with a mile long nameplate on his desk - part of which was luxury Yacht.



Signed, A Whilom Nimble Brain

G&T ice n slice
8th May 2013, 20:40
I've always thought this had a nice swing to it

Leone Sextus Denys Oswolf Fraudatifilius Tollemache-Tollemache de Orellana Plantagenet Tollemache-Tollemache

or possibly

Lyulph Ydwallo Odin Nestor Egbert Lyonel Toedmag Hugh Erchenwyne Saxon Esa Cromwell Orma Nevill Dysart Plantagenet Tollemache-Tollemache

but I'm not keen on
Adolph Blaine Charles David Earl Frederick Gerald Hubert Irvin John Kenneth Lloyd Martin Nero Oliver Paul Quincy Randolph Sherman Thomas Uncas Victor William Xerxes Yancy Zeus Wolfeschlegelsteinhausenbergerdorff

But this one is of someone important
Reginald Aylmer Ranfurly Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax

And here's one with all the titles:
María del Rosario Cayetana Paloma Alfonsa Victoria Eugenia Fernanda Teresa Francisca de Paula Lourdes Antonia Josefa Fausta Rita Castor Dorotea Santa Esperanza Fitz-James Stuart, Silva, Falcó y Gurtubay
Duchess of Alba, Duchess of Aliaga, Duchess of Arjona, Duchess of Berwick, Duchess of Híjar, Duchess of Liria and Jérica, Duchess of Montoro, Countess-Duchess of Olivares, Marquise of the Carpio, Marquise of San Vicente del Barco, Marquise of La Algaba, Marquise of Almenara, Marquise of Barcarrota, Marquise of Castañeda, Marquise of Coria, Marquise of Eliche, Marquise of Mirallo, Marquise of la Mota, Marquise of Moya, Marquise of Orani, Marquise of Osera, Marquise of San Leonardo, Marquise of Sarria, Marquise of Tarazona, Marquise of Valdunquillo, Marquise of Villanueva del Fresno, Marquise of Villanueva del Río, Countess of Aranda, Countess of Lemos, Countess of Lerín, Constabless of Navarre, Countess of Miranda del Castañar, Countess of Monterrey, Countess of Osorno, Countess of Palma del Río, Countess of Salvatierra, Countess of Siruela, Countess of Andrade, Countess of Ayala, Countess of Casarrubios del Monte, Countess of Fuentes de Valdepero, Countess of Fuentidueña, Countess of Galve, Countess of Gelves, Countess of Guimerá, Countess of Modica (Kingdom of Sicily), Countess of Ribadeo, Countess of San Esteban de Gormaz, Countess of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Countess of Villalba, Viscountess of la Calzada, Lady of Moguer

ShyTorque
8th May 2013, 20:43
We once considered double-barrelling my family surname with that of my wife's maiden name. The reason was that there are less than 35 people with her surname and it will probably disappear as these days they only seem to produce girls.

Trouble was, she wanted her name first and I was having none of that, I can tell you; her maiden name was Fishface....

No, not really ;)

Loose rivets
8th May 2013, 20:51
Plenty of people have added "fcuking" as his middle name though


I've heard two of my friends say that, and I hate it. In fact, in my book I have the atheist protagonist slowly being weaned from his cussing. The folks doing the weaning know who he's going to meet, and blaspheming would not go down at all well.

In the real world, I just move away from my pals, just in case they're struck by lightening.

G-CPTN
8th May 2013, 20:56
Endeavour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inspector_Morse).

tony draper
8th May 2013, 21:05
I think we should be able to change our names at age 21 to a one more suitable to our personality.
I would have been 'Lance Claymore',it has a certain ring to it.
:rolleyes:

charliegolf
8th May 2013, 21:09
Trouble was, she wanted her name first and I was having none of that, I can tell you; her maiden name was Fishface....

Woulda sounded like an angling mag!

CG

G-CPTN
8th May 2013, 21:14
Families in Denmark don't name their babies from birth, but wait until the child has developed its own character before choosing a suitable name. Until then the child is referred to as 'Baby'.

Arm out the window
8th May 2013, 21:30
It seems from my research (the credits of older Yank TV and movies), the go was to use your first initial, then your middle name, so you wouldn't be John P. Finkelstein, you would be J.Percival Finkelstein.

Also they apparently liked perpetuating the patriarch's name, giving you names like H.Thurston Schmatz I, II, III and IV. I wonder what the record is for the highest number in a row?

The women, again from what I glean, often go by first name-maiden surname-married surname. So if you were born Marsha Brady and you married Chuck Neidermeyer, you would call yourself Marsha Brady Neidermeyer. Not a bad one, I think, as it keeps a bit of family connection going on.

SpringHeeledJack
8th May 2013, 21:39
Double barreled surnames raise my hackles for some reason, perhaps I'm envious ? What is the etiquette when Rupert Cuthbert-St John Smythe marries Jacusta Ponsenby-Threapwaite ? Are the kids then 4 surnamed :confused: As has been said, it's not how many names one has, but what one presents to the public. A chap I knew obliquely, had the surnames of every member of his father's favorite football team after his christian name and before his surname.....:} It never saw the light of day, he remained Joe Bloggs, but the elongated name remained official nonetheless.


SHJ

tony draper
8th May 2013, 21:41
I understand a lot of the very strange surnames that abound in the USA is due to the immigration chaps at Ellis Island just spelling out the foreign names they were given phonetically.
Also read somewhere that some of the strange names seen in Movie Credits were just names adopted by people in the industry so they would stick out on said credits.
:)

I.R.PIRATE
8th May 2013, 21:48
I think some of us are missing the point. Its not about having double-barreled monikers, its how you use them.

The Haley Joel Osments of the world for example.

Yes thats your name, but why must everyone use your middle name?

500N
8th May 2013, 21:50
IRP

Exactly.

As I said on Page 1.

tony draper
8th May 2013, 21:53
I dunno,Wild Bill Hickok had a cool first name.:rolleyes:

Fitter2
8th May 2013, 21:53
Middle names (or initials) have their uses. At least six generations of my family tree have the same first name and surname, the middle name(s) identify the one in question for documentary purposes.

We could be accused of lack of imagination. My eldest son only has daughters, so it looks like that line has ended.

Uncle Fred
8th May 2013, 21:57
I think some of us are missing the point. Its not about having double-barreled monikers, its how you use them.

The Haley Joel Osments of the world for example.

Yes thats your name, but why must everyone use your middle name?


Exactly Pirate. Exactly. Some are fitting. Wild Bill. Cool Hand Luke etc. It is, as you so stated, a matter of how one uses them. If you are a professor at an Oxbridge university in the 50s/60s/70s do you really need A.J.P. before your last name of Taylor for identification?

Blacksheep
8th May 2013, 22:04
Jesus was just plain "Jesus." He was "the Christ," and, as far as we know, had no middle initial.Not quite so simple: his middle name - like all of his male compatriots - was "Ben". As in Jesus ben Joseph to use the anglicised way of writing it.

Hydromet
8th May 2013, 22:16
I won my first name from a Grandfather, and it appears that my middle name is where I was conceived. My Granddaughter has only one name, which is an abbreviation of a common given name, and I suspect may also be an abbreviation of where she was conceived.

Family tradition perhaps?

ExSp33db1rd
8th May 2013, 22:29
I only have two names, a short forename and a long surname.

My mother wanted to add a second "christian" name ( yes, we are for those who might think I'm being Religious/Racist ) which has a difficult spelling - not repeated here in case I offend those who also bear it - so my dad asked my passing, then six year old. cousin how to spell the name. He got it wrong ( it involved an i and an e in the correct order ) so my dad reckoned I'd be getting the cane at school for misspelling my own name, and reckoned that with a long surname I was better off with just one four letter first name.

I thank him every time I have to fill in a form.

pigboat
8th May 2013, 22:35
Jesus was just plain "Jesus." He was "the Christ," and, as far as we know, had no middle initial.
Why did they give him a Spanish name?

TWT
8th May 2013, 22:45
A lot of Indonesians just use a one word name.

parabellum
8th May 2013, 23:26
Double Barreled surnames - 1. The acknowledgment of a bastard son by a nobleman, one quarter of the shield had a coat of arms with a cross over it.

2. To secure the wife's rights over property when she had the money and he had the name, (at one time, on marriage, a wife's assets automatically became her husbands).

3.To continue the surname of the wife's family, (no brothers or uncles).

4. In our case, my grandfather agreed to add the clan chiefs name to the first born son, (my father), as the clan chief had no male descendants or brothers. Clan chief lent grandfather GBP 300.00, around 1882, to buy surgical instruments and a donkey for transport after GF qualified at Edinburgh University as a surgeon.

Watching the credits of old films shown to forces overseas always wondered if 'Gladys Boot' was her real name

Arm out the window
9th May 2013, 01:44
Q: What do Winnie the Pooh and Attilla the Hun have in common?
A: The same middle name.

Msunduzi
9th May 2013, 05:03
In the Philippines it is usual to have the mothers maiden name as a middle name, to me it shows that the mother was married (it is still considered to be shameful there to have a child and not be married)

But long names can be amusing, I went to the Post Office with my first wife to send a registered letter. The clerk said (not asked) full name, to which my wife replied "do you want all my names" (the space on the form was about 2" long) to which the clerk replied "I said full name didn't I" So she got it ......Anna Jacoba Alida Petronella *******-******

The look on her face made up for her attitude.

We have a double-barreled name, which our family did not use until we went to SA, who when checking the application forms, found the full name in the records here, so we had to use it!

I thought it was traditional to have two Christian names, never thought anything of it.

Still don't see anthing in it apart from a name.

toffeez
9th May 2013, 05:34
The American habit of informing the world of a person's nickname is more irritating.

Even on company documentation one can find "Stephen (Steve) Sideburns" and "Charles (Chuck) Chopsticks".

Friends and family already know, and others don't need to know.

ExRAFRadar
9th May 2013, 06:17
Few posts back someone mentioned we should change our name if we want to.

I always liked Max Power (from a Simpsons episode)

Loose rivets
9th May 2013, 06:32
I would hate to be called Babe Ruth. Too silly.


Still, better that, than the name of a Nigerian Gentleman who sold me a very nice car (in London). His name was, (Religious name), X, ******. When I tried all sorts of ways of not quite saying it, his men put me right. It was not One Car, or Wwwww anker, or Wa n ker, it was plain old ******.

500N
9th May 2013, 06:35
What about the singers.

One of them was on the TV the other night.

Will i. am.

treadigraph
9th May 2013, 06:38
Loose Rivets: meanwhile in Nevada there presides this lady (http://nvbar.org/articles/content/judicial-profile-hon-kimberly-******)...


Edit...

Always found the American habit of calling people Mary Sue, Billy Bob, etc. rather odd. But then my mother is Helen to most people, June to several of her siblings and Helen June to another...

Someone I know has a double barrelled surname. He claims that he knew his first marriage was doomed when his wife hyphenated her forenames shortly after the wedding.

Capetonian
9th May 2013, 06:48
Loose Rivets: meanwhile in Nevada there presides this lady...

She does have an odd name :
Page not found
The requested page could not be found.

I had a bit of totty once called Paige, she liked being turned over, but eventually she came apart at the spine.

blue up
9th May 2013, 07:22
I went to school with Jane Witherwye-Elliot.

I only found out about 15 years later that it was JaYne (With a 'Y') :ugh:

Capetonian
9th May 2013, 07:40
These are two different versions of a Rowan Atkinson classic about names.
FiWJWLCoH2M

V2vocjqDGu4 (start at 0:20 to avoid 20 seconds of pointless noise)

cattletruck
9th May 2013, 07:46
Multiple names are pretentious. When anyone mentioned the name Noggin at school everyone knew exactly who you were talking about. Even the teachers called him Noggin. Noggin was a sports legends too, and eventually joined the police force where he had to referred to as Officer Noggin (only amongst us :E), which was just way too pretentious.

treadigraph
9th May 2013, 07:51
She does have an odd name :
Page not found
The requested page could not be found.




Ah, I see even the hyperlink has been sanitised... :\

If you really wish to read all about the lady concerned, change the asterisks to a well know six letter word starting with W and ending in R, associated with self-pleasuring...

Cacophonix
9th May 2013, 07:56
I suppose if your forebears chose to amalgamate surnames then you are just doomed to look pretentious. You can of course change your name by deed poll but it is inconvenient and often causes offence in families.

As for second, third or even fourth names I have a pretty ordinary first name but my mother went to town in her choice of multiple names thereafter that caused me no end of trouble and fights at school. I suspect she did it on purpose for reasons similar to the theme in the song "A Boy Named Sue"...

Thanks mom!

Caco

david1300
9th May 2013, 07:57
...My Granddaughter has only one name, which is an abbreviation of a common given name, and I suspect may also be an abbreviation of where she was conceived.

Family tradition perhaps?
So, put us out of our misery - what is her name:p
Hay(ley) (Hayshed)
Pat(tricia) (Patio)
Hall(e) (Hallway)

Or one of these less likely ones?
Kit(chen)
Bed(room)
Fire(escape)
Mini(minor)

MagnusP
9th May 2013, 08:54
I have maternal grandfather's first name, then father's first name, then parents' married name. I only use the middle name when filling out forms that demand it, but sign with the middle initial, a habit installed by teachers in the mid-1960s who insisted it would help avoid confusion when marking exam papers. I knew for a fact there weren't any other kids called Magnus at the school, let alone with the same surname, but the habit stuck.

MrsP rarely uses her middle name as she can never remember whether it's spelled "Ann" or "Anne". (It's "Anne", BTW)

Exascot
9th May 2013, 09:11
There are only two in the world with my surname. I am married to the other one. A search in Google gives us about the first 300 hits. It is strictly speaking quadruple barreled but I normally push the last three together for ease.

There are constant difficulties though. It is amazing how many young people don't know what a hyphen is when spelling your name. Also many computers will not accept a hyphen in a name. My name on all airline tickets is not the same as on my passport.

Ordering items on line is difficult as the forms will not accept a hyphen then the name doesn't match the name on my credit card.

So please don't take the P... it is a constant problem. Also the police can find me very easily :{

tony draper
9th May 2013, 09:19
Knew a bloke who drank in me local who was known by everyone as Ronnie the Burglar,he used to have probs with the police as well.
:uhoh:

Cacophonix
9th May 2013, 09:23
Ronnie the Burglar

Diamond geezer!

Ronnie Le Burglar - Pretentious [email protected]

Caco

MagnusP
9th May 2013, 09:24
A few years ago, there was a moderately unsuccessful burglar with a gammy leg in Edinburgh. Even the police knew him as Limpy. Identification was rarely a problem, and my brother's power tools were back in the garage in a day or so.

rgbrock1
9th May 2013, 12:27
chuks and 500N wrote:

" Jesus was just plain "Jesus." He was "the Christ," and, as far as we know, had no middle initial."


Plenty of people have added "fcuking" as his middle name though http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/embarass.gif

Chuks. I thought his middle name was Henry? Jesus Henry Christ.

500N. You're going to hell for that last one. In a hand basket.
See ya there!

rgbrock1
9th May 2013, 12:28
toffeez wrote:

The American habit of informing the world of a person's nickname is more irritating.

Even on company documentation one can find "Stephen (Steve) Sideburns" and "Charles (Chuck) Chopsticks".

Friends and family already know, and others don't need to know.

Seemed to work out quite well for Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, no?

cockney steve
9th May 2013, 14:56
Woman walks into doctor's surgery with 16 kids and pandemonium ensues.
Doctor comes out of consulting-room, assesses the situation and asks the woman to control the rabble.....She takes a deep breath, yells," MICK...sit down and shut up " the entire tribe immediately comply.
Doctor is astonished by this and ushers her into the consulting-room.

"Tell me, are they all yours?... "Yes Doctor"..."but you only called Mick"... Yes, doctor, all the girls are Michaela and all the boys are Michael, so I only have to call once and they all comply". Doc puzzles for a moment , then says," but what if you only want one of them?"

"Ah, well, then I use their Surname"


Python sketch....It's Spelt " Throat-warbler Mangrove",- but pronounced " Luxury-Yacht"

Sailor Vee
9th May 2013, 15:38
Well, there's always Sir Ranulph Twistleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, Bt. OBE, who is gradually losing his fingers to very cold climates.

G&T ice n slice
9th May 2013, 21:22
Tarquin Fin-tim-lin-bin-whin-bim-lim-bus-stop-F'tang-F'tang-Olé-Biscuitbarrel

or has someone already used that one?

tony draper
9th May 2013, 21:51
Geographical locations became popular as girls names about 12 years back,frinstance 'Jordan',they are easy to spot in the street as most of them are pregnant now.
:rolleyes:

Arm out the window
9th May 2013, 22:09
Seemed to work out quite well for Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, no?

Their nicknames were kept very quiet - Steve Jobs was known as 'Dirty' and Bill Gates was 'Flood'.

Actually, I made those up, but it would have been good. There's some bullshit TV 'doctor' selling rejuvenating treatments of some kind calling himself Doctor Ho - I like to think his nickname is 'Skanky'.

ShyTorque
9th May 2013, 22:14
Having posted earlier about my wife's maiden name being likely to "die out" due to there being less than thirty five of them remaining, I've just discovered that my son's wife to be has the same problem. There's only thirty one with her surname!

I don't see how they could double barrel their names - it would be too cumbersome a tongue-twister.

onetrack
10th May 2013, 00:32
Used to know a bloke who walked around with a rabbit stuck up his arse. His name was Warren, of course. :)

Ascend Charlie
10th May 2013, 01:43
The Yanks are famous for their lack of imagination.

Elmo M. Zumwalt couldn't think of a name for his kid, so called him Elmo M. Zumwalt Junior. He went on to be an Admiral in the navy.

Eugene P. Rosenblatt was the same, and his son was also lacking imagination as well, so there was at least Eugene P. Rosenblatt III, this was 30 years ago, they are probably up to the Fifth by now.

L. Ron Hubbard - did his friends call him L? Most of them are probably set to go there, if they haven't joined his secret society.

Ozzy
10th May 2013, 01:57
Not really pretentious, just a fate of birth. What I do take exception to, and women are going to fcuking kill me for this, is the need to double barrel the married name with the maiden name...never really got that...hey, but that's just me...each to their own...

Ozzy

parabellum
10th May 2013, 03:51
is the need to double barrel the married name with the maiden name...
Standard practice in Holland, the women retains her maiden name in her passport but it says who she is married to. If there is a divorce she immediately drops his name and reverts to her maiden name.

What really irritates me is when people talk about their 'partner' when they mean girl/boy friend, fiancé or husband/wife,:mad:

Krystal n chips
10th May 2013, 04:16
forget multiple names....other than the cousins habit of being creative as in Hyram J. Buffaloburger The Third, what's really pretentious are personalised number plates.

Although there is one such that I see on a regular basis...last three letters are FFS...which summates the owners of such plates nicely.

Richo77
10th May 2013, 04:35
Obviously Uncle Fred needs a freakin hobby. Who feckin cares?.

Uncle Fred
10th May 2013, 23:29
Ah, at my advanced age one still has hobbies but also has the luxury to make observations and ask others their opinions.

ExSp33db1rd
11th May 2013, 05:57
What really irritates me is when people talk about their 'partner' when they mean girl/boy friend, fiancé or husband/wife

That's come about as the result of all this 'same sex' nonsense. some 'boys' don't like talking about their 'boyfriend', Partner seems more acceptable - until said 'partner' turns up and then you know you've been conned.

NZ just gone for the same-sex-marriage thing, even allowing the terms Bride and Groom to be used in the same-sex marriage ceremony. World's Gone Mad.

Don't get me wrong, anyone can do, or think, what they like, be it relationships or religion, just don't involve me, and say it like it is, don't hide behind this 'partner' facade.

As the thread is about names, what do these same-sex couples do about choosing a common name - or don't they, in which case why bother getting 'married' - wot's wrong with the Civil Union concept.

Talking about concepts - - I seem to recall marriage ceremonies talking about marriage being for the procreation of children - Duh ! How exactly ?

B Fraser
11th May 2013, 07:03
what's really pretentious are personalised number plates.

The same disdain does not appear to apply to aircraft registrations. That has always puzzled me. I wanted a balloon with G-SPOT given that the retrieve crew were always looking for it.

One of these days, I will have G-OFYS.



:E work it out for yourselves

Exascot
11th May 2013, 08:06
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/32684975/G-SPOT.jpg

Capetonian
11th May 2013, 08:52
I'm thinking of registering one in the Isle of Man : M-YOFB, something I frequently fill in on forms.