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View Full Version : Great Train robber Reynolds is dead


rotornut
28th Feb 2013, 14:50
BBC News - Great Train Robber Bruce Reynolds dies aged 81 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21617926)

Lon More
28th Feb 2013, 18:51
Sentenced to 25 years imprisonment was a bit harsh. Had he been a city trader now all he'd get would be his knuckles rapped

tony draper
28th Feb 2013, 18:59
Knuckles rapped Mr More? I don't think they were treated that harshly.:rolleyes:

Mr Chips
28th Feb 2013, 20:16
Career criminal, who only served 10 years and had run from justice has died. Couldn't care less. Are we so caught up with "celebrity"?

AlpineSkier
28th Feb 2013, 20:24
Any dead thief is a good thief. Preferably just a little bit after the theft. This was about 50 years too late.

Lon More
28th Feb 2013, 21:19
about 50 years too late

As the crime wasn't committed until August 1963 are you suggesting he should have been punished beforehand?

tony draper
28th Feb 2013, 21:39
The punishment had to be harsh due to the amount they stole,it was near enough to pay a City Banker his bonus.
:rolleyes:

racedo
28th Feb 2013, 21:43
If they hadn't hit the driver so badly I think it would be seen as a great robbery, he died a year later which tempers the famousness of it.

parabellum
28th Feb 2013, 22:01
In the obituary I read in the online Daily Telegraph they mention all the major players in the robbery except Ronald Biggs, (should that be Briggs?), wonder if there is a particular reason for that?

G-CPTN
28th Feb 2013, 22:32
Ronnie Biggs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronnie_Biggs) is still at large.

G-CPTN
28th Feb 2013, 22:45
From the Telegraph:- Mr Mills was assaulted in the course of the robbery and died seven years later, aged 64.
Although the primary cause of death was leukaemia, his family have always insisted that he never recovered from the ordeal,
Mr Mills received £250 in compensation and never fully returned to work, retiring aged 62.

SilsoeSid
28th Feb 2013, 22:50
Great Train Robber solves 49-year-old mystery with deathbed confession he injured engine driver in 1963 attack (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2232668/Great-Train-Robber-solves-49-year-old-mystery-deathbed-confession-injured-engine-driver-1963-attack.html)

For 49 years it has been an enduring mystery of the Great Train Robbery: Who coshed engine driver Jack Mills?
Now one of the crooks involved in the heist is said to have made a deathbed confession that he did it.
James ‘Big Jim’ Hussey reportedly admitted the crime just moments before dying, anxious that he should not take the secret to his grave.

SilsoeSid
28th Feb 2013, 22:56
Ronnie Biggs is still at large.


Is that the same as 'released from prison in 2009 on compassionate grounds, 2 days before his 80th birthday'?

AlpineSkier
28th Feb 2013, 23:04
@Lon More

Would you like to explain the exact time difference you appear to see ?

about 50 years too late ##


crime wasn't committed until August 1963 are you suggesting he should have been punished beforehand?

Seems pretty much like " about 50 years " to me . What is your personal "tolerance on " about " over 50 years ? Do you care to tell us ?

gunbus
28th Feb 2013, 23:42
My take on the great train robbery for what it's worth is that the gang turned the tables ie they robbed the government as opposed to the government robbing them

Flap 5
1st Mar 2013, 06:54
My take on the great train robbery for what it's worth is that the gang turned the tables ie they robbed the government as opposed to the government robbing them

So they robbed the tax payer. That is most of everyone else in the country. I hope they appreciate your nuance.

radeng
1st Mar 2013, 08:28
I'm with Alpine Skier on this.

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2013, 10:03
Few of the robbers managed to fully 'enjoy' their share of what was a fortune (said to be worth £40 million in today's money), though there are at least two who were never convicted:-

They believe Smith – who died in 2008 – spent his money from the raid on buying, through associates, "32 houses (including a row of 11), a drinking club and a hotel in the Portsmouth and Gosport districts". The second individual on the list who was never charged – even though police concluded he was "strongly suspected" – is still alive.
The files also lend credence to theories that the original gang included a high ranking Post Office official who passed on details via an intermediary.
A total of 17 people faced trial for the robbery, but it is thought there were four other men who helped rob the train, as well as several more who assisted in the organisation, who were never prosecuted.
From:- Great Train Robbers 'planned second Royal Mail rail heist' - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/9782838/Great-Train-Robbers-planned-second-Royal-Mail-rail-heist.html)

tony draper
1st Mar 2013, 10:45
There is also a long standing rumor that a certain well known security company was allegedly set up with money from that robbery.:E

Mr Chips
1st Mar 2013, 12:15
My take on the great train robbery for what it's worth is that the gang turned the tables ie they robbed the government as opposed to the government robbing them

Wasn't "the Government" that got coshed or terrified during the raid.

Is it ok, by your reasoning, to stick a gun in a bank cashiers face?

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2013, 12:48
Gang membership can ruin your life (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2139945/Brinks-Mat-An-ex-cop-axe-head--Great-Train-Robber-shot-dead-Marbella.html).

Tankertrashnav
1st Mar 2013, 13:07
I'm with those on this forum who wont be shedding any tears.

While we are at it, could the media be persuaded to drop the word 'heist' when describing large scale robberies. The word implies a glamorous world with Steve MacQueen planning an elegantly executed theft whereas the reality will involve terrified security guards being threatened with sawn off shotguns and possibly getting coshed.

Nothing glamorous about violent crime, and comparisons with bankers bonuses dont make it any more justifiable.

Alloa Akbar
1st Mar 2013, 13:14
Thieving criminal knobhead.. Good riddance.

Lon More
1st Mar 2013, 13:43
Alpine Skier considering the time before capture, conviction and sentencing, yes your remark was incorrect.

Dr Jekyll
1st Mar 2013, 15:33
If they hadn't hit the driver so badly I think it would be seen as a great robbery, he died a year later which tempers the famousness of it.

Six years later.