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con-pilot
4th Mar 2013, 23:01
Tis to Ireland we be a goin'.

My wife is red headed, green eyed Irish/Sicilian (and I'm a very brave man), who has decided that she wishes to go to Ireland this spring to 'visit' her family roots, so to speak. Around the mid to end of May to be precise.

She has never been to Ireland, just seen it from the cockpit of a Falcon 900 and Falcon 50 as we have passed over on our way to London.

At this time I am paying instead of a corporation or the government, we are going to do an eight day driving tour and mostly staying in Bed and Breakfasts*.

As of right now, our itinerary is:

Dublin

Kilkenny

Cork

Kerry

Doolin

Galway

Then back to Dublin, spend a couple of nights, then back home, hopefully with Mrs. C-P, as she has been threating to stay in Ireland. We'll be renting a car, so we can change the itinerary as we wish.

So, any recommendations, things we must see, Pubs that I really need to visit or anything else fun/interesting/vita to do?

Oh, the tour company is Exploring Ireland.

Thanks in advance.



* She would like to spend one night in a Castle, preferably haunted, she's into that sort of thing. Me, just a Pub within walking distance, very short walking distance.

gusting_45
4th Mar 2013, 23:24
Personally I would ditch Kerry, not that its not beautiful, but rather because it is horribly touristified in many places. At least skip Killarney, sorry Killarney.

I've just come back from a long weekend in Connemara during which there wasn't a single cloud in the sky for the entire 4 days. Stunning scenery, fantastic seafood, really nice people.

We stayed in the Abbeyglen Castle Hotel in Clifden which is not a real castle but a good facsimile. It was a fantastically quirky place with charmingly eccentric owner and staff. Singalongs in the bar until you're too pissed to stand or too tired to stay awake any longer.

Compulsory champagne in the evenings, some fantastic rooms with four poster beds and real fire places. Get room 25 if you can. If you have an aviation interest then visit the landing site of Alcock and Brown, the original Marconi radio station or what's left of it ( not a lot) but fascinating. Make sure you visit the landing site and not just the memorial site, they're not the same. Inishbofin is close by, the sky road and the 12 pins are spectacular climbing. A bit touristy but a fascinating story is kylemore abbey up the road a bit. Inverin and its airport is close by as well, you can take a trip out to the Aran islands on a BN Islander. 10 minutes of fun in anyone's book.

That's my tuppence worth. Wherever you end up going. Have a wonderful time

Good luck.
G_45

Fox3WheresMyBanana
4th Mar 2013, 23:28
If you like whiskey, Midleton Distillery, Co. Cork. Very enjoyable tour and HUGE samples - hand car keys to non-drinker.

Dublin - Trinity College library, Book of Kells

Mizen Head, Co. Kerry- closest point in Ireland to the USA. Very atmospheric (i.e. windswept!).

11Fan
4th Mar 2013, 23:39
I did a 10 day Father and Son trip to Ireland not too long ago with Fan Senior. Rental Car, bed and breakfast, went where the wind took us. Fortunately, we got up to Northern Ireland this trip. Last time we went were during the Troubles in 72 so being able to visit there this time was a treat. We're from County Donegal several generations back so it was like going home. Putting together a list of things to see and do for a workmate. I'll copy you on the e-mail to her.

M.Mouse
4th Mar 2013, 23:39
Can't recommend anywhere in particular but having visited parts North and South I found 99% of the people to be some of the most hospitable people I have ever met in my travels around the globe.

11Fan
4th Mar 2013, 23:43
Kissing the Blarney Stone in 72.

http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm107/APC11Fan/1972.jpg

Explains quite a bit actually.

Dushan
5th Mar 2013, 00:00
Tis to Ireland we be a goin'.

My wife is red headed, green eyed Irish/Sicilian (and I'm a very brave man), who has decided that she wishes to go to Ireland this spring to 'visit' her family roots, so to speak. Around the mid to end of May to be precise.


At this time I am paying instead of a corporation or the government, we are going to do an eight day driving tour and mostly staying in Bed and Breakfasts*.



C-P. How did we transition from "she decided" to "we are going"? I'd be saying, have a good trip dear, are you sure two weeks I enough, maybe a month is a better mount of time to experience the "feel of the land".

Mrs. D travelled through Europe last year and a year before and I had a great time.

con-pilot
5th Mar 2013, 03:25
I'd be saying, have a good trip dear

She needs some one to carry all of her luggage. :p

And now the trip has turned into ten days. About every time I ask her how the trip planning is going, she tells me we're staying another day. Shoot, we may never get back home at this rate. :p

Thanks for all the replies, we'll be locking in everything around the end of this week. We'll be leaving the US from ORD on either BA or Aer Lingus, whoever gives us the best price, to Dublin.

So please keep the ideas coming. :ok:

galaxy flyer
5th Mar 2013, 03:37
If you have any Hilton points, the Conrad is nice and perfect location. Temple Bar is touristy, but still worth it. Hardly a nicer place in Europe to visit. I wish my wife would do this for me--she barely leaves the street.

GF

West Coast
5th Mar 2013, 04:03
Visit Kylemore Abbey in Galway if you're in the area. I do reccomend the ring of Kerry, just do it from the back of a tour bus. Driving it was nerve racking, how I brought the mirrors back in tact on the rental is still a mystery. When I was a teen, I spent many of my summers in Ireland. The last two, riding my bike all around the country, fishing and camping at will with my cousins, some of the best times of my life.
With the missus in tow not sure how it would go over, but the fishing in Ireland is phenomenal. Not a golfer, but I have heard its a golfers delight as well.

It used to be I'd visit for the helluva it, then for marriages or births, now unfortunately it's to bury relatives.

Krystal n chips
5th Mar 2013, 05:15
"Driving it was nerve racking"

Ah, one little amendment to the above please.

" Driving is nerve wracking "

Based on several trips from Dublin to Shannon...:uhoh:

Great country / people but,erm, be warned Con....the roads are, well, lets just say they can be " testing".... as can be the local driving "concept".

You may find yourself stuttering on the keyboard when you return until your nerve system returns to normal, rather than survival mode...

Lon More
5th Mar 2013, 05:44
I don''t know what you´re used to, but most rental cars have manual gearboxes, coupled with the fact that you''ll be confronted with having to drive on the correct side of the road. :rolleyes: I´d advise paying for the collision waiver.

edited to add. it might help to put a mark on the windscreen, my ex used to paint a lipstick arrow pointing to the left, to remind us of which side of the road to stay - really helpful at roundabouts

sitigeltfel
5th Mar 2013, 06:07
I spent two years in N Ireland in the 70's.

Some of the locals were trying to kill me.

I took the hint, and have no intention of ever returning.

Lon More
5th Mar 2013, 06:31
Some of the locals were trying to kill me

Looks like some of them are still trying, murdering scum (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/video/2013/mar/04/derry-bombs-mass-murder-potential-video)

Loose rivets
5th Mar 2013, 06:35
Mate will take you around a stately home if you happen to be a tad north of Dublin. Not too many guides with your flying hours on two, three and four-holers, so you'd have plenty to chat about.

As it happens, it was same mate as in this oft-posted snippet. When I say it was true, it was probably worse than it sounds.


That reminds me of a post I did on a pre-Prune site. True it is.

Dublin. c 1998.

Mate's throttle cable snaps on his 3.5 Rover V8 thingie. We affix a string to the working parts under the hood/bonnet, and proceed, with me in the right back seat gauging the traffic.

So long have we been friends, that I pulled the string at the exact moment he wanted power, and pushed it when he wanted to slow down. (well, we are in Ireland. ) We're doin' well, until a Trabant came around the corner on the wrong side of the road. The driver had a blotchy red to mauve face and a tweed jacket that was obviously thorn-proof. I pushed the string, and my mate swerved.

Really, this is true.

We got to the garage and they fixed the cable.

On the return leg, the battered Trabant came around the same corner on the wrong side of the road. I said to my mate, 'Fin':mad:'ell, that was the same bloke.' Mate said, 'Ah, to be sure, he always drives on the wrong side of the road when he takes a corner.'




This implies you'll be okay whichever side of the road yer on :p

Capetonian
5th Mar 2013, 07:06
It is a great shame that there is a lunatic minority in NI who are determined to settle old scores and kill innocent people.

It is one of the most beautiful places I know and some of the friendliest kindest people I've ever met. Much as I enjoy Eire, in many ways I prefer the North.

TWT
5th Mar 2013, 07:09
I'll ask the question that was asked the last time that story appeared in JB.

'How do you push a bit of string ?"

Lon More
5th Mar 2013, 07:18
'How do you push a bit of string ?"
Having done this in other cars, you don't, you pull it against the pressure of the spring that closes the throttle (fails closed, not open)

TWT
5th Mar 2013, 07:19
Thanks for the explanation Lon !

UniFoxOs
5th Mar 2013, 08:06
If in the vicinity, and you or SWMBO are interested in history, I found THIS (http://www.kerrymuseum.ie/explore_6.html) quite interesting a few years ago - a bit "touristy", though.

I assume you have read, or will be reading The Ireland Whiskey Trail (http://www.irelandwhiskeytrail.com/home.php).

Kilbeggan was good a few years ago, but I suspect it's become a "tourist attraction" now with gift shop, tea room and the like. We were the only ones there when we went and could have stayed all afternoon tasting.

Cheers
UFO

What the Fug
5th Mar 2013, 08:24
Hire a car, find a back road get lost.

Best way to see and enjoy Ireland

stuckgear
5th Mar 2013, 08:34
word of advice con.. if you are going to spend time in counties Galway and Mayo take walking boots, you'll probably regret it if you dont..

Hire a car, find a back road get lost.



is good advice..

and as a tip..

Egg,
Bacon,
Sausage,
White Pudding,
Black Pudding,
Toast..

a fine way to prepare for a day exploring the emerald isle.

hope you two have a great time.

angels
5th Mar 2013, 08:52
Lon - (fails closed, not open)

Not on a bleeding Morris Minor it doesn't. I was driving up the Purley Way (by the old Croydon Aerdorome) 39 years ago when the accelerator pedal sort of flopped to the floor and off I went. Even my old Moggy screamed past a Merc as I tried to work out what had happened.

After i'd done the Merc I just turned the ignition key off and coasted to a halt by the public lavatories on the left. Very handy. :}

I was clueless as to what had happened but Dad sussed it immediately. The throttle return spring had bust and so the throttle was unable to return and just went to full.

I remember it as if it were yesterday!

Oh, and connie, Donegal is my favourite area of Ireland, and as others have said, do try and get to the north.

M.Mouse
5th Mar 2013, 09:30
Despite sitigeltfel's understandable reluctance to return and having slipped in Belfast many times during the troubles it was patently obvious that the majority of people were ordinary folks trying to get on with life despite the best efforts of the vicious and ruthless terrorists.

sitigeltfel
5th Mar 2013, 11:20
The Blarney Stone......hmmm!

Anyone who has studied the construction of castles will recognise the aperture as being similar to the slot where the castle inhabitants, in medieval times, would take their morning dump.

bluecode
5th Mar 2013, 12:19
I would back up Gusting 45s description of Connemara. Living as I do in Galway city, a regular Sunday drive is out to Connemara. It never ceases to be spectacular. Easily done in a relaxed day.

The difficulty is in recommending places. There are so many. So just some highlights.

In Galway you could take the cruise boat up Lough Corrib to Ashford Castle. But it's an easy drive too. If you like John Wayne or Maureen O'Hara, Cong is the place, the location of The Quiet Man. Touristy yes but no less nice.

If you like Castles there are plenty. From fortified house to the real deal. Leap Castle in County Offaly is reputedly the most haunted castle anywhere. Visits can be arranged, not sure about overnights. It's not a b&b.

If you like big houses, there are plenty. Someone accused Kerry of being touristy, indeed it is. When you get there you'll soon know why. The ring of Kerry has to be done. But beware of the local drivers, they treat the roads there as if they were five lane highways while you're desperately clinging to left side of the road, with sheer rock wiping out your passenger mirror and a sheer drop on the right side. That does apply to Galway too.

But it must be said, roads have improved considerably with motorway links over a large part of the country. But really you don't want to be driving on motorways. The original roads are still there and contrary to the cliche. They are pretty good, unless you head off down one of the side road. Then it get's really interesting.:eek:

Rent an automatic, just one less thing to worry about and don't be tempted to get something too big.

Muckross house in Killarney is worth a visit, you can see the room Queen Victoria slept in, if you like your Royals. I stayed in The Lake Hotel Killarney, once. If you like your olde worlde atmosphere, it has it in spades. I felt like I was on the set of some old Agatha Christie novel. It has it's own ruined castle in the grounds on the edge of the lake and the deer tend gallop through regulary. When I stood on the balcony that night. I realised something. I could not a see a single artificial light in the hills across the lake. Now they may have ruined it since but worth checking out.

Of course you have to visit the cliffs of Moher in Clare, touristed to death at this point but no less spectacular.

It seems to me that there is a potential opportunity for aerial scenic tours around some of these places. Seeing them from the air really brings out the best in them. Hopefully someone will set up one....................;)

Naturally you'll visit West Cork, the difficulty will be in getting your wife to leave. It draws a lot of people in who never go home.

One of your biggest problems will be that you have a tight enough timetable. It is almost inevitable that you will end up somewhere and won't want to leave.

Check out this The Gathering - The Gathering Ireland 2013 (http://www.thegatheringireland.com/) It's an official government initiative. This has been accused of being merely an attempt to fleece tourists of Irish ancestry. I agree a bit but nevertheless there is lots of interest to potential visitors.

Edit: Should mention Galway city since I live here. Formerly walled medieval town, oddly enough part of the wall is on view in the local shopping mall. Still have some medieval stuff but mostly the narrow medieval streets which are open to cars or more accurately blocked by cars. Some good restaurants and obviously pubs with plenty of 'diddley eye' music. It's quite a cosmopolitan, liberal town. Lots of people seem to settle here, including me. Probably best to visit as the final stop, just before the drive back down the motorway to Dublin.

That's all I can think of for now. Any more PM me.

MagnusP
5th Mar 2013, 14:08
bluecode may be able to recall the name/location of the Galway fish & chip shop (sit-in) where you can pop to the pub next door to refresh your pint of Guinness. Spent a couple of pleasant evenings there.

In Cork, I love the English Market (yes, honest). Great produce.

UniFoxOs
5th Mar 2013, 14:12
Always fancied a visit here - flying boat museum (http://www.flyingboatmuseum.com/) - next time I'm in Ireland.


UFO

Lon More
5th Mar 2013, 14:21
The throttle return spring had bust and so the throttle was unable to return
aah. Wise monkies ollow the RAC Blue Book and fit two independant return springs.

Watch out for the pot-holes by the way Con; not just in the roads. i remember being in a Cherokee that found a hole in Dublin's main runway. Almost ripped the gear out of the wing.

bluecode
5th Mar 2013, 16:06
bluecode may be able to recall the name/location of the Galway fish & chip shop (sit-in) where you can pop to the pub next door to refresh your pint of Guinness. Spent a couple of pleasant evenings there.

In Cork, I love the English Market (yes, honest). Great produceUndoubtedly that was McDonaghs: Home (http://www.mcdonaghs.net/) on Quay Street where all the pubs are. On warm summer weekend evenings, yes really, and during race week. The whole street becomes an al fresco drinking session, entirely devoid of the tensions you might expect in other towns.

Galway is strangely lacking in good old fashioned fish and chip shops. In Galway Supermacs Not to be confused with McDonaghs, takes up that slot, that's where everyone goes after getting totally sloshed to fill up on salty food. Some remarkable sights to be seen there of a night. I remember being caught up in a free wheeling brawl, involving some Irish lads, Spanish girls wielding deadly high heels, bouncers and police. I was drunk enough to find it amusing. I might add that's it's not typical of Galway which is a very safe town generally with not much in the way of poverty and drug problems to be found elsewhere.

Vercingetorix
5th Mar 2013, 16:21
Con
if you cross the border from the south recommenrd the city of Armagh and also the Giant's Causeway.
If you stay in the Rebublic recommend a trip to Donegal to check out "Bloody Foreland"

Bonnes Vacances :ok:

con-pilot
5th Mar 2013, 16:31
Thanks for all the replies. It is really becoming very helpful and I'm sure that we will be making changes in our itinerary based on the posts here.

As for driving on the 'wrong' side of the road in a manual transmission car, I've done it before on my visits to England. But while I've experienced driving on the left, it has been a while, I was younger and my left leg was a lot stronger. So I'll seriously consider switching to an automatic transmission car. If it will not cost too much extra. As for the size, we are renting a mid-sized car, I'm worried that anything smaller will not allow me to fit my 6 foot 5 inch height behind the wheel. :p

Thank all of you again and please keep the ideas coming.

:ok:

wings folded
5th Mar 2013, 17:03
you will have to compromise, con, but do bear in mind how narrow some of the roads can be, and how the Irish senses of daring in crossing you can be.

Your size v. car size

Good luck

IJM
5th Mar 2013, 18:31
I don't think this has been mentioned previously, but I enjoyed The Burren area, which I did on a day trip from Galway a few years back:

The Burren - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Burren)

Have a great trip!

SpringHeeledJack
5th Mar 2013, 19:28
What are the aims of the trip, pleasure obviously, but is it to see landscapes, ancient buildings, culture, food and drink, the craic and so on.....? All this in manageable bits or more weighted towards one or two of these ? More detail, more suggestions :)



SHJ

NWSRG
5th Mar 2013, 19:52
C-P,

Do venture north...you won't be disappointed.

The Mountains of Mourne, the Causeway Coast, the Fermanagh Lakes, and Titanic Belfast are all thriving and friendly. We have better (and cheaper) restaurants than Dublin, and a nicer (if smaller) city as well. And Londonderry is this years city of culture...lots of musicky and arty things on.

And we're actually very friendly...most people look forward to coming back! If you have 8 days on the island, it would be a shame not to come our way...

Oh, and if you like whisky and golf, bring your clubs to the north coast, and call in at Bushmills while you're at it!

con-pilot
5th Mar 2013, 20:03
is it to see landscapes, ancient buildings, culture, food and drink, the craic and so on.....?

All of the above, a true, nothing set in stone holiday. We're just going to have as much fun as we can.

To those that have mentioned golf, sad to say golf is off, I can no longer play golf due to my leg. :(

And my leg is making me reconsider the standard transmission in the hire car. May go automatic if the price increase is not too high.

angels
5th Mar 2013, 20:20
connie - it's a price worth paying. Skimp and what seem like m inor things and you're in trouble if they prove to be major.

Do not hire a Morris Minor with one throttle return spring....thanks for the advice Lon, albeit 39 years too late!

One of the places I truly love in Ireland is Downings - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Downings) where the boys from Derry and Strabane used to come up for air during the Troubles. It was neutral there. From there it is a short drive to the places in southern Ireland (best call it Eire, or the Free State as my ma-in-law does) that are further north than Northern Ireland.....

If you have a miserable time in Ireland, time to call it a day.

con-pilot
5th Mar 2013, 20:54
If you have a miserable time in Ireland, time to call it a day.

I've been told that if you have a miserable time in Ireland, you might as well go ahead and shoot yourself. :ok:

bluecode
5th Mar 2013, 22:33
Donegal is no doubt hard to miss. The people there have a look about them. Dark haired, pale skin plus their accent. Beguiling is the word. The women can be utterly beautiul. Your Sicilian/Irish wife would fit perfectly. Then there's the scenery!

As for Northern Ireland, yes it's ok. Some amazing places. OK I'm biased, too much history. I felt Derry/Londonderry was depressing. Escaping back across the border was a relief. But no doubt the North is just like the rest of the island. Some extraordinary places.

Other places, that come to mind. In Kerry my sister rented a house in a place called Caherdaniel. My wife and I stayed there. We arrrived at night. In the morning we got up and looked out the window. It was a beautiful sunny morning and view was incredible, somewhat comparable to the Greek islands. An azure sea dotted by beautiful islands. On the horizon you could see the Skelligs, precipitious islands once populated by monks. Difficult to get to but amazing.

Then there's Dingle in Kerry, a bit overrated but not the road to get there. Clinging to the cliff. It also has the famous Dolphin, Fungi. You can also see some of the locations of Ryan's Daugther. Nothing short of spectacular.

I have to admit I'm spoiled, much of this is in reach of a day trip for me. If not an easy weekend away.

I kind of live in a disneyesque theme park. As ever you never appreciate it much.

My wife, who has travelled the world but has only recently discovered her own country is frequently bowled away by what he finds only a couple of hours drive away or even closer.

UniFoxOs
6th Mar 2013, 07:42
We have better (and cheaper) restaurants than Dublin

True enough. However if you want to do the traditional "Irish" thing - try BOXTY (http://www.boxtyhouse.ie/)

The Guinness brewery tour is a rip-off, by the way.

UFO

Tankertrashnav
6th Mar 2013, 09:29
I have no recent experiences of Ireland but a Dublin born chum who lives near me in Cornwall tells me that when he makes his twice yearly trips home he is staggered at the price of everything, from booze to daily essentials (might be the same thing!), so be prepared to have your wallet lightened considerably. I would add please make a trip North (where you will need some £sterling to spend which will go further than your euros). It will definitely be worth the trip and you can't really say you've visited Ireland if you miss out that whole chunk of it on the other side of the border.

Have a great trip - I'm sure you'll love it.

mutt
6th Mar 2013, 09:30
C_P..... read the small print re. the airline fares, baggage and other hidden charges are a PITA.

Good chance that I will be there at the end of May, so the 1st gallon of Guinness is on me. :)

Plan the majority of your travels at a speed of 40 miles per hour and you wont go far wrong. It takes the same time to travel from Dublin - Limerick today with the super roads, motorways etc as it did in the 60's when my dad was driving an Morris Anglia (sp) :):)

Mutt

MagnusP
6th Mar 2013, 09:32
Thought the Anglia was a Ford, mutt. Inward-sloping rear screen?

B Fraser
6th Mar 2013, 10:37
Wise monkies follow the RAC Blue Book and fit two independant return springs.

To be sure, to be sure !

I'm spending a lot of time in Dublin at the moment and the prices are indeed a bit steep. Thankfully somebody else is paying. I would suggest heading out of town as quickly as possible after avoiding the waterfront area as it is a bit bland. All very expensive but instantly forgettable.

That said, does anyone have any tips on where to go in Dublin in the evening for entertainment ?

While in Eire, never refer to the UK as "the mainland". The Irish don't take to kindly to it, otherwise they're a good bunch. Choose your pubs carefully as some of them can be a bit rough and you may come unstuck. I was reading in the paper yesterday morning that some drug dealing scum was executed where he stood. Given your background, you wouldn't be too upset but Mrs Con could be a different matter.

Do go "up North" to "Norn Iron" as they call it. Belfast is a laugh and the best fiddle band I have seen in years play in the back of Robinsons bar at "Fibber Magee's" on a Tuesday night. Dalriadh (sp ?) are incredibly talented. If you disagree then send me your drinks bill. Robinson's is well worth the visit as it is opposite the Europa which is the most bombed hotel in the world. Strangely, the windows are intact proving that there must be a god somewhere and he likes a pint.

When touring the north, spot the streets and villages where there are flags flying from every lampost and the kerbstones are painted in particular colours. Aslong as you are sensible, you'll be just fine.

Do try and go to a rugby, Gaelic football or a shinty game. You will then understand why we make fun of American football where the teams pad up.

MagnusP
6th Mar 2013, 11:00
B Fraser, In Dublin, I always liked Slattery's in Capel Street. They'd have singing pullovers on the ground floor and a blues/rock band upstairs, although it had undergone a refurb last time I was in and wasn't quite so good. Might be worth a look, though.

Whelan's in Wexford Street often had good music on in a little concert venue at the back of the pub. Saw Adrian Legg in there about a gazillion years ago.

Lots of fine pubs in Baggot Street, some have folk sessions on.

UniFoxOs
6th Mar 2013, 11:51
staggered at the price of everything

especially the beer. Be sure to have at least one pint of Guinness, though, as drawing it is usually quite a performance. You will also find most pubs don't have beermats on the tables - you take them from the bar when you (eventually) get your pint. Don't be tempted to drink Caffrey's bitter - its [email protected]

If you want some decent music in the sticks, don't hesitate to ask a local. We went into some pub in a remote village that had a sign about music on tonight. When we got in we found that the "music" was teenage "dishwasher" stuff. We must have looked a bit disapointed as the barman immediately asked if we were looking for real music, and pointed us in the direction of a small (presumably rival) establishment a hundred yards down the road. It didn't even look like a pub outside (or inside) and the music was in what looked like the kitchen, but the beer was good and the music was superb.

The "Irish music" in the bigger bars is generally very pop stuff - forty shades of whiskey in the jar - good for a party but not that genuine.

UFO

On rural roads you will often see a "half-lane" marked off on one or both sides. Considerate drivers of slow vehicles (most of them) use these to let you pass. You naturally do the same when sightseeing and not in a hurry.

B Fraser
6th Mar 2013, 12:32
Thanks Magnus, that's my entertainment sorted out for next week. Also, the Schoolhouse Hotel looks promising, better than the bland plastic hotel that I found this week.

Where's the best place for prawns, a steak and a pint ?

MagnusP
6th Mar 2013, 13:21
Where's the best place for prawns, a steak and a pint ?

Ah, now there you have me. Pints aplenty have I consumed in that fair city, but solid fuel has tended to be late-night takeaway or an immense breakfast in Bewley's (or bland corporate dinners). The odd bowl of Irish stew has supplemented that, but I'm afraid that fine dining hasn't featured.

bluecode
6th Mar 2013, 15:28
Plan the majority of your travels at a speed of 40 miles per hour and you wont go far wrong. It takes the same time to travel from Dublin - Limerick today with the super roads, motorways etc as it did in the 60's when my dad was driving an Morris Anglia (sp) http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/smile.gifhttp://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/smile.gif

Mutt Must have been a pretty fast Anglia! I think it's more to do with the empty roads back then. Getting out of Dublin is the problem, I think. Once on the motorway it's plain sailing. Dublin to Galway, motorway end to end is just over two hours. I did it in one hour forty once. :O ahem. But of course once in either city you can get fully jammed up. Big change from when it could be a five hour endurance test! But of course all the old main roads still exist, now much quieter.


B Fraser, Where's the best place for prawns, a steak and a pint ? Out of touch with the scene back there. But Marco Pierre White opened a steakhouse in Dublin. You might assume the quality is good. A lot of the celebrity chefs have restaurants in town.

That said, does anyone have any tips on where to go in Dublin in the evening for entertainment ?
Depends on what you're looking for. Comedy clubs? Theatre? Vicar Street springs to mind as a popular venue. Check out entertainment.ie or totallydublin. Plenty of options there. Buy the Evening Herald for other listings.

stuckgear
6th Mar 2013, 16:11
or an immense breakfast in Bewley's

oh that is an attraction for sure... if in Dublin in the AM, a Bewley's Breakfast will set you up for the week.

wings folded
6th Mar 2013, 16:16
Thought the Anglia was a Ford, mutt. Inward-sloping rear screen?


Used to be when I was young and so were they.

Conpilot

From Galway you should not miss Connemara, t'would be a grave error.

mutt
7th Mar 2013, 02:24
Agh, I knew that i shouldn't have mentioned a car that he drove before i was born :):):)

Mutt

bluecode
7th Mar 2013, 12:06
From Galway you should not miss Connemara, t'would be a grave error. Indeed, a few miles out of Galway city and you soon know why.

teeteringhead
7th Mar 2013, 12:55
Oh, and connie, Donegal is my favourite area of Ireland, and as others have said, do try and get to the north.
....indeed. And Co Donegal, being the Northernmost County in the Island of Ireland - is in "The South!" (Well, it is Ireland!)

The Guinness brewery tour is a rip-off, by the way.
Agreed - but you do get a fine pint included (or two in my case as Milady Teeters does not drinkl) and the rooftop bar has terrific views of Dublin.

What the Fug
7th Mar 2013, 15:04
Indeed, a few miles out of Galway city and you soon know why.

The natives notice you is not local so start speaking Irish in case they lose the grant money

con-pilot
7th Mar 2013, 16:49
Thanks again everybody, we've decided to go ahead and change the car to one with an automatic transmission and are now trying to figure out how to include Northern Ireland into the trip. But, we've only so much time, even though the trip has increased from seven day to ten, the increase due to mainly from all of the responses we have received here.

We have also decided to purchase the collision waiver for the hire car as well. No sense taking chances.


Mutt

C_P..... read the small print re. the airline fares, baggage and other hidden charges are a PITA.

Good chance that I will be there at the end of May, so the 1st gallon of Guinness is on me.

As for the extra costs, I am checking into those, as I have not traveled to the UK, Ireland or Europe as an airline passenger since 1982, as I always worked my way over since, I am concerned about hidden charges. As of right now BA is offering the best all around package and will give us a baggage allowance both on the leg to Ireland and the flight from OKC to ORD on American, no baggage charge.

We leave, as it looks now, here on the 15th and return on the 26th spending the night of the 24 and 25 in Dublin. So if that fits into your schedule, we would love to get together for a few Guinnesses.



Thanks again everybody, my wife is taking notes on what everyone has posted here, one reason the trip is now ten days instead of the original seven. We'll be locking in the trip in a day or two, but can still make some changes without increasing the cost significantly.

So please keep the ideas coming and we hope to meet some, or all of you if that could be worked out, of while we are in Ireland.

Cheers! :ok:

bluecode
7th Mar 2013, 16:53
The natives notice you is not local so start speaking Irish in case they lose the grant money Luckily my six year year old is going to a school where they're taught entirely through Irish. He's picked more than a cupla focal. He can be my translator!:ok:

bluecode
7th Mar 2013, 16:56
Once you've locked in the trip no doubt places of interest on the itinerary can be suggested. Ireland is pretty small so a two hour radius takes in a lot of possible day trips. If you do end up in Donegal, one of of the most best options to cross into the North is via the Lough Foyle ferry service. A kind of a mini cruise.

con-pilot
8th Mar 2013, 03:00
Mrs. Con here......appreciated you comment about the pub. Darlin' I'm tougher than nails. I'm a First Responder Instructor, worked for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, and now work in a doctor's office where most of the patients belong in a cracker box. I'd survive! Can't wait to get to Ireland!

CityofFlight
8th Mar 2013, 03:13
I expect nothing less from from Con-Pilot's wife. Way to go, my fellow species!! :ok:

B Fraser
8th Mar 2013, 06:58
Good for you Mrs Con, I'll check out the Schoolhouse hotel and report back in a week's time.

Whenever you see a building resembling Fort Knox and The Alamo, that's a police station and it will have a big sign on it saying "Garda".

bluecode
8th Mar 2013, 10:00
And they all have the traditional blue lamp outside. But by the sounds of it there's no need to to warn Mrs CP about the rougher elements to be found in Dublin and Limerick.

SpringHeeledJack
8th Mar 2013, 11:55
Might one suggest 3 great points of historic interest within an hour north of Dublin ?

1) Hill of Tara - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_of_Tara)

2) Newgrange - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newgrange)

3) Monasterboice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monasterboice)

Mr Con you can do them all in a day/half a day on your way towards Northern Ireland and Donegal. :)



SHJ

mutt
8th Mar 2013, 14:59
I would suggest that you don't get the car while you are in Dublin, you won't need it as its a relatively small city with good public transport and expensive car parking.

You have talked about staying in B&B's, you should look at some of the hotel deals that are on offer as they are very competitive.

Can I ask why you want to go to Kilkenny? If it has to do with family roots then thats fine, but otherwise I would suggest leaving Dublin and going west to Kilbeggan Kilbeggan Distillery - Home (http://www.kilbeggandistillery.com) (Note: make sure Mrs C_P is on the car insurance:))

Then south west towards the Rock of Cashel and into Cork. This can be done in a day if you don't overdo the distillery :) In Cork you can visit the OLD MIDLETON DISTILLERY Midleton Visitor Attractions Cork Ireland Jameson Experience Midleton (http://www.cork-guide.ie/attractions/jhc.htm)

From Cork move into Kerry for some of the most majestic scenery imaginable. From there head towards Limerick, on the south side of the Shannon you will find the Foynes Flying Boat Museum Foynes Flying Boat Museum (http://www.flyingboatmuseum.com), from the go straight to Bunratty Castle Shannon Heritage (http://www.shannonheritage.com/Attractions/BunrattyCastleandFolkPark/) The medieval dinner is quite enjoyable, and make sure that you taste a drop of Poteen.

From there head to Ennis and turn left for the Cliffs of Moher Tourist Attraction in Ireland, Things to Do in Ireland - Cliffs of Moher (http://www.cliffsofmoher.ie) and continue through the Burren [/URL] then into Doolin followed by Galway City.

After Galway head west into Connemara http://www.connemara.ie/en/ [url=http://www.ashford.ie]Castle Hotel, 5 Star Hotels Ireland, 5 Star Hotels In Ireland, Irish 5 Star Hotels - Ashford Castle, Cong, Mayo, Ireland (http://www.burrennationalpark.ie)and north towards Sligo.

After Sligo its either north towards Donegal or or north east towards Enniskillen, Londonderry and Bushmills Irish Whiskey ? Since Way Back (http://www.bushmills.com) followed by the Giant Causeway Visitor information - National Trust (http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/giants-causeway/) Then Belfast followed by Dublin.

You might find this interesting :)http://www.irelandwhiskeytrail.com

The timetable is based on you, if you cant play golf due to your leg, then i doubt that you will do much walking in the Burren or Connemara, so the time spent there can be quite short.

There are a lot of places that i have left out, but there is only so much that you can do in 10 days.

Last reminder is that gas (petrol for us) is about 1.60 per LITRE, so choose your car accordingly :)

Cead mile failte agus Slainte

Mutt

con-pilot
8th Mar 2013, 16:50
I expect nothing less from from Con-Pilot's wife. Way to go, my fellow species!!

I told you that she is Irish/Sicilian and that I am a very brave man. :p



Mutt

The timetable is based on you, if you cant play golf due to your leg, then i doubt that you will do much walking in the Burren or Connemara, so the time spent there can be quite short.


That has been a worry for us as well, flat, mostly level surface I do just fine, but with uneven surfaces, such as cobblestone streets and walkways really tear up my left leg very quickly. So I'm sure that there will be times I'll go sit in a Pub and tell my wife to take a lot of pictures while she walks around. :p

As we get closer to going on the trip, we'll be able to set dates and times where we can meet with you and hopefully other Ppruners. :ok:

Tom the Tenor
8th Mar 2013, 18:19
If you come to Cork and if you should like we can go for a pint together 'n talk about aeroplanes, primary care and the health service in a general way.

wings folded
8th Mar 2013, 18:25
con pilot,

for reasons which are not quite identical to yours, but similar, I am totally useless at self propulsion on gradients, but manage relatively OK on the flat.

If, like me, you can cope with uphill, but at your pace, then worry not, for Ireland is the country which has respect for your own pace .

They may well find you a bit too vigorous!

I am sure you will have a great time there; lovely welcoming warm people.

Oh, by the way, consider going to The Arran isles from Galway. You can get there by boat, but for aviators it is a lot more fun to get the plane from Connemara airport. The trip is 10 nm and they could not care less if you have toothpaste, shower gel or what else in your kit; their major interest is what you weigh for them to arrange the optimal balance for the C of G. of the plane.

It is reputedly amongst the shortest scheduled air routes in the world; I have no idea if that is so, but the view is terrific, and watching the sole pilot cycling the prop pitch each way (and mag checks) filled me with nostalgia from my flying days.

A further by the way, back on the egg topic we have discussed before, the Irish KNOW eggs. Enough said.

11Fan
8th Mar 2013, 19:12
Con,

The walk up to the Cliffs of Moher may be a bit of a challenge but 11Fan Senior made it fine and he was 82 at the time. I'm sure they have finished the new Visitors Center by now too. When we went it was still under construction so it was a bit of a hike from the parking lot.

This looks like a new picture from Google.

http://cdn1.vtourist.com/4/4692437-Visit_the_Cliffs_of_Moher_Visitor_Centre_Galway.jpg

G-CPTN
8th Mar 2013, 20:02
the shortest scheduled flight in the world, a leg of Loganair's inter-island service, to Westray Airport.
The distance is 2.8 km (1.7 mi), the scheduled flight time, including taxiing, is two minutes.

bluecode
8th Mar 2013, 20:18
Oh, by the way, consider go to the Aran isles from Galway. You can get there by boat, but for aviators it is a lot more fun to get the plane from Connemara airport. Good idea but and no promises it's just possible there might be an alternative. I have access to a nice eight seater. It just depends on the boss, who has this remarkably capitalist attitude that it should be out there earning money. But I'm due a hop to the islands, call it my bonus. Failing that maybe a bit of recurrency might be needed. Wouldn't want to get all rusty now would I?

mutt
8th Mar 2013, 23:12
The walk up to the Cliffs of Moher Not exactly, those steps take you to a viewing area and not the actual cliffs themselves, its not a necessity to walk up there to see the cliffs.

Mutt

11Fan
8th Mar 2013, 23:22
.....it's not a necessity to walk up there to see the cliffs.

And of course you're correct mutt. I was thinking along the lines of getting all the way out to the edge. By the way, your other post full of recommendations was great. :ok:

Passed it on -as well as some of the others- to a friend who is planning on going over this Summer as well.

Cheers,

con-pilot
9th Mar 2013, 02:01
Mrs. Con here again......We're looking forward to meeting everyone! Pints are always in order!

Solid Rust Twotter
9th Mar 2013, 05:00
I suppose a detour to SA is out of the question, Nkosizana Con...?:}

baggersup
9th Mar 2013, 07:04
Here is a huge money saving tip for your rental car, if you have not already discovered this (for the Republic of Ireland anyway).

I was unaware until I arranged to rent a car there in summer 2011 for a 3week drive around RoI that at that time Ireland was not a country recognized by American Express or some other credit cards that offer liability waiver options.

Unless that's changed since............

I was told before leaving the U.S. (and my friend was correct) that one of the only credit cards you can use in Ireland to waive that very very expensive liability insurance charge is the World MasterCard. I got one before going and that saved me about $450.

Had I rocked up at the car hire counter in Dublin waving my American Express plat card, they'd have said sorry no deal. They'd have said they don't honor it for a car hire to waive the daily liability charge.

As for touring Dublin the traffic was so horrific when I was there I'd not have bothered with a car.

IMHO the best deal to see Dublin is to get on one of the red bus tour things they have in various cities and buy a ticket that's good for 24 hours. Get it in the afternoon, ride the whole city circuit to all the sites, listen to the recording. Decide what you'd like to stop at and do that--or just ride to all the places to see what's on the route.

Then the next morning for at least half a day your ticket is still good for a second day of going to any site you wanted to go to that you didn't get to the day before.

And it's a get on and off kind of thing like the others in cities that have them. I found things like the Kilmainham Gaol where they executed the Easter Rising folks especially moving.

The tour is pretty complete for all the Dublin sites. The tickets are pretty reasonable---I think it was 10 euros or summat.

And don't know how much history you like to chase, but driving up to the top of the hill on the road where Michael Collins was assassinated is very moving, as well. There is a lovely memorial there to him and folks seem to leave momentos at it. Once you are up there you can see what a turkey shoot it was for his killers.

And also on the Michael Collins trail, a visit (if you can find it good luck!) to his boyhood home that was burned by the English soldiers where his mom brought up the kids is also a good side trip if you are into Michael Collins history.

His family finally got the site commemorated and there is a nice plaque there, but all that remains of the burned home is the stone outline. It's nestled away in a quiet backroad of farms. Very quiet and very thought provoking.

I also spent 4 weeks in Belfast after that at Queen's University and am so glad--with all their troubled history the folks are the kindest friendliest folks I've ever encountered traveling. And things like the Giant's Causeway are worth a visit in N.I. as well.

The city walls of Belfast are filled with all those elaborate partisan murals are a sight to behold. And you won't be confused at any time about whether you are in a republican or loyalist neighborhood!

Derry is also worth a visit for the ancient wall and you can see the sight of the "Bloody Sunday" event that took place years ago when some marchers were shot and killed on a grassy area. They have a little museum at the site of the shootings run by family members of those who were killed.

I was very glad I went to both the RoI and N.I. to round out the Irish history view.

Through our program at the college we met with ex prisoners, some of which were in the blanket protests and all were freed in the Good Friday agreement. It was a really fascinating learning experience.

wings folded
9th Mar 2013, 15:26
if you do not make an even token presence, con, you will slip off page one and be lost forever

con-pilot
9th Mar 2013, 16:37
if you do not make an even token presence, con, you will slip off page one and be lost forever

The response here has been so overwhelming, it is hard to take it all in. I cannot thank everybody who have posted enough, but I'll keep trying to thank one and all. Great work from all. :ok:

We are printing out the entire thread and have already made changes to the trip based on the extremely useful information that we have already received. Much to the dismay of the tour organizer I should imagine. :p

I've decided to turn in the hire car when we get back to Dublin on the 24th. As so many people here have advised us that keeping it to drive around in Dublin would be more of a wasted effort than a productive one.

We have changed from staying at B&Bs that are outside of the towns and cities to hotels in the center of the towns and cities, again mostly due to information received here and my limited, two night stay when I was in Ireland back before I retired. We stayed at a golf resort, which was very nice, but was way out of town and was rather boring in the evening.

So keep it coming and we are looking forward meeting as many of you as is possible with great expectations.

Here is the latest itinerary, subject to change I'm sure and I have paid the deposit for the trip, so now we have to go. Should be locking in the Airline tickets this weekend, with either BA or Aer Lingus.

16/05 Dublin

17/05 Cork

18-19/05 Kerry

20/05 Clare

21-22/05 Galway City

23/05 Mayo

24-25/05 Dublin

26/05 Return home.

Even though I've paid the deposit, we can still make changes for a small fee.

Mrs. C-P relatives came from county Wicklow, county Louth and county Clare. So somehow we need to figure a way to visit these places.

As time allows I'll be thanking every one for the extremely useful help and information that has been most appreciatively provided.

Cheers all. :ok:

wings folded
9th Mar 2013, 18:45
just curious, con , why is the Galway sector called "Galway city", but the other bits aren't?

Is there a meaning?

PS can't imagine why you have not leapt at bluecode's offer.

I would have taken it up pronto, and suggested that he should select the rezzie we would eat in after the little escapade, my part of the bargain being to proffer my rectangle of plastic in settlement of the financial damage.

con-pilot
9th Mar 2013, 19:09
just curious, con , why is the Galway sector called "Galway city", but the other bits aren't?


I've not a clue, as what I posted, was directly from the Ireland based travel agency.

for reasons which are not quite identical to yours, but similar, I am totally useless at self propulsion on gradients, but manage relatively OK on the flat.

If, like me, you can cope with uphill, but at your pace, then worry not, for Ireland is the country which has respect for your own pace

Yes, pretty much the same, however, for some reason, I can handle going uphill much better than going down hill. Why I've not the slightest.

As for the fantastic offer of bluecode's, I was trying to formulate replies in the order that they were posted, however as there have been so many, I'll just do the best I can.

With that being said, err posted,,,,

bluecode

Good idea but and no promises it's just possible there might be an alternative. I have access to a nice eight seater. It just depends on the boss, who has this remarkably capitalist attitude that it should be out there earning money. But I'm due a hop to the islands, call it my bonus. Failing that maybe a bit of recurrency might be needed. Wouldn't want to get all rusty now would I?

When my wife read your fantastic offer, she actually jumped up in excitement. So if this does work out, it will be wonderful. We'll figure out some way to change our schedule to accommodate yours if you can arrange this.

Needless to say, the beers after will be on us. :ok:

Probably even dinner, if we get around to eating dinner. :p

wings folded
9th Mar 2013, 19:26
Yes, pretty much the same, however, for some reason, I can handle going uphill much better than going down hill. Why I've not the slightest.




It depends, my dear con, on the nature of the snag that nature has chosen to burden us with. I gather that your snag is polio. Caught at some stage in your life, I suppose.

My little snag was there at birth, so not really "caught" but who really cares about the difference?

The main thing is, enjoy Ireland and the lovely people you will meet there, and please do give us some feedback on your experiencies, friendships you make and so forth.

con-pilot
9th Mar 2013, 19:32
It depends, my dear con, on the nature of the snag that nature has chosen to burden us with. I gather that your snag is polio. Caught at some stage in your life, I suppose.



Yeah, when I was three years old when we were living in Florida.

I, or I should say we, will be posting here all through the trip, including photos. So no fears on this. :ok:

wings folded
9th Mar 2013, 19:43
yes, but you had a full career, I think, notwithstanding, as did I.

One can, as we both know.

con-pilot
9th Mar 2013, 21:13
yes, but you had a full career, I think, notwithstanding, as did I.



Yes I certainly did, 42 years and 21,000 hours worth, I was one of the lucky ones. I've never forgotten that. :ok:

bluecode
9th Mar 2013, 23:55
Like I said, no promises. All the usual aviation caveats apply, weather, maintenance, availability etc, they are working aircraft after all, no need to explain further. But given your timetable it should be doable. We have long evenings this far west. It'll be bright until 10pm. So timing is not critical.

As for the Galway city thing, maybe they think you won't venture out of town.

con-pilot
12th Mar 2013, 17:15
No worries bluecode, if it works out, great, if not hopefully we can still get together for a few beers. Looking forward to meeting you if we can arrange that. :ok:




Okay, just made the final payment on the package. So we're going or I'll lose a bunch of money. Only one hiccup, the BA flight we thought we were taking from ORD, is now an American Airlines flight. Started out as BA, but for some reason it is now American. We have to keep it, as it is the only flight to Dublin that works for us, in regard to timing, cost and having only one stop at ORD from OKC to EIDW (DUB).

We'll be returning home on BA with a couple of stops.



This airline flying on my own money is quite confusing. :\


I'll admit it, I'm spoiled from flying corporate aircraft back and forth. I always knew where I would be sitting. :{

visibility3miles
13th Mar 2013, 16:24
This airline flying on my own money is quite confusing.
Would you feel more at home if they cuffed you and Mrs. Con-pilot?
;)

mutt
9th May 2013, 22:14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40fjyx40ft8

Just to get you in the mood....

mutt

Pinky the pilot
14th May 2013, 06:04
Have a Bushmills (or two) for me con-pilot!:ok:

El Grifo
14th May 2013, 18:47
Have a stonker Con !!!

You know my thoughts "Travel broadens the mind" :ok:

TBirdFrank
14th May 2013, 23:38
Con and Mrs C - I've only just seen this thread and you are probably packing now - but you can always spend a few hours of your days "in Dublin" catching The Enterprise from Connolly to Belfast and back.

Its a lovely coastal and mountain ride between the two capital cities with a restaurant car in first class, so you can get a taste of the north in your last couple of days - so you will!

con-pilot
15th May 2013, 01:24
Thank you TBird. :ok:

And you are correct, we are packing, then off to Ireland in the morning, our morning. Scheduled to arrive in Dublin at 08:00 Thursday the 16th.

Then off the next day to see the rest of Ireland, well at least as much as we can in ten days.

con-pilot
16th May 2013, 11:32
We made it, in Dublin at the hotel.

I must say right now that I love 'Merican Airlines, they upgraded us to Business class from Chicago to Dublin, may have saved my life. :p

So I take back all those rude and nasty names I used call American Airlines back when I was flying and had slow down for them or hold for them, not be able to cruise at the FL I wanted, etc.

Take it all back I do.

Now I have figure out how to get BA to do the same thing going home. :uhoh:

It will be worth a few beers for anyone that can help,,,,,,, okay, a lot of beers. :E

bluecode
16th May 2013, 11:54
Welcome to the weather, sorry Ireland. I know you might think this is exactly what you might expect here in the 'summer'. But it isn't really. The rain is usually warmer at this time of the year. I'm not joking. The current cold spell is unique.

angels
16th May 2013, 12:09
Ho ho! Enjoy the craic, connie and wife!!

Don't worry about the weather!

All the very best to you both and safe travelling. :ok:

MagnusP
16th May 2013, 14:58
Have a great time, c-p. If you find yourself near McDaids (Harry St, off Grafton St), raise a glass of the dark stuff for me. :ok:

con-pilot
19th May 2013, 18:46
A quick update, we are currently in Killarney for the night.

Mutt, I swear to God I just drove on that road you posted on that video. We accidentally ended up on Vallentia Island, so we drove all over it. We were on The Ring of Kerry and I took a wrong turn and ended up at ferry point for island. Figured what the hell and took it over to the island, fabulous place, but oh my God, the roads.

Only by the grace of God do we still have both side mirrors on the car and as far as I can tell, the body and the paint on the car is undamaged. It is miracle. When we finally stopped after we got off the island, my wife had to pry my hands off the steering wheel.

We have had a great time so far, everybody is very, very friendly and some have gone out of their way to be of any assistance. Last night our taxi driver refused to be paid, because it was raining and cold out. My wife finally made him take some money, "Just for the petrol.

It will be very hard to leave. We will be back and we still have a week to go in Ireland, just love it.

bluecode
19th May 2013, 22:38
You'll be battle hardened then by the time you get onto the roads of Clare and Connemara. You will wistfully look back on the wide open freeways of Kerry!

On the way towards Galway from Clare there are two scenic routes, inland and by the coastal road. Neither are for the faint hearted. The coast road would be my preference and recommendation.

parabellum
20th May 2013, 05:17
Must be losing my sight as I've only just spotted this thread. Con-Pilot, possibly too late but did anyone tell you to book and pay your car hire while still in the USA? Not sure what VAT/GST/Sales Tax they apply in Ireland but by booking and paying in the USA you should be tax free. If you paid in Ireland you may be able to get a refund at the airport when you leave.

B Fraser
20th May 2013, 07:26
I'm glad you are having a great time Con, I'm sure the taxi drivers are paid by the tourist board as they can be the greatest ambassadors for their country. I'm sure there are a few dodgy ones too who will try to rip off a tourist so keep your wits about you. As for getting the tax back, that assumes that the taxi drivers are filing their accounts etc. etc. so don't hold your breath.

The most famous pub in Belfast is Robinsons opposite the most bombed hotel in Belfast, The Europa. I recommend having a pint there and then trying out Fibber Magee's which is a music pub in the back of Robinsons.

Enjoy the tour and enjoy the people. If you only get to watch a gaelic football, shinty or hurling match on TV, check it out. You will soon see why we find the wearing of body armour for American football a bit strange. ;)

BruisedCrab
20th May 2013, 08:12
The most famous pub in Dublin is Robinsons opposite the most bombed hotel in Dublin, The Europa.

Pretty sure that Robinsons and The Europa are in Belfast. Correct island though!

B Fraser
20th May 2013, 08:57
They are indeed, my error.

:O

angels
21st May 2013, 07:25
Connie - hoping that all is well with your family and friends back home.

mutt
21st May 2013, 07:36
Mutt, I swear to God I just drove on that road you posted on that video. Nope, you are on the "training roads"..... the real fun begins when you go to Connemara :):)

Mutt

Loose rivets
21st May 2013, 08:40
con - I didn't know whether to worry you with it, but the wx is horrible back home. Are you getting news? And if you need me to call anyone let me know if phoning is difficult from there.


R

BenThere
23rd Mar 2014, 21:26
As luck would have it, I'm doing a 10 day trip with the wife to Ireland.

4 days Dublin, 3 Galway, 3 Killarney from April 22-May 1. Would be interested in sharing a casual Guinness with anyone around who doesn't want to throw a punch.

Capetonian
24th Mar 2014, 07:25
I will be in Dublin for a few days at the end of April (assuming that my new Nigerian friend doesn't have other plans for me!) and would be happy to share a Guinness or three with you.

BenThere
25th Mar 2014, 01:32
See PMs Capetonian. Nights of April 23, 29, 30 in Dublin. Citywest Hotel.

Boudreaux Bob
25th Mar 2014, 01:37
The only "Hurling" contest Con will see in Ireland will be on the sidewalk outside the Pub when some Paddy yells for Earl to bring the Buick.:E

BenThere
25th Mar 2014, 01:51
Greetings, Boudreaux Bob.

Just yesterday I came across the old Jerry Reed performance of 'Amos Moses' on Youtube. Thought of you. 'About 45 minutes Southeast of Thibedoux, Louisiana". Now the VOR is just called TIBBY, not Thibedoux. I always thought Jerry was singing 'Tippy-toe'.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfxVgIJ0XaY