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View Full Version : Coming Home - Return From War - US


rgbrock1
2nd May 2013, 14:41
As the US involvement in Iraq has basically ended (not totally but mostly) and US forces scheduled to be mostly withdrawn from Afghanistan next year, I thought I'd embed a short yoo-too-b video which is a compilation of US military returning unannounced for Iraq or Afghanistan thus surprising their loved ones. (I dare anyone not to become a bit, shall we say, misty eyed whilst watching!)

VKyaif6lgjs

West Coast
2nd May 2013, 15:02
Thanks RG, that was the best 5:34 of my day.

Matari
2nd May 2013, 15:55
Well that didn't take long, did it.

con-pilot
2nd May 2013, 16:01
Well that didn't take long, did it.

Nope, and not even one of the usual suspects either. :rolleyes:

Davaar
2nd May 2013, 16:21
(I dare anyone not to become a bit, shall we say, misty eyed whilst watching!)


Ummm! Well!!! I'm with Eclan. The dog seemed happy, though, without the screaming.

Ancient Mariner
2nd May 2013, 16:26
I have returned home a couple of times after periods between 6 to 12 months and the standard has been, "what's for dinner" followed by sex. These days I will sit down and have my dinner without questions. :(
Per

Lonewolf_50
2nd May 2013, 18:45
Navy homecomings

Many years ago, when there was no email and no Skype, sailors on ships were restricted to using mail, phone calls from a port, or the occasional telegram (transmitted via Class E message) to home.

One of the carriers got extended into a nine month deployment in the Arabian Sea, and headed home with no port visits. One of the gunners mates finally got his chance to send a Class Easy message to his wife, two days out, which he carefully worded:

"Kitty. Home soon. When you meet ship, have mattress strapped to back. Love. Jack."

He received a response via telex the following day:

"Jack. Be the first man off the ship. Love. Kitty."

PukinDog
2nd May 2013, 19:13
Awww, for those of you averse to American-style, gushy-gooey homecomings, here's something that will remind you of the joy-level exhibited by your loved ones when you walked in through the door...

http://www.kentuckytheater.com/wp-content/uploads/sound-of-music-children.jpg

West Coast
2nd May 2013, 20:09
After reading the replies here, I truly feel blessed to have not been born in a country that values the stiff upper lip to the point of denigrating a joyous occasion.

The thing is, I believe many of you when you piss on happy home comings such as the vid RG posted. It starts at the top with that silly royalty thing. I saw the queen years ago greet her then young grand children with a handshake after an extended absence. I can't fathom such a lifeless existence, but that's the choice some of you have chosen and embrace.

500N
2nd May 2013, 20:46
West coast

That is an interesting observation about the British
and you are right, taking the "stiff upper lip" that far
does detract from life.

And I am an admirer of the stiff upper lip being employed
in a lot of cases :ok:

The way the heroes have been returned to the UK via
Royal Wotton is maybe a changing of how things are
done in England - and for the better ?
The Queen obviously thought so with the granting of the
name "Royal".


Very good video RGB :ok:
Have always admired the way the US welcomes people home,
especially the heroes with highways lined for miles.

Lord Spandex Masher
2nd May 2013, 20:52
The stiff upper lip thing is what you see in public. Who knows how people behave in private.

That said I do think public appreciation of "heroes" is a good thing.

500N
2nd May 2013, 20:55
This is one of the fine examples of a US welcome home to a fallen hero.

A Hero's Welcome: Welcome home, Lance Cpl Franklin Namon Watson - YouTube

Davaar
2nd May 2013, 21:04
I saw the queen years ago greet her then young grand children with a handshake

I think, West, it was her then young eldest son.

Cheesy is not limited to the Americans.

We have a Governor-General here who celebrates Occasions-of-State, mincing with his spouse hand-in-hand. Cringe-making.

500N
2nd May 2013, 21:07
Davaar

Where is here ?


And what is "mincing" ?

tony draper
2nd May 2013, 21:12
I believe it's a marching gait particular to the USMC.:rolleyes:

West Coast
2nd May 2013, 21:15
500
I neglected to add that there is a time and place for the stiff upper lip, seeing loved ones after an extended absence ain't it tho.

500N
2nd May 2013, 21:19
Agree.


I think the Queen has lightened up in the last 10 years
and I think Kate will make the Royals lighten up even more.

West Coast
2nd May 2013, 21:28
While the whole royalty thing is laughable, she does bring an air of humanity to an otherwise drab exterior, except for the young git of course. I was a kid when Diana was new to the scene, she had the same likable quality as Kate.

toffeez
2nd May 2013, 21:32
Queen visits injured soldiers - ITV News (http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/story/2013-05-02/queens-visit-to-forces-rehab/)

500N
2nd May 2013, 21:38
West coast

Why do you think the Royals are laughable ?

I don't.

I think they add quite a lot to the UK.

tony draper
2nd May 2013, 21:38
While I agree with your post 17 Mr West what I think some of my generation find slightly cringeworthy is the videoing of what to most would be a private family moment then posting it on a public website like youtube
Mebbee it's a generation thing.
:uhoh:

Sailor Vee
2nd May 2013, 21:54
I think some people have their own definitions of the 'right or wrong' way to honour the victims of war. At least in modern days we can give whatever we believe to be our method, millions have died in other wars, but were never given any 'welcomings' at all.

Let's just show some respect for the troops that have paid the ultimate price for 'taking the King's shilling/President's dime'!

While agreeing it may be a generation thing, we Brits did the same sort of thing through Royal Bassett, just a lot less razzmatazz.

con-pilot
2nd May 2013, 21:58
Let's just show some respect for the troops that have paid the ultimate price for 'taking the King's shilling/President's dime'!

Well said sir. :ok:

500N
2nd May 2013, 22:03
Sailor

I wonder whether the way the US welcomes home people
- both alive and the fallen heroes - is not a reaction the other
way in view of what didn't happen during the Vietnam war ?

This type of reaction the other way often happens in Society.

tony draper
2nd May 2013, 22:05
I didn't watch the clips,I'm not talking about honoring the returned dead I thought this was about family greeting returned soldiers in their own homes not in public, I have watched a few on another website, as I said they strike me as family moments, as I also said mebbee it's a generation thing.

woptb
2nd May 2013, 22:12
Don't care if it's Corney or full of sacharin - I still found it both moving & uplifting & I think (unfortunately) we Brit's are wrapped way to tight !

rjtjrt
2nd May 2013, 23:00
I have always been an Anglophile, but I am appalled by many of the posted comments here.
The carping, smug and sanctimonious commentators are hopefully not representative of the majority of your people (and in my experience, from visiting and living in UK some years ago, it is not).
The comments I refer to say more about the posters than it does about the people in the video's, or those who took them and put them on the net.
If I am wrong about the majority of Brits, then the future for UK is bleak.

Sailor Vee
2nd May 2013, 23:23
N 500, don't forget the Vietnam war was a political decision taken against the spread of communism. (The Vietnamese call it the American War). It was unpopular when it began and stayed that way.

Contrast that against Iraq and the 'stan, both of which were/are fuelled by feelings of some way of 'hitting back' directed at an enemy that had done huge damage to the US.

11Fan
2nd May 2013, 23:42
Damn Santa Ana winds are kicking up dust in Southern California this afternoon.

mini
2nd May 2013, 23:48
Whatever else you may say against the Cousins, they are stand out when it comes to recognising military service.

They may be crap on the back up side of things, like the rest of us, but they do the respect thing very well.

mini, hole in his leg, get on with it...

Davaar
3rd May 2013, 00:14
500.

"Here" is Canada.

"mince", v.i., "walk with affected delicacy" (COED, 7th ed.)

lomapaseo
3rd May 2013, 00:19
Cheesy ???

How can a 5 YO act cheesy?

and a dog knows no better than true love

well the cat is definitely a Mino thing :E

West Coast
3rd May 2013, 00:21
500

It's to do with them serving no real purpose. I'm being generous to call the queen the titular head of state, really she and the rest of her ilk are there for ceremonial ribbon cutting ceremonies and to draw the tourists in. She can't even cut anyone's head off like in the good old days when for better or worse royalty was the real center of power. Save the bandwidth about the royal assent clause, largely another ceremonial function.

The UK would be better off de-funding the royals at a minimum, saving about 13 million a year to the taxpayers. At the other end of the spectrum, simply eliminate the royals. They could likely get by on the hundreds of millions they have banked and in real estate, at least till they are pensioners and back on the government dole again.

Polikarpov
3rd May 2013, 00:42
a) The Royals are cheap considering the job they do promoting the country for tourists / trade etc. Certainly far better value than the countless millions the Government wazz up the wall paying for wind farms in Ghana, etc.

b) Having a Royal as head of state means no particular deference need be paid to politicians, unlike the Office of the President you chaps are generally quite polite about (even IF you think Barry is a pillock). No-one in the UK would think twice about calling Blair / Dave (delete per political leaning) a complete ****. Which would seem quite healthy.

c) I think Liz has done a stand-up job during her tenure.

West Coast
3rd May 2013, 01:04
You really must watch US politics, there is significant vitriol, with little decorum paid to any elected official.

Just what has Liz done? Good form on cutting the ribbon at the new Hospital? And of the rest of the clan? Getting butt ass naked in Vegas is a lot of fun (so I'm told) but does it really convey the dignity desired? Topless in the continent ( France of all places), running planes off the end of runways, that's all I remember off the top of me noggin.

500N
3rd May 2013, 01:20
"Just what has Liz done? Good form on cutting the ribbon at the new Hospital? And of the rest of the clan? Getting butt ass naked in Vegas is a lot of fun (so I'm told) but does it really convey the dignity desired? Topless in the continent ( France of all places), running planes off the end of runways, that's all I remember off the top of me noggin."

Liz - served during the war, others - fought wars (3 of the current royals),
the other two have served. OK, so a little topless sunbathing wasn't wise,
butt naked in LA, come on, many of us who have served have probably
done similar or worse. Running a plane off a runway ? Who cares. At least he didn't crash it (plane or car) and kill people like the Kennedy's :O


Talking of dignity, you can't exactly hold up US Presidents as shining lights,
I don't exactly see theft and fraud and a married president getting a blow job in the White house from a young woman as being full of dignity.

West Coast
3rd May 2013, 02:30
I fought in a war (GW1, the prequel) and whatever you'd prefer to call Somalia (FUBAR perhaps) but I'm no longer getting paid by the government for work completed long ago. The same doesn't apply to Liz I guess. Running a plane off the end, appears the RAF cared.

As far as not killing people, further proof they're really not legit royalty.

As far as the US presidency, perhaps but what does that have to do with the legitimacy of the royals? It doesn't, figured I'd save you the effort.

500N
3rd May 2013, 04:48
West Coast

No worries, was playing the devil's advocate.
Royals are like Politics :O

All good :ok:

probes
3rd May 2013, 05:06
Interesting. I thought the weirdest of weird has been more or less covered in JB, but a discussion about the appropriacy of being emotional when meeting someone one loves... hm.
As for uploading - why not? It's about the emotion, not that much about people. At least so I see it.

I have returned home a couple of times after periods between 6 to 12 months and the standard has been, "what's for dinner"
Sorry for you, seriously.

Ancient Mariner
3rd May 2013, 05:24
No need to be sorry for me, Probes. Wifey made sure I was. :(
Per

Tankertrashnav
3rd May 2013, 08:33
West Coast - be assured that the Brits welcome home their troops very enthusiastically. Living in the West Country where most of our Royal Marines are based, as well as the majority of the Royal Navy, we frequently see homecoming celebrations on our local TV news. In the case of ships there is an enthusiastic crowd of wives, kids etc at the dockside, with subsequent hugging, tears, and kids wearing sailor hats, etc, whilst the military units almost always have a parade through the nearest town to their base, watched by an enthusiastic cheering crowd.
We do it in our way, you do it in yours, but the general feeling of appreciation (and relief that loved ones have made it safely back home) is just as genuine.

rgbrock1
3rd May 2013, 12:12
500N wrote:

...and a married president getting a blow job in the White house from a young woman as being full of dignity.No, no dignity there. But I bet it felt damn good! :ok:

A word about the video, and related videos: keep in mind that these videos are filmed, ad hoc, whenever a service member returns home unannounced. The service member knows what's going on beforehand whilst the loved one(s) do not.

Also keep in mind that our servicemen, and women, returning from Vietnam did not receive this kind of welcome home for the most part. Many were actually spit upon, called baby killers, etc. Yes, it was a sign of the times but, still, no one thought the 'Nam vets deserved much in the form of accolades.

Our returning troops deserve the kind of recognition as shown in this video and others. Being apart from ones family or loved one(s) for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or even 6 tours of duty overseas is difficult at best. Is it no wonder, then, that emotion is exhibited upon their return?

Lonewolf_50
3rd May 2013, 12:31
West Coast, I see no reason to denigrate the royals. It's one of them things as makes the British so very British.

Different strokes for different folks.

brickhistory
3rd May 2013, 13:32
It's one of them things as makes the British so very British

Indeed.

As does, apparently, disdain as evidenced by several of the 'anti-'posts in this thread.

I must be getting old and remembering things incorrectly. I could've sworn I remember seeing reports, complete with crying wives and children, of emotional reunions following the return of UK military personel from the Falklands War and Gulf Wars I & II.

West Coast
3rd May 2013, 14:05
Tankertrashnav

I find that quite comforting to know some of your service members are greeted with enthusiasm. Hopefully the what's for dinner crowd are in the minority.

Lonewolf
While it's a Brit thing, though not exclusively as a number of other euro states have royalty, it's a vestige of the past and not always does it come with a positive connotation and currently comes with an increasingly expensive price tag. As a history buff, a nod to the past is appreciated but its time to relegate royalty to the history books. A growing, sizable percentage of the UK population are in agreement about abolishing the royal family. I have to believe it's simply a matter of time till that voting block is the majority given the rapid growth of their viewpoint.
At a very minimum, the royals should be cost neutral, if they generate as much revenue in tourism as is claimed, that should be the direct source of their income. Might make them work a wee bit harder to know income is tied to the success of their efforts as opposed to a guaranteed paycheck.

MagnusP
3rd May 2013, 14:31
A growing, sizable percentage of the UK population are in agreement about abolishing the royal family.

Interesting comment given that last year approval was at its highest since 1997.

rgbrock1
3rd May 2013, 14:34
West Coast:

Do keep in mind that the British are not the only country with royals. (I'm quite positive you know that already.) Would you suggest the abolishment of royalty in all countries as well?

Not trying to be a wise ass or anything, merely curious.

toffeez
3rd May 2013, 14:38
Since politicians are almost universally despised, why should we want one as head of state?

500N
3rd May 2013, 14:48
"A growing, sizable percentage of the UK population are in agreement about abolishing the royal family."

Magnus's comment applies to Australia as well.

And as toffeez said, who would want a Politician as head ?

Lonewolf_50
3rd May 2013, 15:00
Returning to the original thread, was there any trooth to the rumors that Koo Stark went all nympho on Prince Andrew when he got back from the Falklands? :E:}:hmm:

I seem to recall that this thread was about servicemen coming home from wars, not about royalty and its uses.

West Coast
3rd May 2013, 16:27
Rg
if they are ceremonial in nature and are a draw on the taxpayers, then yes.

Tankertrashnav
3rd May 2013, 16:40
A growing, sizable percentage of the UK population are in agreement about abolishing the royal family


I think you will find you are 180 degrees out there - the monarchy has never been so popular - certainly not in the last 40 - 50 years, at least. This is is no small measure due to a growing respect and admiration for The Queen. The republican voice here is far less voluble than it was, say, in the 1960s. The reason, dare I say, is that we look over the Channel (and the Atlantic) and dont find the alternative very appealing.


Might make them work a wee bit harder to know income is tied to the success of their efforts as opposed to a guaranteed paycheck.


How much harder would you have them work? At 87 and 91 the Queen and Prince Philip still work a busy schedule. At their age there must be many a morning when they'd rather stay home and relax but they have no choice but to get on and do what they undoubtedly see as their duty

Edited - Just read the link on 500N's post and I thought I'd make this offer. If any UK taxpayer on here doesn't reckon they are getting value from the royal family for the 65p p.a. it's costing them, send me their Paypal details (email address will do) and I'll happily send them 65p and they can relax in the knowledge that the royals have cost them nothing!

500N
3rd May 2013, 16:40
West Coast

Are they a draw ?

I had read something about them only costing under a pound per person.

But the question I wanted to know is how much they bring into the UK ?

Found this article. I have yet to cross reference the information for accuracy.

The True Cost Of The Royal Family Explained.. | Relentless 4 Life (http://relentlesslife.wordpress.com/2012/04/15/the-true-cost-of-the-royal-family-explained/)


Re getting rid of the royals, the UK would just end up like
the EU, full of bureaucrats and BS.

Davaar
3rd May 2013, 17:56
whenever a service member returns home unannounced.

................. to get carefully rehearsed maximum "Candid Camera" effect.

Davaar
3rd May 2013, 18:04
But the question I wanted to know is how much they bring into the UK ?


Don't really know. That said, I am sure it is a lot.

But far more than that, I remember the War and the unity and force The King brought to the nation. Churchill brought a lot, but The King was, as they say, something else.

I recall the words attributed to the late Queen Mother, when she was asked if the Royal Princesses were going to Canada. As I recall, they were:

The Princesses will not go unless I go.

And I shall not go unless the King goes.

And the King is not going.

SASless
3rd May 2013, 18:58
Well....I reckon there could be some Royal Rogering going on when the Lads return from the Sandbox. Does that tie it all together then?:E

Davaar
3rd May 2013, 20:09
....rumors that Koo Stark went all nympho

I always rather fancied Koo. Who can say how it would have turned out if only .....

Does the British aristocracy not have a long record of alliances with chorus girls who turned into magnificent duchesses?

On a more modest level I have known some -- Ah! Wild? Might one say? -- girls who latched on to staid surgeons, physicians, and the like, and in an instant,well maybe two instants, were battle-axe pillars of the community. The staid surgeons et al seemed pretty happy too.

If you ever have a chance to look at old parish records you may be amazed at the early girlish tricks of the local schoolma'rm.

con-pilot
3rd May 2013, 20:28
I rather like the Queen I do. Met her about a million years ago back when I was nine years old. I was under a instant death threat from my mother if I did anything embarrassing.

Hell, I practiced bowing for a month, then I forgot to because I was so nervous. I know I said something, but for the life of me I could never remember just what I said, but it was obviously not all that bad, as mother didn't kill me on the spot, or as soon as we got home. :uhoh:

500N
3rd May 2013, 20:48
Davaar

Funny you mention the King / Queen during the war.

My grand mother often said that the refusal of the Royal family
to leave Buckingham palace and put up with the Blitz was
very inspiring to Britain.


Tanker

Re the 65p, I think that article said that the Royal family actually
bring in far more money to the UK than they cost.

They are a big draw card to the UK.

rgbrock1
6th May 2013, 14:47
con wrote:

Hell, I practiced bowing for a month, then I forgot to because I was so nervous.

Probably a good thing, con. Can you imagine if you had bowed and then farted at that instant? A royal stinky at that!!!!

Tankertrashnav
6th May 2013, 17:21
Like the Earl of Oxford who ripped one off when making a low bow to Elizabeth the First. He was so mortified he went into self-imposed exile for seven years. When he eventually returned to court the queen greeted him with the words "Welcome, my lord, we have forgot the fart".

Poor sod!