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probes
3rd Mar 2013, 11:23
and the humans think they're smart... :hmm:

Michael Dickinson: How a fly flies | Video on TED.com (http://www.ted.com/talks/michael_dickinson_how_a_fly_flies.html)

Slasher
3rd Mar 2013, 13:59
Flies are powered by Merlin engines and can be real dumb!

NQwzsmHSHW0

Starts at 2:00.

El Grifo
3rd Mar 2013, 14:10
WTF ?????
I Love it :D :D

probes
3rd Mar 2013, 14:25
:D and motivated by ladybirds!
can be real dumb!
Absolutely. Anybody can. :E

Windy Militant
3rd Mar 2013, 14:39
We'ved loaned a lot of equipment to these guys who have done an awful lot of work on this.
Animal Flight Group Oxford Zoology Department.
We had a slightly clearer video which they gave us for our web gallery but we lost it when guess who changed all the AVI codecs. :ugh:
This is one from their own web pages
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~zool0261/Mov2.mov

603DX
3rd Mar 2013, 16:30
Michael Dickinson's final adage, "Think before you swat" is almost one of the basic tenets of Buddhism, which prohibits swatting the insects at all, in case they are the reincarnation of previous creatures' existence, including mankind. So this concept of pausing to think about the bewildering complexity of the neurological system of the bug you are about to splat with the rolled-up newspaper, seems likely to achieve much the same end results as Buddhism. In short, it will prolong the average lifespan of the bugs, by allowing them time to buzz clear of your delayed-action swatting action, laughing their incredibly high-pitched little laughs at the gullibility of these clumsy human creatures! It appears possible that his years of close specialisation in bug behaviour have allowed the pesky little buzzers ample opportunity to influence his mind into a pro-bug stance.

My advice would be to ignore his ill-founded adage, as probably representing a piece of subliminally implanted bug propaganda that the cunning little devils have transmitted to discourage swatting by delaying tactics. Don't believe the message, it's probably tainted and unreliable, and CARRY ON SWATTING! ;)

lomapaseo
3rd Mar 2013, 19:25
Flies are like Harley riders, really dumb as a group

axefurabz
3rd Mar 2013, 19:44
So, when are we going to hook-up a pilot or two??? :suspect:

pigboat
3rd Mar 2013, 20:22
If you pull the wings off a fly it becomes a walk.

probes
4th Mar 2013, 04:38
his ill-founded adage
yeah, agree, although the way they move and flap their tiny wings is really impressive. If I remember correctly there was much fuss about the bigger flies landing on ceilings (when do they turn, and how).
For the tiny flies a vaccuum cleaner is most efficient in my experience. :E

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Mar 2013, 05:41
Don't even have to pull the wings off, Mr Piggy. One spent a year on a small island in the Antarctic and the local flies had evolved very small rudimentary wings to avoid being blown out to sea by the high winds there. Their method of travel was a kind of elongated jump accompanied by loud buzzing and much effort, followed by a crash landing, but no real flight took place. One could almost imagine the sirens and flashing lights on the support vehicles when they hit (beetles would have made good crash tenders, trundling out to the LZ). They could run like hell, though. We called them walks as well...

fernytickles
4th Mar 2013, 11:01
Not crashes?

Don't even have to pull the wings off, Mr Piggy. One spent a year on a small island in the Antarctic and the local flies had evolved very small rudimentary wings to avoid being blown out to sea by the high winds there. Their method of travel was a kind of elongated jump accompanied by loud buzzing and much effort, followed by a crash landing, but no real flight took place. One could almost imagine the sirens and flashing lights on the support vehicles when they hit (beetles would have made good crash tenders, trundling out to the LZ). They could run like hell, though. We called them walks as well...

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Mar 2013, 11:07
They didn't do much leaping about outdoors either, due to the high winds. Walked a lot though.


I used to enjoy using a fly sucker on flies in the Sudan. Anything to pass the time in flight. The tsetse flies were the best as they're strong buggers. Let them settle down on the dash or elsewhere then slowly sneak up on them with the fly sucker. At first it's no bother and they just sit there, but as you creep closer, they start having to grip quite firmly in order to avoid being ejected overboard. Gets to a point where they're hanging on for dear life, gritting their mandibles and shaking in the hurricane the fly sucker is causing around them. Eventually they just can't hold on and get sucked into the tube and spat out into the slipstream 10000' above the ground. Must come as quite a shock to them if they survive and don't get sucked into the engine or hit part of the airframe.