PDA

View Full Version : Lifestyle changes


probes
9th Mar 2013, 07:44
seems at least the 'western' world chagnes similarly, in broad lines?


1. Toilets have had an upgrade."Do you have a flush toilet?" was asked in the first survey. Most had a toilet but a significant minority had to take their business outside - 10.3% had an outdoor toilet and 1.2% had none at all.
2.The head of a household was always a man. In 1971 the survey asked people to identify the "HOH" - Head of Household - and the "Housewife" - because at the time, the traditional "bread winner" was assumed to be male. The terminology did not change until 2000, when HOH was replaced by Household Reference Person.
3.How to talk about women. In 1971 the survey set aside some questions "to the housewife only". In the health section, a question asked: "Did anyone outside your household give you any extra help with the housework or shopping because you were ill?" from 1971 to 1974. Today the notion of a housewife would prompt angry complaints from working women.
4. Hot running water was not a foregone conclusion. The 1971 survey considered how many households had a bath in the property. A sign of the times is that showers were not considered.
5. Coloured was an acceptable racial term in 1971 and included in the survey. The term was last used in 1986.
6. Smoking when pregnant seems not to have been as important an issue 40 years ago. Figures on smoking were collected in 1974. But the question of women smoking while pregnant was not asked. Now it is deemed a serious health risk for the baby and the information is collected.
7. Co-habiting - unmarried couples living together - has become much more common. Questions on cohabitation weren't introduced to the survey until 1979.
8. Telephones are everywhere. But they weren't in 1971.
9. Washing machines too.
10. Some things don't change. Even in the internet age, the survey is still carried out face to face.

BBC News - General Lifestyle Survey: 10 changes from 40 years of questions (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21698533)
but the most surprising thing for me - "...a smaller proportion agreeing to be questioned.". People willingly share their lives, farce and twt; agree to be scanned and videomonitored... and do not want to be asked about their lifestyle? :p

arcniz
9th Mar 2013, 11:51
People willingly share their lives, farce and twt; agree to be scanned and videomonitored... and do not want to be asked about their lifestyle?

Refusers logically are Likely to be not the same people as them wot readily despoil what little privacy remains to private persons.