PDA

View Full Version : Lightning strikes!


KRUSTY 34
20th Apr 2013, 00:19
Some interesting goings on out of Sydney this morning.

No less than 3, yes 3, domestic Jet transports reported lightning strikes outbound in the south of the terminal area. They were just the one's that I heard!

My greatest concern however was that they all elected to continue! One VA aircraft however later advised that the company had directed them to divert.

I've had a few (lightning strikes) over the years, and I've always diverted to the nearest suitable aerodrome, regardless of whether the aircraft appeared to be performing normally or not. On one occasion there was a neat hole drilled through the Radome!

Maybe our procedures are different to theirs, but on the surface it seems to me to be risky behavior.

Opinions?

waren9
20th Apr 2013, 00:25
Maybe that Virgin jet was off to somewhere they didn't have engineering available? No point grounding a jet, pending maint action at an outstation if you don't have to.

GAFA
20th Apr 2013, 01:34
Krusty,

The domestic narrowbody jet I fly has a Lightning Strike procedure and checklist. The checklist contains a check of all systems and if or Ok the flight can proceed. Should there be an unsafe condition of any system then a diversion to the nearest suitable airport should be considered.

my oleo is extended
20th Apr 2013, 02:48
GAFA, agreed. Aircraft have lightning checklists. If you complete the systems checks and tick the boxes you are right to go basically.
However, aircraft type does come in to it. Although a Boeing driver, I have mates who fly the buses and they 'apparently' are more susceptible to strikes due to the electronic/computer hardware.
Any generalist avionics gingerbeers care to comment? I'm pretty interested in opinions and experience on this matter, maybe there is an unofficial list of which aircraft type are more prone to be damaged from strikes than another?
Although I admit that the strength of the discharge, location of strike etc can determine the outcome. I have seen a few static ports damaged over the years.

Oleo

waren9
20th Apr 2013, 04:50
Anyone remember the Saab in NZ get hit about 10 years ago? Blew the plastic rudder in half apparently.

Captain Dart
20th Apr 2013, 05:10
...no, but I wouldn't want to be in one of those 'more electric', Tupperware Boeing 787s in a thunderstorm (assuming they fix the battery problem, that is).

Jetstar is welcome to them.

Normasars
20th Apr 2013, 05:52
.....and you don't think a company with the expertise of Boeing didn't consider that in the design concept Dart?

Give me a break !!!

Captain Dart
20th Apr 2013, 06:20
Their expertise was't too good when it came to the batteries. How long has the latest Boeing been grounded now?

T-Vasis
20th Apr 2013, 06:25
Boeing did not design the batteries.

They design aeroplanes.

The batteries are a peripheral.

maggot
20th Apr 2013, 06:26
However, aircraft type does come in to it. Although a Boeing driver, I have mates who fly the buses and they 'apparently' are more susceptible to strikes due to the electronic/computer hardware.
Any generalist avionics gingerbeers care to comment? I'm pretty interested in opinions and experience on this matter, maybe there is an unofficial list of which aircraft type are more prone to be damaged from strikes than another?

Yeah. Nah.

The 738 is an absolute lightning magnet

KRUSTY 34
20th Apr 2013, 08:03
Appreciate the comments guys. I did mention that their procedures might differ from ours, and now I know!

I wonder if the checklist will tell the crew that there's a hole in the Radome? I guess it would become apparent when the incoming water does it's job.

Sometimes Wally, command decision making means thinking outside the checklist.

Incoming! :E

KRUSTY 34
20th Apr 2013, 08:45
I know Wal'

Bane of us all these days. :ok:

Octane
20th Apr 2013, 08:55
Would a crew of an airliner necessarily know they've been struck by lightning?

bloated goat
20th Apr 2013, 09:06
Some pilots may confuse lightning strikes when they are in fact just static discharges. Very common around the freezing level. They still pack a punch and leave holes in the aircraft and blinding at night but they're not necessarily associated with TS.

Captain Dart
20th Apr 2013, 09:16
Some 'peripheral' T-VASIS. It's grounded the aircraft for, I say again, how long? The battery ventilation, fire control, acceptance and reliance on these batteries are a Boeing issue.

But I'll throw you a bone and state that I'm not too happy when I am struck by lightning in my Airbus, either. So far no problems in 18 years, but there is always a first time...

waren9
20th Apr 2013, 10:30
Would a crew of an airliner necessarily know they've been struck by lightning?

No

10charactersreqd

SeldomFixit
20th Apr 2013, 10:32
radios all work ? check
Compass vaguely accurate ? check
Systems ops normal ? check
Onward my son, onward. :ok:

Ngineer
20th Apr 2013, 11:38
but I wouldn't want to be in one of those 'more electric', Tupperware Boeing 787s in a thunderstorm

Totally agree.

nitpicker330
21st Apr 2013, 02:18
Some here mention lightening strike checklists??

I've never seen one on the 777 or the A330 or the 737.....

Standard proceedure says
1/check the Nav display headings v the compass against several headings
2/ if no abnormal system events then continue as required
3/ write it up in the Maint log on arrival and raise an Air Safety Report.
4/ go home and change undies :ok:

GAFA
21st Apr 2013, 04:52
nitpicker330,

Have a look in the QRH of the narrowbody jets made south of the Equator and you will find procedures and checklists for dealing with lightning strikes.

nitpicker330
21st Apr 2013, 06:06
Ok, I fly Jets that fly through the ITCZ area everyday and all other areas of the world from the North Pole and everywhere south of it.

I've never seen a lightening checklist......:eek:

maggot
21st Apr 2013, 06:40
embraers


...

travelator
21st Apr 2013, 07:56
Must be no such thing then. :rolleyes:

GAFA
21st Apr 2013, 09:00
Yep, Embraer 170-195 Family, 4 pages in the Supplementary Normal Procedures section of the QRH, that's what you get for having an aircraft designed after 2000:ok:

Max Alt: 41000' and spend most of the time between F320- F390.

nitpicker330
21st Apr 2013, 09:56
Ahh that's what you meant by south of the Equator then...:ok:

GAFA
21st Apr 2013, 10:29
Sure was, thought I gave enough clues :ok:

The Golden Rivet
21st Apr 2013, 11:07
if you can get access to the Boeing 737 SRM and AMM, check out the requirements for inspections after a lightening strike for us gingers, not to mention the repairs that occur when you guys/gals have gone home after the entry in the log. : take a look on your next walk around and note the location of external skin patches or dome headed rivets on a smooth area of skin, a good majority aren't from hanger rash (hate that term) or aero bridges !

ampclamp
21st Apr 2013, 21:59
Guys please, it is lightning strike not lightening strike.:)

ALAEA Fed Sec
21st Apr 2013, 22:46
Having Engineering support or not should not come in to the equation of whether your flt is safe to continue. If you have a checklist and the bottom line is to continue then so be it.

*Lancer*
21st Apr 2013, 23:45
Steve, although it might be 'safe' to continue, it's not necessarily the best operational decision. Subsequently being grounded at an unmanned port, although completely safe, might suggest an alternative course of action...

compressor stall
22nd Apr 2013, 02:19
Airbus A32F AMM

After a lightning strike, before the aircraft continues in service, you must:
- do a general inspection of the total surface of the aircraft to find the strike areas,
- do a careful inspection of the strike areas to find the type and quantity of possible damage
- if you find damage, make a decision about the necessary repair/action.

The engineer requires a cherry picker/scaffold up to 11m high as well.

As it is a maintenance procedure, there is obviously a presumption in this chapter that this is all post flight.

nitpicker330
22nd Apr 2013, 07:03
Yep and that's why the Captain will make the decision ( in conjunction with Engineering ) whether to continue to destination or not. If the Aircraft will be stuck in Launceston ( for eg ) with no ability to sign off the lightning strike then you would be very silly to keep going.

In my outfit good Engineering support is available most places.