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Evanelpus
19th Apr 2013, 06:59
Just watching a news report of trouble ahead of this weekends GP.

Loonies throwing petrol bombs at police.:=. This is obviously not a spur of the moment action by the perps, they came well prepared, they even had spares!

Here's a radical thought. Why not allow police to shoot idiots like this? Pushing, shoving and chanting is one thing but throwing petrol bombs is well out of order and the scrotes who do this deserve everything that comes their way.

Tin hat on waiting for the many bleeding heart liberals to shoot me down.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 07:11
So you prefer a totalitarian non-democratic regime instead. At least we know where you stand.

Everyone should have the right of self determination based on equal rights and equality of opportunity.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 07:26
Didn't take long, did it?

Everyone should have the right of self determination based on equal rights and equality of opportunity.

Presumably you also support their rights to commit attempted murder, than?

What the Fug
19th Apr 2013, 07:38
MagnusP

The state or the Protesters

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 07:41
One persons murderer is another persons freedom fighter. All depends on your point of view. Guess you called the guys in the colonies in 1775 attempted murderers too, how about the French/Dutch/Belgian/Italian/Greek etc resistance in WWII, lemme guess, murderers too???? Any of the protesters during the Arab Spring? Ah of course, murderers too.

So you lot prefer autocratic regimes and any one protesting them or standing up against them are now attempted murderers.....

Capetonian
19th Apr 2013, 07:42
Everyone should have the right of self determination based on equal rights and equality of opportunity.

Of course. And if you served in the police and you had people throwing petrol bombs or rocks at you, you'd feel the same way? Do forgive me if I misjudge you.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 08:01
I mean those whose protest involves the use of potentially lethal force. What else would you call chucking a petrol bomb at people?

Evanelpus
19th Apr 2013, 08:02
Everyone should have the right of self determination based on equal rights and equality of opportunity.

Yes, everyone does have a right to self determination but, please, pray tell me wtf this has to do with throwing petrol bombs at law inforcement officers? I advocate shooting these scum bags, you applaud the way they go about getting their self determination?

Can't have it both ways.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 08:07
Yes, everyone does have a right to self determination but, please, pray tell
me wtf this has to do with throwing petrol bombs at law inforcement officers? I advocate shooting these scum bags, you applaud the way they go about getting their self determination?

Can't have it both ways.


Bahrain tortures its own people and has a dismal human rights record.

I do agree with you, the protesters should just shoot the scum bags instead of throwing rocks and petrol bombs.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 08:08
Why do I debate the issue of freedom with guys who live in a free democracy and are able to post on forums like this, but don't want the rest of the world to enjoy that same freedom.....

Bunch of hypocrites you lot.

Capetonian
19th Apr 2013, 08:10
Well done, cldrvr, you've just defined anarchy. No doubt views like yours are helpful in making those of the rest of us seem a little saner.

but don't want the rest of the world to enjoy that same freedom.....
Nobody has said any such thing. Does your idea of 'freedom' include the right to throw petrol bombs?

Evanelpus
19th Apr 2013, 08:20
Does your idea of 'freedom' include the right to throw petrol bombs?

he gives his location as Manchester.

Enough said!:ugh:

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 08:30
Does your idea of 'freedom' include the right to throw petrol bombs?


Bahrain is no different to Lybia, Syria, Egypt, Tunisia..

They have every right to revolt against a totalitarian regime. Were you also advocating to shoot the protesters in the rest of the Arab world? How about the anti apartheid movement? How about all the colonies standing up to their imperial masters? How about the revolutionaries in the US in 1775. How about the resistance during the Nazi occupation in Europe? Should they all have been shot too by the police/army?

Why is Bahrain any different? Just because they have oil? Why do Bahrainis in your eyes have less rights then the rest do?

Evanelpus
19th Apr 2013, 08:34
Were you also advocating to shoot the protesters in the rest of the Arab world?

YES

And not just in the Arab world. Anyone firing guns or throwing petrol bombs at police etc should expect a round or two of ammo coming back at them.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 08:35
Why do Bahrainis in your eyes have less rights then the rest do?

Right back at you. Why do Bahrainis in your eyes have the right to throw petrol bombs without consequences when I don't?

Evanelpus is right; you can't have it both ways.

green granite
19th Apr 2013, 08:43
They have every right to revolt against a totalitarian regime.

By whose authority cldrvr?

Oh and do answer a question when it's put to you instead of the usual waffle that you seem to use.

Andy_S
19th Apr 2013, 09:27
Bahrain is no different to Lybia, Syria, Egypt, Tunisia...They have every right to revolt against a totalitarian regime.

I hear what you’re saying, and the principle is sound, but the practical reality is somewhat different.

The protesters are most likely from the Shi’ite community, who have been at odds with Bahrain’s Sunni rulers for some while. And yes, they do get a raw deal, and have legitimate grievances. The problem is that the Shi’ites have close links with Iran, whose government are at the very least offering them moral support, if not actively encouraging insurrection. If they got their way, you’d simply be replacing one tyrannical regime with another one.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 09:32
And yes, they do get a raw deal


Raw deal? Their first 2 protests back in 2011 were peaceful, they were then forcibly removed by the authorities and several lost their lives. Bahrain invited SA in to help out and 4,000 of them were rounded up and tortured. The torture is admitted by the governments own report in the incident and had lots of recommendations, all ignored of course.

Guys here who will defend the actions of a totalitarian government so they can enjoy a car race for a few hours on a Sunday disgust me.

Let's not even start with the posters who say that all protesters in the Arab Spring uprising should all just be shot.

How easy it is for those that enjoy living under democratic conditions and untold freedoms to have rose tinted glasses when it comes to others around the world wishing for the same.

ExXB
19th Apr 2013, 09:32
OK you guys. Are you going to give back the tea you chucked into the harbour? Are you going to apologise for shooting at the red-coats? Are you going to agree to be ruled from Westminster? I didn't think so.

Transition to a democratic society is almost always violent. You don't get dictators to stand aside by asking them politely.

From Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahrain):

Human rights in Bahrain
The period between 1975 and 1999 known as the "State Security Law Era", saw wide range of human rights violations including arbitrary arrests, detention without trial, torture and forced exile. After the Emir Hamad Al Khalifa (now king) succeeded his father Isa Al Khalifa in 1999, he introduced wide reforms and human rights improved significantly. These moves were described by Amnesty International as representing a "historic period of human rights".

Human rights conditions started to decline by 2007 when torture began to be employed again. In 2011, Human Rights Watch described the country's human rights situation as "dismal".

In 2011, Bahrain was criticised for its crackdown on the Arab spring uprising. In September, a government appointed commission confirmed reports of grave human rights violations including systematic torture. The government promised to introduce reforms and avoid repeating the "painful events". However, reports by human rights organisations Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch issued in April 2012 said the same violations were still happening.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
19th Apr 2013, 09:40
It is hard to defend a regime that gives out sentences of 15 years imprisonment to doctors who treated wounded protestors after 2011's protests.


Bahraini court confirms jail terms for medics who aided protesters ? RT News (http://rt.com/news/bahrain-dortors-appeal-denied-382/)

cattletruck
19th Apr 2013, 09:45
Dunno Evanelpus, one my mates in Athens is a protest organiser. While the cameras were rolling there were rocks, Molotov cocktails, and batons flying left, right and center. When the cameras stopped rolling (so to speak) it was talk about family, friends and world events amongst other things between both sides.

Bruised and bloodied they put on a good show most nights, but don't ever accuse them of faking it, they really do stand by their convictions, but you don't have to kill or severely maim someone just to prove that point.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 09:46
Lock up the doctors, and torture them while you are at it, shoot the protesters, we can't have the peasants revolting now can we.

How dare they interrupt a car race, just because they want democracy. Sod them, let them live under tyranny.

KBPsen
19th Apr 2013, 09:47
It is hard to defend a regime that gives out sentences of 15 years imprisonment to doctors who treated wounded protestors after 2011's protests.Apparently if you don't then you are a bleeding heart liberal.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
19th Apr 2013, 09:54
Inadvisable to have a bleeding heart if the doctors are all locked up.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 09:54
Apparently if you don't then you are a bleeding heart liberal.


Evanelpus, Capetonian and Magnus would rather turn all these pesky little Middle Eastern countries into little North Koreas so they can enjoy their little car race on Sunday in a free democratic country with untold freedoms and rights.

Can't have the Arabs enjoy any of those rights of course, they are just there to supply them with oil.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 09:59
Nice try at obfuscation, cldrvr, but I don't particularly care about the race. What interests me is your apparent reluctance to explain why you defend the rights of some to attempt murder.

cuefaye
19th Apr 2013, 10:00
Whilst I don't condone some of his more extreme comments, I do agree with cdrvr's underying opinion. The regime's treatment of its medical profession defies belief, and rightly attracts scorn over its supposed intention to implement further reform. As for staging the Grand Prix, do those that oppose it also advocate the withdrawal of all ex-patriot activity on the island? Both are nugatory and unhelpful notions in my opinion.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 10:03
I agree. The regime is a disgrace. However, you want to go for armed insurrection? Fine, but watch out for the consequences. The UN estimates over 70,000 dead in Syria as at February 2013; the opposition groups estimate at least double that.

Be careful what you wish for.

Evanelpus
19th Apr 2013, 10:07
Let's not even start with the posters who say that all protesters in the Arab Spring uprising should all just be shot.

I have said that all protesters who use guns and petrol bombs against law enforcement officers should be shot, whether they are from Bahrain or Birmingham.

Evanelpus, Capetonian and Magnus would rather turn all these pesky little Middle Eastern countries into little North Koreas so they can enjoy their little car race on Sunday in a free democratic country with untold freedoms and rights.

I certainly am looking forward to a good F1 race at the weekend.

What interests me is your apparent reluctance to explain why you defend the rights of some to attempt murder.

I doubt you'll get a straight answer from him.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 10:09
I agree. The regime is a disgrace. However, you want to go for armed
insurrection?


They tried peaceful protest in Bahrain, they were met with violence by the regime dozens were killed and 4,000 of them were locked up and many of them tortured.

What is the alternative, you expect the population just to accept it? Peaceful protests got them nowhere.

Now the Grand Prix is in town, that is a great opportunity for the protesters to draw attention to their fight for democracy and human rights, the world's media is watching.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 10:11
So because Ecclestone's little circus is in town, you condone premeditated attempted murder? Says a lot about you.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 10:14
So because Ecclestone's little circus is in town, you condone premeditated
attempted murder?


It was the government who started killing its citizens to enforce its dictatorial rule.

Why should the rulers be allowed to shoot its population at will just because Ecclestone's little circus is in town.

Why defend this regime, or others around the Middle East for that matter?

Lon More
19th Apr 2013, 10:15
First they came for the communists,
and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a communist.

Then they came for the socialists,
and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a socialist.

Then they came for the trade unionists,
and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews,
and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a Jew.

Then they came for the Catholics,
and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a Catholic.

Then they came for me,
and there was no one left to speak for me.

MagnusP
19th Apr 2013, 10:15
I've seen no-one here defend the regime. Nor have I seen you condemn premediated murder attempts.

pvmw
19th Apr 2013, 10:17
Now the Grand Prix is in town, that is a great opportunity for the protesters to draw attention to their fight for democracy and human rights, the world's media is watching.
Presumably, you would therefore justify the placing of a couple of bombs at another sporting event recently held in Boston as part of a fight for something that the bombers apparently consider an equally just cause?

Defend one form of violence, and you'll find it hard to condemn the other - or is violent protest only acceptable when it is a cause that you believe in?

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 10:22
Nor have I seen you condemn premediated murder attempts.


And I won't, not in this case. Civilians who rise up for better living standards, a democracy and human rights are not murderers in my eyes.

cldrvr
19th Apr 2013, 10:23
Presumably, you would therefore justify the placing of a couple of bombs at
another sporting event recently held in Boston as part of a fight for something
that the bombers apparently consider an equally just cause?


Now you are being silly, how can you compare the 2.

Capetonian
19th Apr 2013, 10:26
cldrvr You're allowing your rightful prejudice against the Bahraini regime to cloud what others are saying.

I have no interest whatsoever in a procession of computer controlled cars going round a race track, let's get that straight.

I agree that the Bahraini regime curtails the civil rights of many of its citizens, as do many other regimes, and that has been the case through history and will not change.

I agree that protest and opposition are a necessary part of securing regime change and something closer to democracy.

I do not agree that protesters should be allowed to endanger the lives and property of other people, who may well be innocent bystanders. The police are only trying to uphold the law - they don't make it and may well disapprove. Protest has to be directed at those at the top.

Since you've, inevitably, dragged Apartheid into this, it's worth pointing out, as someone else did, that the result of a change may be simply substituting one form of totalitarianism for another, and in the case of South Africa, a worse one.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
19th Apr 2013, 10:30
Defend one form of violence, and you'll find it hard to condemn the other.

Armed Forces, police etc are justifiable if they defend justice. The Bahraini regime is not, by any western standards, just. The principle of proportionality is a part of justice. In a 'just war' argument, the principle of immediate threat also applies, but Lon More's little story points out that evil regimes can exploit the immediacy argument to achieve their ends.

We can probably all agree to the above. Our disagreement lies in whether the current level of injustice by the Bahraini regime justifies a level of protest which involves petrol bombing police.

The question we should all ask ourselves is: If my family had recently had a son tortured and murdered, and a doctor imprisoned, would I be out there with the petrol bombers?

In my case, no.

But only on the grounds of ineffectiveness. There are better ways to get rid of regimes.:E

green granite
19th Apr 2013, 10:32
cldrvr, When are you going to answer the question I asked you? Or are you like all left wingers only answer those that suit you?

G-CPTN
20th Apr 2013, 21:48
BBC News - Bahrain Crown Prince Salman addresses civil rights (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-22231040)

racedo
20th Apr 2013, 21:58
Crown Prince wants to preserve status quo and anybody tinkering with his familys believed right to do what ever they wish to preserve their wealth is a terrorist.

The claim that because someone wears a police uniform of a dictatorial state then they should be treated the same way as a PC on the beat in London or Boston is laughable.

On the very same basis attacking Gestapo who were legally part of law enforcement of Nazi regime has to be deemed to be wrong...............they wore the uniform and legally police so can't quibble now guys.

parabellum
20th Apr 2013, 23:03
Why is Bahrain any different? Just because they have oil?


I think it might help if those who are opposed to the regime in Bahrain had actually been there, lived there and to have done a bit of research about the place before posting here.

Bahrain has not had a marketable amount of oil since the 1930's. Iran claim Bahrain as part of Iran and have been the agent provocateur for at least sixty years , to my knowledge. Saudi Arabia are very concerned that Iran should get a foothold on their side of the Gulf and will protect Bahrain at all costs from becoming a Shi'ite sate, hence the causeway SA paid for and financial help that it provides to Bahrain. The protests are being orchestrated from Iran and have little or nothing to do with democracy.

sirwa69
21st Apr 2013, 04:50
Oh I can't be bothered reading all the nonsense posted here by people who have not got a clue what they are talking about. So I will say this only once!

I have lived in Bahrain for 20 years and my eyes have not been closed to whats going on:

1. Western style Democracy will not work here as their concept of one man one vote is that the local Mulla is the one man who tells everybody else how to vote. There would only be one free election and then ther would be an Iranian style theocracy.

2. The ethnic split is not 70% Shia and 30% Sunnis that was 10 years ago, it is now 50/50 thanks to massive immigration of Sunni's from Jordan, Syria, Pakistan etc.

3. If the powerful Al Khalifa's gave up the fight we would have a civil war such as Syria with Saudi Arabia and Iran fighting a proxy war.

4. Bahrain does have a freely elected parliament it just does not have much power at the moment. However each iteration of it gets a bit more power and as soon as the MP's are well eductated and not puppets of the mosque then they will have real power.

5. The Bahrain police are no more brutal than police in any other country and I include UK and USA in that statement, just look at the way police deal with large protests when they kick off. I am not saying that's bad just neccesarry. The Bahrain police are there to protect the rest of the public from the loonies and of course to protect themselves.

6. Civil Rights are available and respected in Bahrain everyone is entitled to them just not mobs.

7. Not all Doctors who treated rebels were prosecuted, just those who refused to treats any one else during that time. Remember this was the main government hospital, over 50% of the population of Bahrain are expats and most of them cannot afford private medical care. All public medical care in Bahrain is free and generally very good but you have to go to Salmaniaya hospital. During the disturbancies of February 2011 these doctors turned away and refused to treat any expats or Sunnis who tried to get to the hospital. Then they stole large quantities of medical supplies to go and setup private clinics. These doctors are of course all well educated and very good at getting their point across to western media.

Finally can I please ask only those who are qualified to comment on this topic. If you have not spent a significant time in Bahrain then you absolutely DO NOT know what you are talking about so please don't

Thank You.
Sirwa,
British and 21 years in Bahrain.

Victor Inox
21st Apr 2013, 07:54
Western style Democracy will not work here


Much like it was - and is - in South Africa. But Bernie Ecclestone is nevertheless obviously proud to point out that he was the one who pulled F1 out of that country. :ugh:

hellsbrink
21st Apr 2013, 08:22
Raw deal? Their first 2 protests back in 2011 were peaceful, they were then forcibly removed by the authorities and several lost their lives.

They were also ILLEGAL as the proper permits had not even been applied for, never mind granted, and only one life was lost (reports are fuzzy as to why that one man was shot) and not "several (people) lost their lives" in the first two days of protest on 04/02 and 14/02/2011.

Now, what happens in pretty much every other country when there are illegal protests of this nature? That's right, the order goes out to disperse or be dispersed. They didn't "disperse", in most cases although some did disperse peacefully, so the police went in to "disperse" them. That's normal behaviour, even in "free" countries like the UK.

You got a problem with the rule of law being upheld against those who have no respect for the rule of law, that's your problem and not mine.

B Fraser
21st Apr 2013, 08:58
Does Bahrain have any oil ????? I always thought so but maybe I'm wrong according a report published in 2007. If it is correct then much of the ranting on the latest right / left outrage bus seem to be the usual old bollox.

From Middle East Oil Reserves By Country and Rank - What Are the Middle East's Oil-Rich Countries (http://middleeast.about.com/od/oilenergy/a/me080207d.htm)

The terms "Middle East" and "oil-rich" are often taken together as synonyms of each other--as if every country in the Middle East were an oil-rich, oil-producing exporter. The reality is at odds with that assumption. The Greater Middle East adds up to more than 30 countries. Only a few of those have significant oil reserves and produce oil enough to slake their energy needs and export oil as well. Several have minor oil reserves. Below is a list of oil-dry countries, followed, below the break, by a table ranking the Middle East's oil-rich countries according to known oil reserves:

The Oil-Dry Nations of the Greater Middle East:




Afghanistan
Bahrain
Cyprus
Comoros
Djibouti
Eritrea
Israel
Jordan
Lebanon
Mauritania
Morocco
Somalia

The Mideast's Oil Produces, by Known Reserves

RankCountry Reserves
(billions of barrels) 1 Saudi Arabia 262.3 2 Iran 136.3 3 Iraq 115 4 Kuwait 101 5 United Arab Emirates 97.8 6 Libya 41.5 7 Kazakhstan 30 8 Qatar 15.2 9 Algeria 12.70 10 Azerbaijan 7 11 Oman 5.5 12 Sudan 5 13 Egypt 3.7 14 Yemen 3 15 Syria 2.5 16 Turkmenistan 0.6 17 Uzbekistan 0.6 18 Tunisia 0.4 19 Pakistan 0.3 Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Oil & Gas Journal; 2007 figures.
Note: The figures above represent the rankings of oil reserves only in the Middle East. For perspective, see the rankings of the world's top oil producers (http://middleeast.about.com/od/oilenergy/a/me090607d.htm).

cuefaye
21st Apr 2013, 10:35
I agree Basil - well put sirwa. I met a resident ex-pat just recently, and he expressed similar views. I lived there for three years in the seventies, and have tried to keep tabs on the country's progress; the Head of CID from 1990-2005 was/still is, a mate. Commenting from a distance, with little informed knowledge, is akin to those who rant on about the behaviour of football fans but have never ever set foot inside a stadium (no, I'm not a fan). I keep promising myself a nostalgic visit at some point before my expiry date!

parabellum
21st Apr 2013, 11:37
B Fraser - from my post #44.






Bahrain has not had a marketable amount of oil since the
1930's.


Excellent post sirwa69, I only spent eight (great) years there but you said it all. I was particularly annoyed by the British Foreign Office who said they, "did not think there was any Iranian involvement" in the previous disturbances, total bollox, it has always been fostered by Iran and as you say, it is only an Iranian style 'democracy' that would prevail if the Shi'ites won an election.

racedo
21st Apr 2013, 13:47
They were also ILLEGAL as the proper permits had not even been applied for,

Classic bureaucrats way of backing up the military in claiming permits not in place.

Gestapo I bet would have loved to use that one as well.

racedo
21st Apr 2013, 13:48
The ethnic split is not 70% Shia and 30% Sunnis that was 10 years ago, it is now 50/50 thanks to massive immigration of Sunni's from Jordan, Syria, Pakistan etc.

At which point then the current family have nothing to worry about so let them hold free and fair elections then.

hellsbrink
21st Apr 2013, 14:26
So only those wishing to overthrow Governments are right and everyone else is wrong, racedo?

Checkboard
21st Apr 2013, 14:42
I wonder if any of those posting against the likes of cldrvr and racedo support the USA's second amendment?

You know - the one which implies an endorsement of armed insurrection (presumably against government officials) in the pursuit of resistance to oppression?

hellsbrink
21st Apr 2013, 15:04
My views are known, checkboard, and I would want that introduced into certain other countries.....

racedo
21st Apr 2013, 15:56
So only those wishing to overthrow Governments are right and everyone else is wrong, racedo?

Nope but given that the people of Bahrain have never had a choice and once they decide to protest the lack of choice the next door neighbour jumps in with its military to make sure it doesn't happen then its easy to take a side.

If rulers of Bahrain feel there is no threat then let them put it to the democratic vote.

green granite
21st Apr 2013, 17:51
What is it about some peoples myopic vision about democracy?

We in the UK do not live in a true democracy, the only real difference between us and a dictatorship is that we get to elect our next dictator every 5 years. In fact the main difference is that in a dictatorship only a few people get to feather their nests, but over here we have about a thousand MPs and members of the House of Lords all feathering their nests with consultancies, seats on boards, fiddling their expenses etc.

In a true democracy the people should be consulted before any major legislation is passed, here public opinion is largely ignored unless it happens to be convenient for the current group of dictators.

hellsbrink
21st Apr 2013, 18:01
Nope but given that the people of Bahrain have never had a choice and once they decide to protest the lack of choice the next door neighbour jumps in with its military to make sure it doesn't happen then its easy to take a side.

If rulers of Bahrain feel there is no threat then let them put it to the democratic vote.

You mean the democratic votes that have been held in Bahrain since 2002?

vulcanised
21st Apr 2013, 19:44
Well said, GG ! :D

racedo
21st Apr 2013, 20:53
You mean the democratic votes that have been held in Bahrain since 2002?

Where the house that makes all the laws is hand picked by the monarch and controls all legislation.

That is not democracy rather a smokescreen claiming we have elections even worse than that practiced under the USSR.

parabellum
21st Apr 2013, 23:12
You know - the one which implies an endorsement of armed insurrection
(presumably against government officials) in the pursuit of resistance to
oppression?



Not a valid comparison Checkboard, The problems in Bahrain are the result of deliberate shit stirring by Iran, not an internal insurrection against oppression or a genuine bid for democracy. The big picture is for Iran to create such a degree of trouble in Bahrain they would see the need to intervene on behalf of their Shi'ite brothers and then hand the whole place over to the Shi'ite population with suitable 'guidance' and 'supervision' by the mullahs, some democracy! Fortunately I don't see it happening, but if it did then you would see oppression on a grand scale!

green granite
22nd Apr 2013, 08:02
racedo, since you brought up the Nazis, these vociferous violent demonstrators in Bahrain behave in exactly the same way as the Blackshirts of Mussolini and Hitler. They are a minority trying to impose their will on the majority, their idea of a democracy is something where the people go and vote for them and nobody else stands a chance of getting any power because the elections are rigged in their favour. It says a lot about the regime in Bahrain that these demonstrations are even tolerated at all.

Incidentally, since you seem to class these people as freedom fighters and give them your full backing you must also back the 2 Boston bombers, as they class themselves as freedom fighters for the cause of Islam.

Lord Bracken
22nd Apr 2013, 08:48
The real issue in Bahrain politics is actually the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia.

The Eastern Province is where all the oil is (Ghawar field).

The Eastern Province is where all of Saudi's Shia are.

Therefore, Saudi Arabia will not tolerate a Shia-dominated "democracy", however independent, 25 kilometres away from its own Shia who sit atop all of the country's oil.

Case closed.

cavortingcheetah
22nd Apr 2013, 11:42
Meanwhile, the large as life Bernie Ecclestone had this to say, presumably from Bahrain:

We don’t go anywhere to judge how a country is run,” he said. “I keep asking people, ‘What human rights?’ – I don’t know what they are,” he said. “The rights are that people who live in the country abide by the laws of the country, whatever they are.”

driftdown
22nd Apr 2013, 19:31
Well said sirwa69 :D

Mr and Mrs Driftdown
22years in Bahrain

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Apr 2013, 05:59
Meanwhile, the large as life Bernie Ecclestone had this to say, presumably from Bahrain:

We don’t go anywhere to judge how a country is run,” he said. “I keep asking people, ‘What human rights?’ – I don’t know what they are,” he said. “The rights are that people who live in the country abide by the laws of the country, whatever they are.”


Interesting that he didn't apply that to SA back in the day.

SMT Member
23rd Apr 2013, 08:58
Thought the grandstands looked more empty than usual, even for Bahrain, but was surprised to hear a report of less than 30.000 spectators attending the race on Sunday. Was that due to increased security, a reflection of the popularity of the sport in the country, GCC tourists failing to show up, or what?

I mean, 30K at a F1 event, that's got to be close to an all-time record low. Doesn't hurt anybody but the pockets of the hosts, and for those of us watching on the telly it was a brilliant race, with or without people in the stands.