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Sunnyjohn
1st Mar 2013, 11:13
I'm reading Zero Day by David Baldacci and thoroughly enjoying it. However, the thought came to me that many adjectives in everyday US English are aggressive words. Here's few examples; I am aware that some of these have now entered British English, presumably via the tabloids, although the broadsheets also use some of them now, I notice:

Hit the streets-------------------------Published, in the sense of news.
Hit the mouse ----------------------- Click the mouse
Hit the gas -------------------------- Accelerate
Snap ---------------------------------Switch on (light switch)
Slam Dunk ------------------------- I actually don't know what this means!
Punch in information --------------- Enter information
Smash ------------------------------ Road, rail accident
Shoved across ---------------------- Passed, as in passing paper or a folder
Slam into --------------------------- Hit

Now, I need to say that this is not a criticism of the US or its language; we have good friends in Massachusetts and Mrs SJ has a distant relative in Arizona. I did try to google the question but the poor old search engine was nonplussed! I am, therefore, with my interest in the English Language, curious.

603DX
1st Mar 2013, 11:21
Er ... don't you mean verbs, Sunnyjohn? ;)

Sunnyjohn
1st Mar 2013, 11:24
Whoops - thank you 603 :\

flynverted
1st Mar 2013, 11:37
Just finished The Sixth Man and Hells Corner. Quite enjoy David Baldacci :ok:

seacue
1st Mar 2013, 11:55
I fancy that I speak American English. Many of those phases strike me as a strained effort to be hip or at least 1920s/30s hip. . I must lead a sheltered life, since I haven't heard some of them.

Hit the mouse ----------------------- Click the mouse
My friends who did a UNIX port for IBM said that Big Blue demanded changes when they wrote "Hit the Escape key" IBM thought "hitting" a key was too aggressive.

Hit the gas -------------------------- Accelerate
A bit quaint.

Snap ---------------------------------Switch on (light switch)
Also "It's a snap", very easy.

Slam Dunk ------------------------- I actually don't know what this means!
Basketball. very easy basket. By extension, something very easy to accomplish.

Smash ------------------------------ Road, rail accident
As in "smash into". As a noun, sounds like an effort to use British slang.
One might smash a finger with a hammer.

Shoved across ---------------------- Passed, as in passing paper or a folder
Maybe among persons doing nefarious dealings.

Slam into --------------------------- Hit
See "smash into" above.

beaufort1
1st Mar 2013, 12:25
Now that's interesting, I knew 'slam dunk' was to do with scoring a basket in basketball, but I didn't realise it was for an 'easy' basket. Learn something every day. :)

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Mar 2013, 12:27
Slam dunk = fait accompli.

Seeing as we're discussing English and all, and all.....:}

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 12:31
No, a slam dunk is not for an "easy basket". It is a colloquialism used to describe a task which is easily performed, requiring not too much effort.

Snap, for switching on a light, is not something I've ever heard in this context.

Ditto smash for describing a road or rail accident. I have only heard, or used, the word crash to describe the same.

I too enjoy reading Baldacci.

The SSK
1st Mar 2013, 12:32
Hit town
Hit the road
Hit the sack
Hit the bottle
Hit the high spots
Hit the dancefloor

Quite a versatile little word

wings folded
1st Mar 2013, 12:37
hit was time hit was happreciated

gerry111
1st Mar 2013, 12:42
In OZ, motor vehicles damaged in road accidents are repaired by Smash Repairers.

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 12:43
What is the meaning of your sentence, wings? (Is the sun down over the yardarm there in the UK? Oh, i thought so!!!!)

charliegolf
1st Mar 2013, 13:41
Slam Dunk.

No doubt, point blank, can't miss. As in, the ball is not thrown, but 'stuffed beyond doubt', into the ring. Oo-er Missus!

CG

airship
1st Mar 2013, 13:52
Dunk 'em donuts (or just dunk 'em when water-boarding)... :ok:

wings folded
1st Mar 2013, 14:07
What is the meaning of your sentence, wings?


Probably not very drole, but if you have spent any time in company with Jamaicans or other West Indian islanders, you would recognise the intrusive "haitch" before any vowel.

Reading so many "hit"s I kept thinking of "it"

Stone cold sober, I fear, but may attend to that later on.

stuckgear
1st Mar 2013, 14:08
f**k

Noun, adjective and verb.

done !

The SSK
1st Mar 2013, 14:16
Adjective?

Only when 'all' is a noun.

Gertrude the Wombat
1st Mar 2013, 14:30
My friends who did a UNIX port for IBM said that Big Blue demanded changes when they wrote "Hit the Escape key" IBM thought "hitting" a key was too aggressive.
We once had to change "abort" to "cancel" because, we were told, "abort" wasn't acceptable to the American market.

The SSK
1st Mar 2013, 14:31
They even call tits 'chickadees'.

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 14:33
Isn't 'abort' or 'cancel' called an 'abend' in the IBM world? I seem to recall that from my early JCL days.

The SSK:

I have never heard boobs referred to as chickadees. Tits yes. Chickadees no.

arcniz
1st Mar 2013, 14:35
Individual authors, in virtually every imaginable era and place, adopt a "style" of writing that becomes a notable component of their platform and manner for communication.

Such styles usually are somewhat artificial in form and idiom -- for the sake of distinctiveness, and so the author can consistently remember the differences between the stylized voice of the writer versus the personal & private idiom of him or herself.

Some authors deliberately change style with each work, while others will repeat and evolve from an early assumed style to a more mature one over a series of works.

Suggestion is: Likely will not be wise to infer great principles of life or culture from the idiosyncrasies of an individual writer's style in a single work.

Sunnyjohn
1st Mar 2013, 15:18
Hit the gas -------------------------- Accelerate
A bit quaint.
Just got this from the online site Mobile1:
News Item: A woman, who was driving a neighbor's car, crashed into her own house, through the kitchen, out the back, across the yard, through the fence, across the alley and into a ditch. "It accelerated and the brakes wouldn't work," she said.
You'll notice by the spelling of neighbor (!) that it's a US site. There were a lot like this when I did a google. Obviously not that quaint!

Sunnyjohn
1st Mar 2013, 15:24
Individual authors, in virtually every imaginable era and place, adopt a "style" of writing that becomes a notable component of their platform and manner for communication.

Absolutely right Arcniz. However, and I didn't really make the point clear, I was referring to everyday English as used in the media. Although there is a move towards the style of using aggressive verbs in the UK, it doesn't, to me, seem as pronounced as in the US.

con-pilot
1st Mar 2013, 16:41
Hit the streets-------------------------Published, in the sense of news.
Hit the mouse ----------------------- Click the mouse
Hit the gas -------------------------- Accelerate
Snap ---------------------------------Switch on (light switch)
Slam Dunk ------------------------- I actually don't know what this means!
Punch in information --------------- Enter information
Hit the streets-------------------------Published, in the sense of news.
Hit the mouse ----------------------- Click the mouse
Hit the gas -------------------------- Accelerate
Snap ---------------------------------Switch on (light switch)
Slam Dunk ------------------------- I actually don't know what this means!
Punch in information --------------- Enter information
Smash ------------------------------ Road, rail accident
Shoved across ---------------------- Passed, as in passing paper or a folder
Slam into --------------------------- Hit
Shoved across ---------------------- Passed, as in passing paper or a folder
Slam into --------------------------- Hit


Hmm,

Smash ------------------------------ Road, rail accident

Can't say I've heard that word here for that reason. I've heard it used for 'I'm going to smash your face.' 'I'm going to smash it.' meaning a physical object. But for a type of accident, not that much.

Shoved across ---------------------- Passed, as in passing paper or a folder

Nope.

Slam into --------------------------- Hit

Slammed into, yes. Such as 'I slammed my car into a tree'. Or 'I slammed the door in his face'.

And finally

Snap ---------------------------------Switch on (light switch)

I've never heard that term used that way, ever. Now I've heard and used the experssion of 'Oh snap!', meaning I just thought of this, or now I understand that now.

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 16:49
con-pilot wrote:

Now I've heard and used the experssion of 'Oh snap!', meaning I just thought of this, or now I understand that now.

That's very gentlemanly of you con. Usually I just say "Oh shit!".

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2013, 16:53
Abnormal end - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abnormal_end)

con-pilot
1st Mar 2013, 16:53
You win RG. :ok:

GrumpyOldFart
1st Mar 2013, 17:24
Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump (http://history.alberta.ca/headsmashedin/default.aspx)

Slasher
1st Mar 2013, 17:50
The only US term which I find can be confusing is boner -

US English..................an erect dick
Rest of the world.........a female who invokes, by her looks alone, an erect dick.

...Thus if rgb says he has a boner I'd presume he has an attractive buxom chick
in tow. If I said I have a boner at home he'd think I have a hard-on in the living
room. This would lead to justifiable confusion in complex communication unless
the differences were known.

My boner should be presently upstairs asleep right now.

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 18:05
Slasher:

Your erect dick is upstairs asleep? WTF? :eek::eek::eek:

Does it have its own bed? Do you cover it as well? (Good night my lovely penis. Sleep tight and don't let the bed bugs bite. Or. Now I lay thee down to sleep. I pray thee lord my penis to keep.)

But I do understand. However, explain to this Yank the difference in meaning for "fanny."

From what I understand (which isn't much) a fanny here in the U.S. is used to describe ones buttocks. Usually the word is spoken as such by children.

Thus, we here in the U.S. also have, what we call, fanny packs.
You know, a place to put loose items like keys, condoms and the sort which is attached around the waist.

On the other hand I understand a fanny - in the UK and its colonies - is a part of a woman which we men (well, most of us anyway) enjoy so much.

How do you explain that little enigma in word usage? Hmmmm? :}:}:}

clark y
1st Mar 2013, 18:09
Hey Slasher,
That reminded me of the Aussie v's English meaning for spunk...........The Aussie meaning will cause a load of the English meaning.

wings folded
1st Mar 2013, 18:11
Where in all this do you place the groin meltingly delicious French actress Fanny Ardent?

An ardent fanny must be every proper man's dream.

cavortingcheetah
1st Mar 2013, 18:12
Full of spunk used to be US slang for gutsy. Not now perhaps the phrase to use to describe a female slam dunker?

Slasher
1st Mar 2013, 18:14
Well if a US bloke was to say my missus has a very nice fanny I'd be asking
her who the hell she's been shagging!

Dunno why this cross-Pond difference. I'm sure it's started wars. A fanny is a
fanny and that should be that.

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR6v__oyjsbszdB83BFPfS8qwX4UPbebhAj38Vf9Om LPZ2uuU_B

True clark - if a English bloke was to tell me my missus was full of spunk I'd
wonder how the buggery did he know I just shagged her!! :confused:

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 18:18
No, Slasher, this is a fanny.

http://www.aestheticup.com/images/plastic-surgery-buttocks-implants-aesthetic-up.jpg

And this is a big one

http://www.internetweekly.org/images/rachael_rays_buttocks.jpg

samusi01
1st Mar 2013, 18:21
Ruthlessly -albeit fruitlessly, given the recent picture - dragging this thread back towards the original topic:

Could some of those be regional within the U.S.? For example, points farther south of me "mash" the same button I'd "push" or "hit".

Have to agree with conpilot's smash - always a crash in my experience.

Slasher
1st Mar 2013, 18:25
No rgb that is pieces of arse - but very NICE pieces of arse! :)


This is a fanny. How many times do I have to tell ya! :}

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSYHlidRmMz9gzUYP7mG6uvLXTP4WxUuuKg1DPHWzs rt5WEOtJF

Thus those nice pieces of arse of yours may or may not have nice tight fannies.

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 18:32
Yes Slasher i know that's a nice arse. But the child of the mother who owns that arse might call it "Mommy's fanny."

Or are you going to insist that in Britain - and its remaining colonies - that same child would say "That's Mummy's arse"?

See, here's another picture of "mommy's fanny".

http://giraffopia.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/huge-ass.jpg

Capice?

Slasher
1st Mar 2013, 18:39
Ok mate - as said I reckon wars have started over misunderstandings like
this. How about we agree to disagree....after all we can still appreciate a
fanny of the same woman! :E

http://media1.break.com/dnet/media/2012/10/1/ddf21b24-fd3f-413e-ad91-760a63bbc70e.jpg

El Grifo
1st Mar 2013, 18:40
Was gonna say "awsome", but thats the general description for a friggin lowley piece of crap burger stateside is it not :ugh:

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 18:49
El Grifo:

"Awesome" is a word used excessively and obnoxiously, by the youth of the U.S., to describe basically anything. It goes hand-in-hand with that other often-bandied word, "Like".

"Like, I was at Jill's house and, like, she had this awesome goldfish and it was like really hungry. And she fed the goldfish this awesome food and it was, like, really grateful. it was, like, awesome. And then we played this awesome card game and it was like she had all her cards in hand and was able, to like, play them in an awesome way, like."

Slasher:

That last piccie is a "boner". Like awesome, man!!!

El Grifo
1st Mar 2013, 18:53
Awesome rgbrock !!!!! :}

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 18:53
El Grifo:

I knew you'd like it, like. But like it or not, it's liked. :}

Slasher
1st Mar 2013, 18:56
Yeh but...like did Jill have awesome tits? Like you didn't say, but it would be
awesome if you like said they were big.

rgbrock1
1st Mar 2013, 19:03
This is, like, Jill (sort of) Isn't she awesome, like?

http://cageradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/41rtqa58761w8ful.D.0.nice-tits-in-bathingsuit.jpg

Matari
1st Mar 2013, 20:31
Leave it to Slasher to thrust his way into this language discussion, and insert some hard, biting examples of pointed verbosity.

con-pilot
1st Mar 2013, 20:40
Leave it to Slasher to thrust his way into this language discussion, and insert some hard, biting examples of pointed verbosity.

And God bless him for it. :ok:

radeng
1st Mar 2013, 20:43
I once had problems with a US Sales VP (Visible Pr*ck)

He objected to a technical document atating that a radio channel access mechanism must be 'non-promiscuous, non-aggressive and non-premptive'.

He didn't like 'promiscuous', meaning 'non-organised'.

He also objected to the description of an area in which a transmission prevented the reception of other transmissions as a 'sterilisation area'.

He was by no means a wan*er - he did not have the necessary co-ordination. Fortunately, he got over-ruled....Last heard of, he was selling used cars in California. About his level of competence....

lomapaseo
1st Mar 2013, 21:11
I once had problems with a US Sales VP (Visible Pr*ck)

He objected to a technical document atating that a radio channel access mechanism must be 'non-promiscuous, non-aggressive and non-premptive'.

He didn't like 'promiscuous', meaning 'non-organised'.

He also objected to the description of an area in which a transmission prevented the reception of other transmissions as a 'sterilisation area'.

He was by no means a wan*er - he did not have the necessary co-ordination. Fortunately, he got over-ruled....Last heard of, he was selling used cars in California. About his level of competence..

could somebody translate this into american slang so I can understand it

JWP1938
1st Mar 2013, 21:59
I remember an old American film where the hero says to the girl "What say we hit the road, grab a hamburger, take in a show and then sink a few." I suppose he meant go out, have a meal and then on to the theatre followed by drinks.

Ascend Charlie
1st Mar 2013, 23:50
You don't spell it as "awesome",

it's, like, "ossom". Like.

parabellum
2nd Mar 2013, 00:12
Can't say I've heard that word here for that reason. I've heard it used for 'I'm
going to smash your face.' 'I'm going to smash it.' meaning a
physical object.

Then there is getting smashed which is another kind of accident! ;)

Matari
2nd Mar 2013, 00:25
Radeng,

Hmmm, was that American bloke really so unreasonable in his rejection of 'non-promiscuous'?

Here's what the OED says is the definition of 'promiscuous':

adjective
1. having or characterized by many transient sexual relationships:
she’s a wild, promiscuous, good-time girl
promiscuous behaviour
2. demonstrating or implying an unselective approach; indiscriminate or casual:
the city fathers were promiscuous with their honours
consisting of a wide range of different things:
Americans are free to choose from a promiscuous array of values

If I were reading that technical manual, I would not have know what 'non-promiscuous, non-aggressive and non-preemptive' meant in relation to a radio access mechanism. We cursed many a technical manual because clarity was sacrificed for someone's idea of sophisticated prose.

Davaar
2nd Mar 2013, 00:36
rgbrock: OmyGawd! Like it comes up multiple times, y'know, in every exchange, y'know. It's as simple as that.

P.S. I didn't read all that goes before: did anyone explain "slam dunk"?

So far as I am aware, although you may be sure I have never tried it, "slam dunk" describes that event of almost unbearable amusement that consists in having a willing victim at some charity occasion sit on a wooden seat feet above a large water tank, said seat connected to a lever-mechanism actuated by throwing balls or whatever, for money, at a target. The welll aimed and strongly thrown ball, having hit the target, releases the seat and the sitter tumbles into the water. A real knee-slapper.

OmyGawd! Awesome! Like I mean ya gotta laugh. I have, perforce, seen it multiple times, such is its obligatory grip, y'know, on the amusement public. Tell ya! Weird or what?

P.S.#2. I fear, Skasher, Old Man, that the others win in the matter of the "fanny". Just my opinion, mind you, but this is one study, like so many, in which the legal education is of truly -- Oh! Why not? -- awesome value. I have in mind that fabled precedent in the English Cours system from two centuries agone, "The Hottentot Venus", one Saartje Baartman, as I recall, clandestinely inveigled from the Cape of Good Hope to the English showgurl circuit, famed, as the judge put it with great delicacay, for "the formation of her person".

As Casey Stengal might have put it: "Ya can look it up!"

seacue
2nd Mar 2013, 01:40
As someone with time spent in radio communication and multiple access local networking technology like the original Ethernet

radio channel access mechanism must be 'non-promiscuous, non-aggressive and non-premptive'.

seem like the normal way of describing the channel access characteristics. Maybe they are jargon of that narrow corner of technology, but would be understood by most workers in that field.

hellsbrink
2nd Mar 2013, 05:12
Hey Slasher,
That reminded me of the Aussie v's English meaning for spunk...........The Aussie meaning will cause a load of the English meaning.

Or the look of astonishment that used to be seen on the face of an Englishman after asking for a pack of Durex in Australia........

probes
2nd Mar 2013, 06:30
You don't spell it as "awesome",it's, like, "ossom". Like.
:ok: Well, but that's a nice, kind and generous step towards normal languages that do not puzzle people with their secret spelling code - like Latin or Spanish (to a certain extent, b-s and v-s excluded). :E

ExXB
2nd Mar 2013, 06:43
If I heard "What say we hit the road, grab a hamburger, take in a show and then sink a few." that would mean they would end up at the pool hall and play a game. Wouldn't be billiards though ...

radeng
2nd Mar 2013, 10:28
Exactly, seacue.

A technical report intended for a specific technical audience. Too technical for the sales VP, though.

radeng
2nd Mar 2013, 10:31
Another set of terms that do not cross the pond....


In the days of steam trains, night shift cleaners had the duty of 'call boy'. That involved going round to the houses of drivers and firemen and 'knocking them up' (i.e.knocking on the door to wake them up) so they wouldn't be late reporting for duty.....

probes
2nd Mar 2013, 11:24
:) I used to sing in a students' choir, and when on the way to a song festival, a group from the fellow male choir went through the special train, making terrible noise and announcing: "It's midnight. Too early to wake up! Sleep sound and sweet dreams!"

Davaar
2nd Mar 2013, 12:20
Right on, radeng. In fact I have read of these lads sub nomen "knockers-up".

G-CPTN
2nd Mar 2013, 12:49
Knocker-uppers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knocker-up).

603DX
2nd Mar 2013, 12:55
Another British job title likely to be misunderstood or met with blank incomprehension in the US is "saggar maker's bottom knocker". This was one of the few occupations which beat the panel in the venerable TV game "What's My Line?"

Saggar makers bottom knockers (http://www.thepotteries.org/bottle_kiln/saggar.htm)

arcniz
2nd Mar 2013, 14:16
'non-promiscuous, non-aggressive and non-premptive'

.... more or less summarizes Mrs. Arcniz's position statement somewhere early in our acquaintance. No mincer of words, she.

tony draper
2nd Mar 2013, 14:49
No they carried a long pole and knocked n the bedroom window.:)
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/images-2_zps35187425.jpg

Davaar
2nd Mar 2013, 14:49
Knocker-uppers.

You think so, cld chap? So where do you stand on "heirs portioner". Do you go for "heir portioners"? Really?

The plurality is a quality of the "knocker", as of the "heir", and not of the functions "up" or "portion". The knockers and the heirs may be without number as the sands of the sea, but their function is unchanged and unitary.

Do you, should occasion arise, say "The Misses Smith" or the, umm, slovenly, "The Miss Smiths"?

Davaar
2nd Mar 2013, 15:04
saggar maker bottom knockers

I'd never heard of them.

I confess my first thought was of the analogous "pickle-slicer" in that old joke I heard, I remember the occasion well, in 1957. You must all know it, the one about the poor chap who was long out of work; at last found a job in a canning factory; put his thing, after temptation, in the pickle-slicer; and for that was fired (not as in "saggared", but as in dismisssed).

Shock! Horror!

But what happened to the pickle-slicer?

Oh! She got fired too.

Yuk! Yuk!

So it was at the time. Those of us who, like the youthful Davaar, had worked in a canning factory found in it an added, aaah, piquancy.

G-CPTN
2nd Mar 2013, 15:50
The plurality is a quality of the "knocker", as of the "heir", and not of the functions "up" or "portion".
The hyphen associates the up with the knocker, Shirley?

Mac the Knife
2nd Mar 2013, 15:59
http://www.newzimbabwe.com/news/images/news_bpolice-butt250.jpg

Mac

:ok:

pigboat
2nd Mar 2013, 16:36
The Tartan Gannet would be impressed! :ok:

Matari
2nd Mar 2013, 18:11
radio channel access mechanism must be 'non-promiscuous, non-aggressive and non-premptive'.

Well I'll be darned, radeng and seacue. So these are terms that a radiohead would understand?

I did recognize them as words a Sales VP would put on an expense account to justify a night out with customers at the 'Treasures Gentlemen's Club', with a $300 bottle of champagne and various entertainment activities....but a radio access panel?

Davaar
2nd Mar 2013, 20:09
Shirley?

Oh Shirley-Birley! with or without hyphen, determinative or indeterminative.

It is not a matter on which I am about to lose sleep. I did it my way which you kindly corrected. I'll leave mine my way, and you can correct my every idiom as you choose. I do not know what determinative effect you see given to the hyphen by "associate". The substance was what I addressed, as in "Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty", not "Lord Commissioner of the Admiralties".

radeng
2nd Mar 2013, 21:09
Matari,

Only terminology that a COMPETENT radio engineer would understand!

There's a lot of one may call jargon. For example, the 'Third Order Intermodulation Intercept Point' - '3IP' - is a very important concept in many areas of radio engineering. But if you were to explain it on every occasion in a technical forum, it would be a waste of time. This is the problem with technology......jargon ends up as form of short hand.

Doubtless the same in aviation. But IF you work in the field, you need to understand it.

In my case, the wan*er was too thick for the industry he had got into!

The American engineers felt the same way about him, too!

(wan*er = US 'jerk off')

Sunnyjohn
16th Mar 2013, 16:09
As always, the thread has wandered a bit. However, no-one yet has come up with an answer as to why US English uses more aggressive verbs in everyday speech that in the UK. I'm sure there's a PhD in it somewhere.

Tinstaafl
16th Mar 2013, 17:29
It seems verbs have lost their ability to act. Without assistance, anyway, so now 'up' is a mandatory inclusion

From cooking shows: Cook up, slice up, chop up, fry up, bake up, mix up, stir up, boil up, serve up - even 'reduce up'.

From construction/handy man shows: Spread up, lay up, nail up, sand up, demo up (demo=demolition), glue up, mount up, paint up.

Those are just from a few TV programs I watched** recently but 'up' has become ubiquitous in US speech.



**Or perhaps '...I watched up...'?

Sunnyjohn
16th Mar 2013, 21:25
It's strange isn't it. There seems to be a great desire to add or write more than is necessary. So, instead of bathrooms, we have bathroom solutions. An IT company here is called IT Management Solutions. What's with all these solutions? When I worked for our local Further Education College, I put forward, as a joke, the renaming of it as 'Tertiary Establishment of Ongoing Educational Solutions' and at least one person thought I was serious.

BenThere
16th Mar 2013, 23:31
When I first introduced my Aussie girlfriend at a party about 20 years ago, my friend came up to her and said, "Hi. I'm Randy."

My wife replied, "Good onya, Mate."

con-pilot
16th Mar 2013, 23:45
When I first introduced my Aussie girlfriend at a party about 20 years ago, my friend came up to her and said, "Hi. I'm Randy."

My wife replied, "Good onya, Mate."

Now that's funny. :ok:

radeng
16th Mar 2013, 23:50
fairly common in the US 'let's get our sh*t together' or similar. In the UK, this would not be considered generally as an acceptable term in even semi - polite company.

Matari
16th Mar 2013, 23:53
fairly common in the US 'let's get our sh*t together' or similar. In the UK, this would not be considered generally as an acceptable term in even semi - polite company.

But '[email protected]' and 'tosser' seem to be. Hmmm.

Milo Minderbinder
16th Mar 2013, 23:55
oft repeated tale, but I nearly choked on my beer the first time a girl came up to me in a hotel bar in Columbia SC and asked me if I "wanted a shag".
She was a right fuggly and a series of horrors flashed through my mind
It was only later that someone explained what she wanted......
Even then she would still have been too ugly

Matari
16th Mar 2013, 23:58
I have no idea what the S. Carolina girl was asking you. Can you explain?

radeng
17th Mar 2013, 00:03
Matari

'shag' = 'f*ck'.


Except about 100 years ago, when an 'ounce of shag' would have been a fairly coarse and strong pipe tobacco.

Matari
17th Mar 2013, 00:09
Well, no, not in the context of Milo's post.

As an Englishman (I presume), Milo quite rightly thought the fugly girl was asking for a quick romp in the sack. But as a southern US lady, she would not recognize the term 'shag' as such.

I'm trying to figure out what she was asking Milo for, since 'shag' in any form is not very common usage in the states.

Milo Minderbinder
17th Mar 2013, 00:47
Carolina shag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_shag)

brickhistory
17th Mar 2013, 01:02
Ah, the Carolina shag. A slower, more genteel (not gentile as I initially wrote) way to jitterbug/jive with a member of the opposite sex (at least for me).

Remember, it's usually hot and very humid, so it's gonna be slower.

And usually better...:E

Matari
17th Mar 2013, 01:44
Thanks Milo, I learned something.

Now, I guess the Cotton Eye'd Joe can only mean one thing...

Crabman
18th Mar 2013, 17:40
oft repeated tale, "I nearly choked on my beer the first time a girl came up to me in a hotel bar in Columbia SC and asked me if I "wanted a shag".I too was confused by what an American would mean by "shag". I thought that, given the part of the country, perhaps she thought you were her brother.

Tankertrashnav
18th Mar 2013, 23:39
Milo - thanks for the link - made me giggle all the way though with its totally stoney faced references to shag, shagging and best of "shaggers" (those who shag, of course!)

Just thought - if they slipped while shagging they could easily fall on their fannies ;)

brickhistory
18th Mar 2013, 23:55
Gentlemen, if you were any good at the Carolina version, it wasn't unheard to experience the British version. :E*










* not by me, of course. But so I've heard...