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Loose rivets
25th Apr 2013, 21:15
. . . not to mention the materials contained in the debris. We need a parking space for it all.


BBC News - 'Urgent need' to remove space debris (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-22299403)

west lakes
25th Apr 2013, 21:20
Steptoe and Son meets NASA!!

500N
25th Apr 2013, 21:20
The question I have is there a simple way to make this debris have a
faster descent rate so that it collides with the earth atmosphere and
burns up on re entry ?

Or capture the smaller pieces and then make that package head
to earth at speed, again, burning up.

lomapaseo
25th Apr 2013, 21:44
The question I have is there a simple way to make this debris have a
faster descent rate so that it collides with the earth atmosphere and
burns up on re entry ?


I wouldn't fool with mother nature on this. The burn up rate is pretty much fixed.

If we could slow the stuff down a tad it would clear the orbit and after that we take our chances.

Considering the burn up rates and degradation of the piece sizes versus open land to fall on unnoticed the worst me might expect would be a couple of TWA800 meteror shoot down events

500N
25th Apr 2013, 21:51
lom

"I wouldn't fool with mother nature on this. The burn up rate is pretty much fixed.

Why wouldn't you fool with MN ?

And aren't you just nudging some of the bigger pieces so they
hit the earths atmosphere quicker, therefore less time in space
where something could collide with them ?


If we could slow the stuff down a tad it would clear the orbit
and after that we take our chances."

Can you explain "slow the stuff down" it would clear the orbit"
Not clear on what you mean by clear the orbit - isn't it still
going to be in space where it could collide with something ?
Or are you saying clear the orbit where most of what humans
do is located ?
.

Burnt Fishtrousers
26th Apr 2013, 12:50
make them magnetic...once the bits have come together to assume the size size of a small car its orbit will decay and it will fall to earth


Now all we have to do is determine what is a "bit" and what is a functioning satellite...bugger back to the drawing board

500N
26th Apr 2013, 12:53
Good point.

Stick a huge Rare earth Magnet in Space :O

G-CPTN
26th Apr 2013, 13:41
How about an oscillating laser beam?

Milo Minderbinder
26th Apr 2013, 13:57
you don't want it coming back down - too much chance it'll land on someone's head
far better to pack it all into empty fuel tanks or rocket bodies and push the whole lot in the direction of the sun

G-CPTN
26th Apr 2013, 14:15
push the whole lot in the direction of the sunIrresponsible!

What about all the other space-travellers?

Akin to dumping all our garbage on Antarctica!

(or in the oceans) :ugh:

Lon More
26th Apr 2013, 14:15
A very large Dyson required.

tony draper
26th Apr 2013, 14:34
Here's a interesting hypothetical for you,what would happen to all that kit zipping around in orbit if the Earth were to just up and disappear in the blink of a eye,poof!!as the French would say.
How would it behave?
:rolleyes:

chksix
26th Apr 2013, 15:58
The sun would swallow the earth without as much as a burp so I think it could be a nice furnace for all our future garbage.

Milo Minderbinder
26th Apr 2013, 16:03
thats what we should do with all our nuclear waste - launch it on rockets and lob it into the sun

Mac the Knife
26th Apr 2013, 16:28
Tony, without the Earth's gravitational attraction it'd all shoot off into space.

So the solution would be to shut off the Earths gravitational field for a few hours.

Mac

:ok:

Just tell everyone to hang on tight!

Ant
26th Apr 2013, 17:35
Well if it all gets dragged back down to earth sometime, can I bag the Hasselblad that astronaut Michael Collins let go of during a Gemini 10 spacewalk in 1966?

PS. my claim to fame... met astronaut Joe Allen once nearly 40 years ago.

Edited to ask:

If I DO get the Hasselblad and I post the roll of film off to Bonusprint (other postal film developers ARE available!), would Michael Collins' pix still be recoverable after half a century in orbit?
Just wonderin' is all.

Loose rivets
26th Apr 2013, 18:20
But . . . but . . . what about the OP, as in, Original Point?


Small car? 30,000 pieces over 10cm, some complete satellites. Small ship, more like.

The energy taken to lift them has been vast. Dropping the stuff, or dispatching it into the sun is like firing dozens of rockets from Florida, without a payload. Total waste.


to assume the size size of a small car its orbit will decay and it will fall to earth


Velocity and distance from the planet would remain unchanged - unless the car was French, and then anything might happen.