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notmyC150v2
4th Mar 2013, 05:20
There seems to be some sort of general consensus that whale meat is bad.

I used to think so as well but lately I have started to wonder why I held that view. I am not squeamish about eating Poultry, Beef, Lamb (PBL) or any other form of protein that bleeds when wounded so why did I hold such strong feelings about Whales?

I understand the argument that they suffer unduly when harpooned and therefore the killing process is cruel and should not be allowed. But is that the only reason we have for not wanting to eat them. If they developed a method of "humane" death as we have for PBL would we be more accepting of whale meat in the deli's and supermarkets? I really don't think we would.

Is the argument down to the fact that they are large, "cute", apparently intelligent beings and therefore deserve better treatment than ending their existence at the end of a fork? If that is the case should we revisit the use of poultry (not as dumb as previously thought), Kangaroos (cute as a button), dogs (cute and smart and eaten in many societies that we don't condemn) and other protein?

So I guess what I am trying to ascertain is, if they developed a humane method of dealing death upon whales, would you support a commercial hunting operation by purchasing whale meat for your consumption?

My answer is that yes, I more than likely would.

Mac the Knife
4th Mar 2013, 05:32
If the population wasn't threatened (which it is), why not?

Mac

(Dogs, cats rats, humans...depend how hungry I was.)

:cool:

500N
4th Mar 2013, 05:36
I'd probably try it once to see what it was like,
if I liked it and price was OK, would probably
add it to the menu but as per Mac, if the
population was OK and sustainable.

probes
4th Mar 2013, 05:37
... a humane method...
take a look at PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) videos. Or don't, if you want to sleep tonight. Some were used in presentations by the vet students a couple of years ago, and...
Also the slaughterhouses. Do you really think these are any more human than harpooning? Or the life of chicken in chicken farms?

People are hypocritical.


And yes, I love pork and chiken (and see no reason why traditional whale-hunting cultures shouldn't feed on them).
As long as I don't see how it gets on my plate.

Ancient Mariner
4th Mar 2013, 05:39
I do it all the time and the population of the species hunted here is not threatened.
Per

owen meaney
4th Mar 2013, 05:40
No wouldn't eat whale meat, it taste too much like dolphin meat to me:eek:

cavortingcheetah
4th Mar 2013, 05:42
Muctuc is, to my taste, disgusting. It's worse than Polar Bear liver, which you have to be careful about eating in any quantity because of the high vitamin D content as a consequence of said bear feeding on seals.
Don't you think that so much of the human love for whales is traceable to a Freudian concept which can best be described, although perhaps a little bluntly, as fat people by association adore whales. They also relish penguins both chocolate and flippered and large gold papered Easter bunnies especially when made by Lindt?
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS-dUccFUxmCoc8NDZ18wJQCk-FcllvkKn6jwRX9C3yRIadJwgx

Flying Binghi
4th Mar 2013, 05:44
.


Australia's Climate Commissioner does have an occasional sensible thought...


ENVIRONMENTALIST and 2007 Australian of the Year Tim Flannery has declared his support for the hugely unpopular Japanese whaling program.
As Australia prepares to monitor the whaling fleet in Antarctica amid rising diplomatic tensions with Japan, Professor Flannery says there is nothing unsustainable about its annual cull of up to 1000 whales - particularly the common minke whale.

"In terms of sustainability, you can't be sure that the Japanese whaling is entirely unsustainable," Professor Flannery told The Daily Telegraph. "It's hard to imagine that the whaling would lead to a new decline in population."


Flannery says whaling is OK | thetelegraph.com.au (http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/flannery-says-whaling-is-ok/story-e6freuy9-1111115216998)




.

sitigeltfel
4th Mar 2013, 05:46
take a look at PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals)

I prefer the alternative, People Eat Tasty Animals.;)

Lukeafb1
4th Mar 2013, 06:36
I've eaten whale meat once. It tasted sour and I didn't go back for seconds, even though it was being served by a Swedish royal. :yuk:

Ancient Mariner
4th Mar 2013, 06:50
If the whale meat tasted sour it was. Never trust a Swede with food, or otherwise.
Per

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 06:53
"I turned around and saw him about one hundred rods (550 yards) directly ahead of us, coming down with twice his ordinary speed (around 24 knots or 44kph), and it appeared with tenfold fury and vengeance in his aspect. The surf flew in all directions about him with the continual violent thrashing of his tail. His head about half out of the water, and in that way he came upon us, and again struck the ship." —Owen Chase.

The whale crushed the bow like an eggshell, driving the 238-ton vessel backwards. The whale finally disengaged its head from the shattered timbers and swam off, never to be seen again, leaving the Essex quickly going down by the bow. Chase and the remaining sailors frantically tried to add rigging to the only remaining whaleboat, while the steward ran below to gather up whatever navigational aids he could find.

"The captain's boat was the first that reached us. He stopped about a boat's length off, but had no power to utter a single syllable; he was so completely overpowered with the spectacle before him. He was in a short time, however, enabled to address the inquiry to me, "My God, Mr. Chase, what is the matter?" I answered, "We have been stove by a whale." —Owen Chase.

Slasher
4th Mar 2013, 06:59
Yeh I have the odd whalemeat - tasty if the chef prepares it properly. Its pretty bloody
ordinary if you go to a street stall instead of an upmarket seafood restaurant.

...Strangely enough the bestest meat I've had is in China within the shore corridor from
S of Shangers to that place E of Honkers - and not Japan.

ArthurR
4th Mar 2013, 07:12
I may have done in the late 40's early 50's, when we still had rationing, but I was too young then to remember today
Quote from Wiki:

For a period of time during the post-World War II period (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aftermath_of_World_War_II) in the UnitedKingdom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom), corned whale meat was available as an unrationed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rationing_in_the_United_Kingdom) alternative toother meats. Sold under the name "whacon", the meat was described as"corned whalemeat with its fishy flavour removed", and as almostidentical to corned beef (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corned_beef), except "brownish instead ofred" The Food Ministry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_for_Environment,_Food_and_Rural_Affairs)emphasise d its "high food value".

ShyTorque
4th Mar 2013, 07:21
Whale meat? Again?

Don't know where, don't know when.

But I know whale meat again, some sunny day.

:}

sisemen
4th Mar 2013, 07:27
I suppose it would be OK. But I don't think I could eat a whole one thank you.

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Mar 2013, 07:38
It's just fuel. In the greater scheme of things there are probably easier ways to get hold of a chunk of protein, so I see it as more of an elitist/gourmet thing than a protein need.

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 07:42
In one of the Star Trek movie they had to carry a Whale in a stolen space shuttle (time machine and invisible at times too..) to save the earth in the future.

Any one remember that movie? Carrying a whale in a stolen space shuttle, only Star Trek could do it! :ok:

tony draper
4th Mar 2013, 07:47
Whales evolved for four legged critters about the size of a large dog that scuttled about on the land,not many prooners know that.
:)
On the other theory is that Jesus made em.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/i-6ee63c8a283e32331ee7cbe41384d23a-Velvet_Claw_hapalodectid_Aug-2009_zpsa315f91f.jpg

Old skool Alex
4th Mar 2013, 07:51
No, but I remember the south park episode when they sent a whale to the moon.

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 08:00
HAHA! Yes that one was funny... Inspired by Star Trek 4 probabely ;)

Slasher
4th Mar 2013, 08:02
Whales evolved for four legged critters

Same with dolphins Drapes.

sisemen
4th Mar 2013, 08:26
And four legged critters evolved into people who frequent PPRuNe

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSsC6FIIVRvUdKMRT26qMXEOl41FM4_Hd8gM8eDbb6 ou9PCwYJPAQ (http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&docid=BObsMAq3c5uQ-M&tbnid=IWYzfiX3Hd0rMM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fimgur.com%2Fgallery%2FCduyK&ei=qWg0UaXQIoO_lQWK2YH4BQ&bvm=bv.43148975,d.dGI&psig=AFQjCNF6VRN5aMvM-a21AT7wYlwgfAlzhA&ust=1362475546217476)

Groundgripper
4th Mar 2013, 08:31
I had whale meat once, in 1961 in a youth hostel in Norway (Geilo) during a school skiing trip.

None of us knew what it was and we were discussing what it might be when a local sitting opposite explained ("Waal, big fiske" while indicating a whale breathing).

I think the general reaction was "whale? OK, fair enough, I'm hungry and it tastes alright so I'll clear my plate". No-one objected or rushed off to the toilets making choking noises. From what I remember it was a dense meat with a texture rather like liver, but I can't remember its taste.

Never had it since, though. Never been offered it.

GG

Slasher
4th Mar 2013, 08:43
And four legged critters evolved into people who frequent PPRuNe


As well as those of us having evolved from other types of four leggers...

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTsc1dK23NwO8CVwEokMnXs3qPBzBFo4-hymaBRCXLsW05IS9Sv

Fliegenmong
4th Mar 2013, 08:47
Seriously, you'd f&*k a good lookin' rat Slash!!

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Mar 2013, 09:03
Bit of lipstick, drop of Chanel no5 behind the ears and under the paws, roll of duct tape to contain the shrapnel and Bob's yer auntie...:}

Tankertrashnav
4th Mar 2013, 09:07
Leaving aside the "endangered species" question I can't see that if you are going to eat one species there is any moral objection to eating another. I was once in a restaurant in a group one of whom was a young woman who frequently claimed to be a vegetarian. When I saw her tucking into lobster I challenged her on her vegetarianism, and she replied she had a rule that if she could stroke it, she wouldnt eat it. As she wouldnt stroke a lobster, it was ok to eat it!

There's no arguing with that sort of logic, so I let her get on with her lobster!

david1300
4th Mar 2013, 09:30
Well, there was no chance of a head job from that Sheila, then:O

27mm
4th Mar 2013, 09:50
Whale oil beef hooked! :E

Worrals in the wilds
4th Mar 2013, 10:15
No. Aren't they smart? Same with dolphins, elephants, monkeys, apes and similar? Shouldn't we stick with eating the dumb animals? Octopussies are also meant to be pretty intelligent and we eat them, so I suppose it's a bit subjective.

When I saw her tucking into lobster I challenged her on her vegetarianism, and she replied she had a rule that if she could stroke it, she wouldnt eat it. As she wouldnt stroke a lobster, it was ok to eat it!Call me horrible, but one of my most favourite experiences ever was catching a loudly vegetarian aquaintance (who spoiled many nights out with her rabid attacks on restaurant staff, not that she ever had the courtesy to call ahead :rolleyes:) hoofing into a Maccas burger at a local shopping centre. One text message frenzy later...:E

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 10:20
No. Aren't they smart? Same with dolphins, elephants, monkeys, apes and similar?Yes they are.
Wales are not fish.

probes
4th Mar 2013, 10:20
dumb animals
Worrals??! := From someone smart as you are? Do you think our beef or pork used to be less smart? (than dolphins, not you! :ouch:). Well, chicken are really kinda unintellignt, and roosters extremely so.

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 10:34
Porks are smarter than dogs, but we don't eat dogs... (well, where I live they do actually...).

Worrals in the wilds
4th Mar 2013, 10:35
I dunno. The rellies work with cattle and from what I've seen they're not big thinkers (the cattle, not the rellies :}). Likewise chooks and sheep. As long as they're humanely treated I don't have issues with eating them. The dairy industry? Different question, and one which most dairy producers would rather wasn't asked, particularly wrt the 'surplus' male calves and how dairy cattle are kept constantly in milk. :uhoh:

To me, whales and dophins are a bit higher up the scale. Sure, if I was starving on an island it would be different, but I'm not. Pork's a contentious one for me, and the older I get the less pork I eat. There's free range pork available now, but still...
Wales are not fish. I know.

probes
4th Mar 2013, 10:44
The rellies work with cattle and from what I've seen they're not big thinkers
because they're 'cattle' and you don't notice the individuals. My Mom used to have cows, usually 2-3, and I'd say 'pet cows' - absolute personalities. With grass preferences and behaviour patterns.
Once she also had 2 pigs, one of them was really wicked and the other one nice and playful. Didn't get any more, feels too bad to eat your own pig :(.
All our hens were kept for eggs and died of dignified old age, though :).

Worrals in the wilds
4th Mar 2013, 10:52
I was nearly gored by the prize bull so that could influence my opinion. :\

However, fair enough. So I'll ask the question; are you vegetarian? I know a few people who are for the reasons you state. No issue with that; it's their (your) personal decision and good for them if they stand by their principles. :ok:

I'm not. TBQH it doesn't bother me that much. I take an interest in the production line behind the meat I buy (which isn't too hard in Australia, most of our meat is still grass fed) but I don't stop eating animals. However, cetations, apes, elephants and dogs are above the line for me. I'm not expecting anyone else to fall in with that, but it's my own POV. I don't like seeing cetations in captivity, either. I don't think it's natural for an animal that has a huge territory in the wild to live in a little pond and do tricks twice a day. That's just me. :}

probes
4th Mar 2013, 11:01
I was nearly gored by the prize bull so that could influence my opinion.
see, must have been intelligent enough to aim at you? :ouch:

As for being veg... no, I'm as hypocritical as the rest (well, most) of our species and I love pork and chicken... provided they're not my pets and I don't see how it gets on my plate. :sad: Moose sausage is also good (smoked), but I have deep suspicion for lamb and any other meat. Don't eat fish for its taste. Which reminds me - killing small fish is not a nanogram less cruel - mostly they are just left on the deck or riverbank to gasp for air and die. They're mute, therefore don't count, I guess.

But I do eat lots of rabbit-food, dunno why. Basil and rukola... mmm!

P.S I joined Mom in summer mostly, and you could see the cows were happy to see me again, some even licked my hands like dogs. They also have strict herd hierarchy, and some are obeyed, some not. One of ours was extra nasty, when coming home she always run around a little (or more, several Milky Ways could have been created), came last then, and peeped from behind the barn corner (imagine a cow peeping, and she really did, one eye and all!), and if you went there, she was extra amused and ran a little more. If you took no notice, she just came to her 'bed' in the barn and tried to get something tasty form someone's feeder on the way.

radeng
4th Mar 2013, 11:27
I've never tried whale meat, because firstly, I've never seen it on a menu, and secondly, my parents and brother told me it tasted awful, thus putting me off. They had it sometime at the end of WW2 or just after.

To quote Larousse Gastronomique:

"The flesh of this cetacean is most indigestible and remains tough even after 24 hours cooking."

It goes on to say:

"From the gastronomical point of view, only whale calves are of any interest."

It can be prepared like tuna.

Larousse again

"There are not many recipes for whale meat. Dr. Felix Bremont tells how he had occasion to eat whale meat in 1892 in a restaurant near Les Halles (in Paris): I will not say anything bad about whale meat but neither can I find it in me to say anything good about it. Boil a piece of lean beef in water which has been used to wash a not too fresh mackerel, and you will have a dish similar to that which was served to me under the name 'Escalope of whale a la Valois'."

So there you have it. Not, with me at least, a sought after delicacy.

Worrals in the wilds
4th Mar 2013, 11:31
Which reminds me - killing small fish is not a nanogram less cruel - mostly they are just left on the deck or riverbank to gasp for air and die. They're mute, therefore don't count, I guess.
This annoys me. Vegos who won't eat meat because it's cruel but hoe into fish at every opportunity. Vegos who only eat white meat. Vegos who are only vegos when their friends are watching (a la the Macca's Queen :hmm:)... There's a lot of pretend activism around.

It's like the people who get all riled up about feral horses being culled but don't give a damn about the 40,000 failed racehorses and unwanted ponies who get sent off to the doggers every year. Do a google on horse culling Australia and you'll find lots of outrage about brumbies but next to nothing about racehorses, although the numbers are about the same. Another dirty little industry secret they'd rather people didn't think about.

radeng
4th Mar 2013, 11:35
Worrals,

Do they really go for pet food, or do they get into the human food chain, unkown to the public, as they do here?

500N
4th Mar 2013, 11:40
Some interesting views coming out :O

"you'll find lots of outrage about brumbies but next to nothing about racehorses, although the numbers are about the same. Another dirty little industry secret they'd rather people didn't think about."

Like the whales, follow the publicity, tug the heart strings,
follow the money boys !


radeng
Some go into pet food.

radeng
4th Mar 2013, 11:42
And the rest into the famous (infamous) Oz meat pies?

Worrals in the wilds
4th Mar 2013, 11:43
Do they really go for pet food, or do they get into the human food chain, unkown to the public, as they do here? If they do, the scandal hasn't broken yet. It will be interesting to see...
By law horse meat used to be died blue when it was butchered to prevent substitution for beef, but I believe they dropped that requirement a few years ago due to pressure from export markets. Aussie racehorse meat is popular in Europe and dying it blue didn't help that :yuk:. It's not illegal to sell horsemeat for human consumption here (provided it's labelled as such), but it's not popular.

As for the pies, you'd be lucky if it's horse...:uhoh::} It's all in the labelling. Camel, anyone?

Slasher
4th Mar 2013, 11:43
There's nothing wrong in killing stuff if you intend to use it or eat it. Tis the Law of
Nature - you don't see the lions and cheetahs getting fluffed off by the giraffes and
elephants do you.

As Drapes (I think) once said we talking monkeys are no different in instinct than any
other hunting animal.

Killing for sport (one arrogance of the modern human) is one thing - but killing to eat
is entirely different.

beaufort1
4th Mar 2013, 12:11
I've eaten whale twice, once in Greenland and once last year in Iceland. Not sure of the type in Greenland but it was definitely Minke in Iceland.
Coming from a small island I've eaten lots of things out of the sea, you get brought up with it. Elder relatives wouldn't see things the same way we do now, they wouldn't be deliberately cruel to anything, but is just the way it is.
I've sat on the fence a bit in regard to whale hunting, I've been lucky enough to see humpbacks in both the Atlantic and the Pacific, we often get visited by minke and pilot whales locally, we once even saw a fin whale pass close to our boat. I think what troubles me most is the fact that there doesn't appear to be a quick kill when hunting these leviathans. Hunting some species to near extinction is unnecessary, there are alternatives to anything the whales give us.
Certainly in Iceland there was an awareness that the tourist £ is going to increase if visitors can see cetaceans in the ocean on organised whale watching trips, they have more economic value alive than on the plate. This may sound cynical but at the end of the day it seems everything boils down (excuse the pun :}) to money.

500N
4th Mar 2013, 12:16
Worrals

"Camel, anyone?"

According to friends, Camel steaks are great.
Just so much of it !


If you are going to substitute anything for beef in this country
it wouldn't be with horses but Kangaroo. Which is good as it
tastes great !

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 12:18
I do believe we eat too much meat.

We should eat a bit less meat, but higher quality. Quantity versus quality.

We are a bit hypocrit and cynical when we eat pork but no dog, beef but no horse, but I can do with it, this is our culture.

I would feel unconfortable though if I had to eat a dolphin, an elephant, or a bonobo (or any monkey...). We are tought the evolution is an ongoing thing, it is possible dolphin or elephants will build civilisation soon in the next future, like in 100,000 years for example (elephants already almost "burry" their dead and have cemeteries)... I don't want to face them at that time saying I use to eat them...

500N
4th Mar 2013, 12:19
"Certainly in Iceland there was an awareness that the tourist £ is going to increase if visitors can see cetaceans in the ocean on organised whale watching trips, they have more economic value alive than on the plate."


beaufort

Not cyncical at all. It does boil down to the $$$$$.

The Greenies use it the other way to extract money.

But as you have pointed out, it can be beneficial to more
than just those who use a knife and fork !!!

KAG
4th Mar 2013, 12:20
Probes: My Mom used to have cows, usually 2-3, and I'd say 'pet cows' - absolute personalities.well, she knew what she was doing because if you have only one cow, cows being very social animals, there is a good chance that the animal becomes crazy.

probes
4th Mar 2013, 12:57
if you have only one cowit started with just one, but they never did get lonely, though, they had Mom :).
Well, she really loved them like people like dogs. Love works wonders.
And dogs don't give milk.


they have more economic value alive than on the platereally well said. Also shows people (as a species) have become wealthy enough for that?

Davaar
4th Mar 2013, 13:51
Not a chance. The question reminds me of a TV ad that used to appear here. It showed a dialogue between husband (H) and wife (W):

W: Would you like some *****?
H: No, thank you.
W: Why not?
H: I don't like it.
W: How do you know you don't like it? You've never even tried it.
H: I know. I've never tried it because I don't like it.

The moral was intended to be: "What a Silly-Billy is stodgy old H!"

Wasted on me, for sure. I understood H perfectly; stood and stand firmly with him.

Again as they used to say in the days that are gone: "Happiness is knowing your brand of cigarette, and smoking it".

Besides, used to know an Inuit in the far cold North. He liked polar bear meat, so he said; but he also said: "But you [i.e., Davaar] would not!" A scholar.

pigboat
4th Mar 2013, 14:04
Carrying a whale in a stolen space shuttle, only Star Trek could do it!
William Shatner had gained a bit of weight, had he?

Thar she blows!
http://d24w6bsrhbeh9d.cloudfront.net/photo/4425742_700b.jpg

Rossian
4th Mar 2013, 14:35
.....there was a period towards the end of and immediately after the last great European unpleasantness when whale meat was an addition the the very meagre meat ration. Sometimes one saw it on railway trolleys in stations - great purpley/reddish blocks of slowly thawing whalemeat. Don't remember it being very tasty.

The Ancient Mariner

To quote FSL "young 'uns, they'd never believe you". It really was a fairly dire period in one's life.

tony draper
4th Mar 2013, 14:48
Wonder what Walruses taste like? apparently one of their kind has appeared round these parts this week attracting many Walrus twitchers.
That's all we need millions of Bulgars Romanians and now Walrusses.
:uhoh:

MagnusP
4th Mar 2013, 14:50
FSL, it's orf now. Check ricardian's freezer.

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Mar 2013, 14:52
If it's anything like seal, hardly worth the effort unless you haven't eaten in about ten days.


Of course, they Alaskan and Canadian fellas with the spears may disagree.

pigboat
4th Mar 2013, 16:38
Walrus is kinda fishy, more so than seal. I prefer seal to have been frozen before being cooked, then fried in lard with lots of onions.

Here's one delicacy I shall never try, armpit and foot cheese. (http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Right+Chemistry+Limburger+cheese+attracts+flies+Because+smel ls+like+feet/8037899/story.html)

Mac the Knife
4th Mar 2013, 16:46
Enough cream, brandy and Madagascar green peppers and pretty much anything will be palatable...

[The Rev. William Buckland (William Buckland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Buckland)) was an English eccentric who clained to have eaten his way through the entire animal kingdom.]

"His passion for scientific observation and experiment extended to his home life. Not only was his house filled with specimens – animal as well as mineral, live as well as dead – but he claimed to have eaten his way through the animal kingdom: zoophagy. The most distasteful items were mole and bluebottle; panther, crocodile and mouse were among the other dishes noted by guests."

Mac

:ok:

con-pilot
4th Mar 2013, 17:09
I ate whale meat (?) in Iceland once.

I will not bother me in the least if I never taste it again, ever.

And if you think vegetarians are hard to please, try to please Vegans. :uhoh:

The list of what they refuse to eat would fill a book, a large book. A good friend of ours wife is a pure Vegan, she will not come to our home because we cook and eat meat, or to anyone else's home that does.

She's about 5'5" tall and weighs about 98 pounds and looks terrible. Pale complexion, dark shadows under her eyes and looks like she could drop dead any second.

rgbrock1
4th Mar 2013, 17:13
So, con, describe the taste of the whale you ate: I'm curious. Fishy, like Blue fish?

Vegans. An unhealthy bunch they are. Missing some very vital proteins and minerals which, try as they might, will not be obtained from any other source. One of the reasons so many of them look like the walking dead. (And most of them, or at least the ones I know, are much more prone to illness.)

hellsbrink
4th Mar 2013, 17:20
And if you think vegetarians are hard to please, try to please Vegans.

The list of what they refuse to eat would fill a book, a large book. A good friend of ours wife is a pure Vegan, she will not come to our home because we cook and eat meat, or to anyone else's home that does.

She's about 5'5" tall and weighs about 98 pounds and looks terrible. Pale complexion, dark shadows under her eyes and looks like she could drop dead any second.

Just remind her that if we weren't supposed to eat meat, bacon would taste worse than sprouts.

Then spray some

http://cache.gizmodo.com/assets/images/4/2011/04/baconcologne1.jpg

and ask her if she would rather wear the sprout version

deptrai
4th Mar 2013, 18:22
I understand the argument that they suffer unduly when harpooned and therefore the killing process is cruel and should not be allowed. But is that the only reason we have for not wanting to eat them.

Modern whalers use Penthrite (explosive) grenades, aimed at the brain, detonated by an impact fuze with a brief delay to reach a pre-determined depth.

http://luna.pos.to/whale/img/gen_con_pro_005A.jpg

You literally blow their brains out. Bloody, and messy, but a direct hit to the brain with an explosive grenade probably isn't any more cruel, and shouldn't induce more suffering than any other hunting technique used for other animals, in my humble opinion

I assume visibility, sea state, and operator skill level can affect the outcome, but theoretically, that should be manageable, if "humane" killing is a top priority.

con-pilot
4th Mar 2013, 18:36
So, con, describe the taste of the whale you ate

Salty, as I put a lot of salt on it so I could eat it. :p

con-pilot
4th Mar 2013, 18:37
bacon would taste worse than sprouts.



I don't trust anyone that doesn't like bacon. :suspect:

Tankertrashnav
4th Mar 2013, 19:06
Daughter's a vegan. Struggles to keep her weight down, in fact if I'm brutally honest, she is definitely on the chubby side. Last time she saw 98lbs on the scales was (I'm guessing) when she was about 14 (she's 35). She has absolutely no problem with sharing a table with her omnivorous parents when she comes to stay. Funny thing is her partner is a Muslim and she has turned the tables, with her dietary requirements more restrictive than his! She has a demanding full time job - I can't remember the last time she took a day off sick. So much for your scrawny unhealthy stereotype, rgb.

Ooh Ive just thought - a vegan with a Muslim partner - I can almost imagine the mouth foaming going on among the usual suspects on JB ;)

500N
4th Mar 2013, 19:36
deleted due to double post.

500N
4th Mar 2013, 19:36
"Ooh Ive just thought - a vegan with a Muslim partner - I can almost imagine the mouth foaming going on among the usual suspects on JB http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif"


Yep, you'd only have to feed one type of meat
to offend both of them :rolleyes:

notmyC150v2
4th Mar 2013, 22:26
Its odd that it is described as being tough. I thought that it would be extremely tender given the size of the animal and the amount of blubber. I had guessed that there would be significant marbling, but then fish is very lean. So much for my culinary credentials.

I have never been overly squeamish in choosing what meat to eat, even after touring several poultry processing plants for work (the kill room is very confronting the first time) and look forward to trying some of the following,

Camel
Water Buffalo (wild in NT and a pest)
Turtle
Grouper (protected species on the GB Reef but not sure if it is protected everywhere)

As for whale, well the flavour reports are somewhat alarming Boil a piece of lean beef in water which has been used to wash a not too fresh mackerel, and you will have a dish similar to that which was served to me under the name 'Escalope of whale a la Valois??? Yuck!:eek:

500N
4th Mar 2013, 22:36
NotmyC150

If you are in Melbourne, I can give you some Water Buffalo.
Send me a PM.

Re turtle, whatever you do make sure it is cooked well,
I pulled a leg off one once and it was Yuk to say the least.
I sometimes think Aboriginals just don't cook some food
enough :O

And if you get to try Turtle you might be with Abos
so if they offer you Fruit Bat, stay away from it :rolleyes:

reynoldsno1
4th Mar 2013, 22:43
I've eaten whale twice, a long time ago - once in Reykjavik, and again a while later in Andoya. It was quite dark, little fat and rather chewy - to be honest, I can't remember what it tasted like, so it was probably lacking in that sensory area. I do remember the reindeer was rather nice ...

notmyC150v2
4th Mar 2013, 22:53
500N - Alas I am in Qld. Thanks for the offer though.

I lived with Aboriginals for a few years when young and missed the opportunity to try turtle. Unfortunately I took the opportunity to try Stingray Balls. :yuk: :yuk: There just aren't enough puke emotes to do it justice.

As for Reindeer, I remember fondly visiting the Deer Park on the old Bruce Highway at Nambour and feeding the cute deer with corn...

and then eating them in the cafe afterward.

Strange mixed messages there.

500N
4th Mar 2013, 22:56
Corn fed deer, very nice indeed.

Ancient Mariner
5th Mar 2013, 05:37
notmyC150v2, meat from whale, like any other mammal may be tough or tender depending on which part of the body and how it has been treated. Totally lean as all fat is in the blubber. I think I'll put some on the menu for the coming weekend. :E
Per

sisemen
5th Mar 2013, 08:03
TT - Muslim? Bloody VEGAN????!!!!!

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSjBMQ6c7Yiac34_Dk_SeduJZ9pfvIZPYOJZt9G9HK alp2HTqJ9gA (http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&docid=RdFOPwxQBFAC7M&tbnid=Grtl0b9oesO7wM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.struckbyheatlightning.********.com%2F&ei=VbQ1UcveB7TUyQHIuYGoAQ&bvm=bv.43148975,d.dGI&psig=AFQjCNFAFA1aWzVvOfux1Nh5pEjEoPwW3g&ust=1362560420581253)

421dog
5th Mar 2013, 13:43
I con cur about the corn fed deer.. Have eaten most of this years bounty already:(
I've actually got a few cans of whale meat around the house. (Mrs. 421 brought it back from Norway) It really goes well with beer, crackers and cheese. It also makes a really interesting chili.

Davaar
5th Mar 2013, 13:57
.....there was a period

'Twas the era, Roosian, I think, of Dr Edith Summerskill. That name conveys a hint of the Northerner. She was rather keen on snoek as well, despite the mockery and sales resistance of an unbelieving proletariat. Neither the whale nor the snoek featured large, or even at all, on the Davaar household diet, although we lived for a while in the East Neuk of Fife.

A propos, through the mists I do recall the lady who observed: "There a loat a brens in Pittenweem, ye ken: It's a' the fish!" I hope translation is not needed, but it is available on demand.

Perhaps she was right on effect and cause.

Davaar
5th Mar 2013, 14:43
I sometimes think Aboriginals just don't cook some food
enough

This present post is especially for 500 and Cooda Shooda. I have never met either, but I worry for both. They live in Australia, you see. That is a very dangerous place.

We have all known all along about the noxious spiders and snakes there, enough on their own to keep me far away. Then there were those big frogs, or were they toads, that infested the place. Maybe still do.

Of late, though, I have added a channel to the TV, billed as "History", but largely about OZ, and its widespread "croc" industry. It is the habit of Abos and even Great White Hunters to go in search of crocs in -- Yes! The billabongs! -- and in rather small boats.

The Abos (usually the No 2 i/c boat; probably saving up for their own one) are assisted by trad dances, chants, invocations of ancestors' help, and dressing up in home-made white paste, but for my dollar I would not put too much trust in those. That's just by the way. I could be wrong, of course, and they seem to know what they are doing.

The chap No 1 i/c the boat remarks to the viewer that one never knows what a croc will do, but if it catches you, "It's all over, Rover". I believe him. I'm not too good at swimming anyway.

Boat approaches croc; chap No 1 i/c stands in bow with sort of harpoon; throws harpoon at croc; hits croc; annoys croc, which left to me I would not touch, but who am I to say? I see the croc's point of view. Croc shows annoyance by attacking small boat; chap's No 2 i/c lifts small calibre rifle; No 2 i/c shoots croc in brain, using I note a telescope sight at about three feet range, max; maybe the Abos are short-sighted; if lucky, Abo hits croc in brain, which brain is small, but big enough in my view; croc dies; chaps pull it on board; deliver croc to Government; collect bounty money at a quoted rate per foot of length. A really good croc is 12' or more, but they all look big to me. "The Hell!", I say, "With the 14-footer; just let it go".

Sometimes they vary the trick, and for their own reasons want to capture the croc alive. You will already have thought of the jaws problem. Quite right too. To counter the jaws threat they use a bit of string, called "the snout rope", or maybe "string", which No 2 i/c wraps round the upper and lower mandibles. Heh! Heh!

That immobilises them. Seems to me that these No 2 i/c chaps have a hi-risk occupation and I hope the Great White Hunter cuts them in to a fair share in the bounty. Yes, I do hope so.

We have nothing like that in Ottawa. I hope 500 and Cooda are not so foolish as to buy the wee boat, hire the Abo and .22 calibre, and go off after the croc. Not worth it, I say, but I expect everyone does it in OZ. Just like tennis, really.

I know that Solid Rust lives in wild places too. I think of him as well.

Now back to the billabong. Believe it or not, the local children (or "kids", in the modern idiom), although aware of the crocs that have lived in the billabong for the past million years or so, are in the habit of swimming in said billabongs. "The ol' swimming hole". Stupid kids.

tony draper
5th Mar 2013, 14:46
There was a rather eccentric old lady in the sixties used to eat nowt but nuts,she would walk all the way to John o Groats turn round and walk all the way to lands end,turn around and walk all the way to lands ect ect,I remember the news media were a tad obsessed with her,this was before the celeb culture was shat upon our land.:)
It is good to live in a land where the largest carnivore is the Stoat Mr Davaar.
:uhoh:

Rossian
5th Mar 2013, 14:57
......Dr Barbara... Barbara.....it'll come to me in a minute (or more likely at 3AM).
No thanks to you FSL this 'll be annoying me all evening.

The Ancient Mariner

The SSK
5th Mar 2013, 15:16
Let me put you out of your misery Rossian

On second thoughts, maybe not just yet :E

(Hint: you are right about the Barbara bit)

Rossian
5th Mar 2013, 18:34
...Toerag!! I thought for a minute that it might have been Woodhouse - but then remembered "WALKIES!" (a phrase that was guaranteed to get our bearded collie from a deep slumber to a salivating panting embodiment of anticipation with her lead in her mouth in about 1.5 nanosecs)

The Ancient Mariner

tony draper
5th Mar 2013, 19:45
I think she was also a Doctor so it were Dr Barbra summat or other,I promise I cant remember either,and I refuse to resort to Google.:uhoh:

Mike X
5th Mar 2013, 20:07
Had a buxom lass (or two) in my time.

Extremely succulent.

Slasher
5th Mar 2013, 21:27
Would depend on the whale Mike I suppose? :}

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT_UMxwbmobX8AXwn1-U7S0y83QpHm2GU2DvZZd5lLfR9GyWC9Z

Mike X
5th Mar 2013, 21:36
Jeez, Slash, nothing like that.

Let's just say, a handle or two and superb begging jugs.

Nevertheless, super succulent. Found the skinnies dry. ;)