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Greek God
19th Feb 2013, 20:04
Little Rant!
Just come back from a couple of days in London - it's been a while but everywhere we went for an evening meal we now found a 12.5% Discretionary Service charge being added to the bill automatically, plus the occasional table cover. This was always calculated on the total, now I know I'm a tight git but i object to being charged a service charge on the cover plus 20%VAT?
I always decline and leave the tip in cash as I don't trust many places to give the full amount to the staff!
The place has become scarily expensive:uhoh:

toffeez
19th Feb 2013, 20:11
In Europe & UK, I only ever pay the minimum, and by card. No cash. No tip.

Some places try to intimidate the clients, which in my opinion is not good business practice.

If you plan to go back soon, maybe you want to add something.
.

gingernut
19th Feb 2013, 21:27
the 20% VAT is not the waiters fault, but I'd agree, making the assumption you'll just pay the service charge is a little out of order. Up North, we have revolted.

Whether or not you decide to just settle, or pay cash, the people who you wish to reward still get taxed. :)

BenThere
19th Feb 2013, 21:45
The people who wait our tables, clean our hotel rooms, shine our shoes, and such, work hard for their living. Appreciate them and and help to make sure they are compensated.

Big Tudor
19th Feb 2013, 22:04
The people who wait our tables, clean our hotel rooms, shine our shoes, and such, work hard for their living. Appreciate them and and help to make sure they are compensated.

Don't think anyone would argue with your comments, but the issue here is the matter of the tip a) being added to the bill in a suspiciously underhand way and b) being calculated for the customer. Who decides it should be 12.5%? And is there any guarantee the gratuity will be passed onto the staff when it is added to the bill like this?

Interestingly I listened to Giles Coren on Radio2 this evening. His opinion is that you are not tipping for the service you have just received, but rather for the service you wish to receive on your next visit. He suggested tipping well (£10 was the amount quoted) and then return soon.

Rail Engineer
19th Feb 2013, 22:09
A waiter once told me that in the case of his establishment, not one penny of the service charge went to the staff.

As far as I am concerned service comes as part of the cost of the meal, and is in any case still legally unenforceable - in other words you can simply strike it out.

He also gave me to understand that legally as long as you make a fair offer to pay, you can object to paying the full cost of the meal if you feel it was not good enough. Maybe someone can confirm ?

BenThere
19th Feb 2013, 22:14
Tipping customs vary from culture to culture. That's why I put it the way I did. Just make sure you pay fairly for services received.

gingernut
19th Feb 2013, 22:18
Interestingly I listened to Giles Coren on Radio2 this evening. His opinion is that you are not tipping for the service you have just received, but rather for the service you wish to receive on your next visit. He suggested tipping well (10 was the amount quoted) and then return soon

Giles Coren is exactly the sort of **** that should stay down south.

500N
19th Feb 2013, 22:29
That is how I understood it as well, same reason no tips here in Aus.

Although that seems to be changing.

anotherthing
19th Feb 2013, 22:39
Ben There

I believe (certainly in the past) that wage structures were different in the USA compared to say UK.

Waiting staff etc in the USA were paid really low wages, and needed the tips to take home a pay they could survive on. In the UK, although wages are low in the industry, they are not below survivability levels.

Whirlygig
19th Feb 2013, 22:47
If a 12.5% service charge is added to a restaurant bill, 2.08% of that is VAT (sales tax to my US cousins) payable to the Guvernmint.

So if a restaurant bill comes to 120 and 12.5% service is added, (and you can be sure that the 12.5% is added onto the gross amount including VAT) the amount payable in tax is 22.50 ... 20 for the meal and 2.50 for the tip ... so having paid 15 in tip, the waiting staff will only get 12.5 of that.

I have no objection to paying for good service but tips and gratuities have their own tax rules and VAT ain't one of them so please feel free to knock it off the bill and pay it in cash on the pre-VAT amount.

Personally, I would rather go to a restaurant that pays its staff a proper wage and if I have received exceptionally good service, I will pass a tenner to the waiter in his/her grubby little mitt and no need for it to pass through the books and records of the business.

Cheers

Whirls

FullOppositeRudder
19th Feb 2013, 22:50
In Australia tipping is just not done. Your employer pays you to do your job, your financial contract is with him/her - nothing to do with the end consumer.

It's a real worry when one travels overseas where it is demanded. Especially when you are on a tour where tipping and 'gratuities' are included in the overall price paid and yet there is still an outstretched hand waiting for you at every turn.

On a tour in Canada some years ago we were told that Australians and Kiwis 'just don't get it'. He was right - we don't and we probably never will. But he harped on about it for most of the trip. Once again despite all gratuities being included in the tour cost we were still subjected to double dipping in a few instances. Ill feelings resulted in both parties.

On a tour in Europe last year where once again "extras" were included, we found that they really were. It wasn't an issue anywhere, and so we did contribute spontaneously to those guides who were especially helpful.

But not at home. Which is one reason why we often prefer to explore our own country, and the two beautiful islands just off the south east coast.

con-pilot
19th Feb 2013, 23:29
In upper scale restaurants in the US, a good waiter can earn a very good salary. In the restaurant we had a financial interest in, it was not unusual for the wait staff to make over to 500.00 dollars a night each in tips average on weekends. Monday though Thursday the average was closer to $300.00 a night.

In most restaurants, if you put a tip on a credit card, it is pooled to be shared with the kitchen staff, including the dishwashers. It is completely low class and unacceptable if a owner shares in the tip. There is no law against it, but very unacceptable in the restaurant industry in the US, this includes the general manager of the restaurant. As the manager usually receives a percent of the overall profits. In our restaurant all employees received a percent of the net profits. From the General Manager down to the dishwasher.

So if one really wants to show appreciation of an excellent meal and service. Put a tip on the credit card and leave additional cash for your wait person.

G-CPTN
19th Feb 2013, 23:37
Tips given to my hairdresser are put into a communal pot.

Matari
19th Feb 2013, 23:41
In our neighborhood the pizza joint, chinese restaurant, ice cream parlor, etc. are all staffed by local high school kids (including at one time, my children).

The customers get a good meal at a decent price, the family-owned businesses make a fair profit, and the young waiters/waitresses make some nice spending money from tips.

The kids learn at a young age how to go to work, deal with customers, and earn a living.

Works for everybody here. Not sure what the big whoop is.

BenThere
19th Feb 2013, 23:45
Anyone have a problem, though, with the idea that cash tips don't get taxed like wage-earners do? Do Con-pilot's waiters pay taxes on the $300-500 take? No, they don't.

My wife's in a cash business, too - hair stylist. She gets paid in cash. While I insist she keeps her books and pays her taxes, half the stylists she works with don't even file a tax return. There are a lot of cash occupations that aren't paying their 'fair share'.

500N
19th Feb 2013, 23:45
Some kids don't think like that or McDonalds as anything
other than a crap job.

The other thing is now, some kids don't want to get a
part time job, it amazes me.

James 1077
19th Feb 2013, 23:52
Over here nobody tips anybody anything. Customer service is excellent (when compared to the UK - not sure about US as I refuse to pay for visas so won't go until they remove the ESTA cost).

The staff are working for the establishment so, if there were a problem, you can simply inform their manager and a normal employment process would be followed.

Most importantly the price you see is the price you pay - so you know beforehand how much it is going to cost you. And no worrying about how much to tip for service as the answer is always nothing.

BenThere
19th Feb 2013, 23:59
Is that one reason why New Zealand is considered prohibitively expensive these days?

I do like the idea of no tipping, and no expected tips. Our rate used to be 15% and has creeped up to 20%. But food is cheap, and the portions are huge. Life is good.

lomapaseo
20th Feb 2013, 00:37
The people who wait our tables, clean our hotel rooms, shine our shoes, and such, work hard for their living. Appreciate them and and help to make sure they are compensated.


What about bus drivers, pilots, FA's, concubines etc. ?. Where is the standard and why?

BTW, I never hesitate to give my pilot a tip after a soft landing, it's just that I have high standards about "soft"

Ozzy
20th Feb 2013, 02:13
I tip here in the US. But based on the sum BEFORE the tax is added. When back in the UK I refuse to tip, the cost of food is outrageous enough.

Ozzy

lomapaseo
20th Feb 2013, 02:19
When back in the UK I refuse to tip, the cost of food is outrageous enough.



That's because they are too fussy about their beef. Over here we don't pay much mind to a horse hoof or two in our burgers or angry cows in the chute at a slaughter house

Tolsti
20th Feb 2013, 02:36
Here in Thailand I generally tip 10% unless the service has been appalling (all too often, unfortunately) whether it be in a restaurant or a beer bar. Generally the tips go into one pot and are divided weekly.

I have no problems with tipping but only when merited. The US custom of 'having to tip' doesn't float with me. If their restaurants can't employ people at a decent wage then they shouldn't even be open.

In 1994 I flew to HK via Seoul from Vladivostok. This required a night lay over in Seoul (Courtesy of Korean as I was flying in Biz) and after dinner went into the hotel bar for a couple of beers. There was a sign in the bar reminding guests that the Korean Government had banned tipping of staff as an initiative to help the tourist industry. Indeed the staff in the hotel, from barman to waiter to Bell refused all offers of a tip.

Metro man
20th Feb 2013, 06:14
You're lucky you're only being stiffed for 12.5%, USA 15% minimum expected, 20% if doing the job properly. Unfortunately waiters in the US get taxed on the basis that they are tipped so if you don't they are out of pocket. Tipping has gone mad over there, you are expected to tip a courtesy bus driver for putting your bag onboard

I'm sure the waiter would prefer 10% cash in hand, however some places pool tips and distribute them to everyone

I went on a cruise recently, tips were automatically added to the bill in advance, however an envelope was left in the cabin if we wanted to reward exceptional service.:confused:

Captivep
20th Feb 2013, 09:58
A tip about tips on Cruises...

It is standard practice on most cruise lines to add a daily gratuity (per passenger) to your onboard account. Invariably, there is an envelope left in your cabin too.

The cruise line will tell you that gratuities are shared amongst all the staff who have looked after you (including your cabin steward, galley staff and laundry staff) and so there's an attempt to guilt you into paying it.

Having been on many cruises, I decided that I've paid enough gratuities and so, a couple of days before the end of the cruise, I go to reception and tell them I want to make my own arrangements to tip my cabin steward (not that I ever do, any more); sadly, there's nothing I can do about the 15% they add to every drink!

Before anybody thinks I'm terribly hard-hearted let me tell you the other reason I don't feel guilty about it:

The contracts these staff are on guarantee them a level of income, made up of a salary and the expected level of tips. If I don't pay the tips, then the company has to make up the money to the agreed level.

toffeez
20th Feb 2013, 10:43
I've seen in a serious guide that "in the USA, tipping is not optional".

What does that mean, please?

radeng
20th Feb 2013, 10:57
In the US, I put the tip on credit card. In the UK, I tip in cash. It's up to the waiter how it gets split with the other staff, and whether or not he declares it for tax. If it goes on the credit card, you are pay VAT on the tip - and the blasted goverment has added NO value to my meal!

UniFoxOs
20th Feb 2013, 11:29
Over here nobody tips anybody anything. Customer service is excellent (when compared to the UK - not sure about US as I refuse to pay for visas so won't go until they remove the ESTA cost).

Good point, James, especially since you let the Septics into NZ for free. We (who used to own the bl00dy country) appear to have to pay 85 for a visa to NZ. I'm now thinking of changing our proposed next year's NZ holiday to Oz.

UFO

B Fraser
20th Feb 2013, 11:30
I was in the USA a while back and wanted to take a taxi from the hotel. There was a queue of people waiting for taxis at the door of the hotel and a queue of taxis down the road waiting for their passengers. A vulgar little man controlled the flow of taxis by waving them in one at a time whereupon he would open the door of the taxi, collect a tip from the passangers and deposit it visibly in his jacket pocket for all to see. Once that car was on it's way, the next one would be summoned forward. This slowed the whole operation to a crawl and I noted that he was making more money in an hour than a surgeon. He was also probably paying a lot less in tax.

Needless to say, the annoying little git was less than happy when I ignored his repeated wishes that I have a pleasant evening. The taxi driver thought it was hilarious as this practice slowed the rate at which he could earn. I gave him a generous tip for providing the service that I wanted.

:ok:

Tolsti
20th Feb 2013, 12:01
So....what happens in the US when you refuse to tip on the basis that the service was crap, the food unedible and the ambiance didn't exist and they fail to provide a knife and fork for you to eat your hamburger with.


Do they call the Sherrif to run you out of town or what?

Metro man
20th Feb 2013, 12:35
I was in the USA a while back and wanted to take a taxi from the hotel.

Had you taken a taxi back to the hotel he would probably have opened the door and held his hand out for another tip.

Parasites, simple as that. I don't need or want them when I can do the same thing just as easily for myself.

Tableview
20th Feb 2013, 12:43
So....what happens in the US when you refuse to tip on the basis that the service was crap,

I did that once, near Miami, in an expensive restaurant where they had added a 15% service charge. I reduced it to 10% because the service was slow, inefficient (several orders wrongly fulfilled) and surly. First of all the waiter tried pleading with me, then telling me I was an ignorant foreigner (I means that's really going to work!) who didn't understand US customs, then he became threatening and abusive. When he walked away to call the police I clicked my fingers at him and told him to bring me a glass of water while we waited for the police to arrive.

Needless to say nothing happened.

con-pilot
20th Feb 2013, 16:04
When he walked away to call the police

If some idiot was stupid enough to call the police over a tip not being given, if the police did show up, it would have been the idiot that would have been arrested for misuse of the emergency number, not you. I would have just left or demanded to talk to the owner/manager, then left.

One does not have to leave a tip in the US, in fact, if one is included on the bill, you have the option of marking through it and deducting it from the total. This has been adjudicated in courts.

They may not be very happy with you, in fact you can count on that and I would not go back, but if the service was that bad, most likely you would not be going back anyway.

In our restaurant on rare occasions, a tip was not left, it happens. Then on the other hand we had one girl that decided that her tip was not enough, so she changed the credit card bill. Fortunately the customer caught the attempt and called the restaurant. The manager pulled the credit card bill, and sure enough it had been changed and the bimbo that had changed the tip, even used a different colour ink pen to make the change, she was fired on the spot and the customer received a free dinner on the restaurant.

This is what I use a guide to tipping in the US.

Really bad service, no tip.

Poor service, but things finally get there, 10%

Accepted normal service, but no attempt to make it great service, 15%. (This used to be 10%, but everything is going up.)

Outstanding service, 20%.

Exceptional, really great service (or it's your kid), 25% or higher. (It has been known that effect of alcohol can affect the size of the tip by quite a bit, why is a mystery to me. :\)

Octopussy2
20th Feb 2013, 16:18
For me, failing to tip where it is customary and expected is the height of bad manners. Surely the rule is simply to follow the local custom and rate?

So here I rarely tip, it's not customary, but I will for really excellent service.

In the UK, I happily tip the going rate. Same in the US, even though the rate is considerably higher than the UK.

Doing anything else when you have received decent treatment and satisfactory service is rude and dishonest. If you know a tip is customary, just factor it into the price of the meal.

Bad service? Don't tip.

Wile E. Coyote
20th Feb 2013, 17:27
Bad service? One penny. I wouldn't want the server to think I'd just forgotten to leave a tip.... :E

con-pilot
20th Feb 2013, 17:50
Bad service? One penny. I wouldn't want the server to think I'd just forgotten to leave a tip

Did that only once, the service wasn't bad, it was non-existent to atrocious. Could not get the order correct, after finally showing up as we were getting up to leave, then argued tellings us that we ordered what she brought us, then we could hear her bitching about us back in the kitchen, finally got the order right, but the food was cold when we finally received it.

We left without eating, but I did pay for the food, cash and left one penny for the tip.

Oh, by the way this was in London.


But to be fair, I've received about the same lousy service in the US a couple of times and have done the same once, but it was 10 cents, didn't have anything smaller.

Tableview
20th Feb 2013, 17:57
I remember gving a taxi driver a 1p tip after he'd deliberately taken me on a very long route from the airport to vastly inflate the fare, thinking I didn't know any better, and been bloody surly into the bargain. This was a day or so before Christmas

As I walked up the driveway to my parents' house a string of expletives followed me, reaching a crescendo as my mother (a very prim and proper lady) opened the door to hear : " .... and a f........ merry f.......... Christmas to you and all, you miserable f......... c......." Forgetting his tip would definitely not have had such a succesful outcome!

aspinwing
20th Feb 2013, 17:59
con-pilot

Why, when the price of the meal is increasing anyway should the % of the tip increase?

I usually tip in the 10 - 15 % range in North America and 10% (the norm) in South America on the pre-tax balance.

Seldom tip if there is a service charge.

toffeez
20th Feb 2013, 18:37
1) I've seen in a serious guide that "in the USA, tipping is not optional".
What does that mean, please?

And ...

2) What does the menu card price of a restaurant meal (without tip) include?

Open to everyone, especially Americans.

rgbrock1
20th Feb 2013, 18:41
1: Tipping in a restaurant here in the U.S. is ALWAYS optional.
You can tip whatever you feel comfortable with or, nothing at all. (Although if you don't tip and do return to the same restaurant the next time you order a meal it might come with a few added ingredients.)

2. the price includes the meal. That's it. It does NOT include state sales tax. Although in some restaurants will include a charge of up to 20% for a party of 10 or more patrons.

Solid Rust Twotter
20th Feb 2013, 18:44
I've been followed out of a restaurant and had a tip demanded of me when I've left a token couple of cents for extremely bad and rude service. When the reason was explained to the person, a stream of invective and abuse followed. I left it at that, but dropping them in it by calling the owner of the place (who is a friend) may have been a better move if this person made a habit of doing that kind of thing.

con-pilot
20th Feb 2013, 18:57
1) I've seen in a serious guide that "in the USA, tipping is not optional".
What does that mean, please?



As RG posted, it is 100% optional. For good service it is a US custom that has become a standard. But there is no law saying that one must tip.

Good service to me is that the order is correct, delivered timely and with a smile. In some types of restaurants there is no tipping. All you can eat restaurants, unless a wait person checks on you and brings you drinks, then a tip of a couple of dollars is fine. Fast food restaurants like McDonalds, no tipping, as you are not waited on, you stand in line, order, get your food, eat it there or leave and eat it somewhere else, no tipping. In about any type of restaurant that you go to a window to order and then get your food, if you would like to leave a dollar or two (which I do) for the person that is going to clean up your mess, fine but not really expected, if you clean up your own mess, leave nothing.

I hope that clears up some confusion.

My advice is the same I use when in other countries, I do my best to follow their customs, if tipping is standard custom, I tip, if it is not, I don't.

AlpineSkier
20th Feb 2013, 19:22
If I am in an expensive restaurant there is no way I am going to leave a percentage-based tip that would be equal to what I feel would be reasonable pay for most of the evening's work, especially if the person is looking after five or six tables ( don't remember what is usual ) .

I remember reading on a similar thread a while back which was U.S.-centric that some servers in high-end places made absolute fortunes. Whilst being a waiter is an honest, up-standing job, I don't see it being worth what you pay a plumber :ouch: or doctor whichever country you are in and whatever the norms.

con-pilot
20th Feb 2013, 19:50
AlpineSkier

Okay, that is your right. No one will force you to leave what is considered a normal tip in a US restaurant if you wish not to. As has been posted here prior, there is no law saying that you must.

Now, just what is it that Americans do in your country that is not accepted local customs and/or behavior? Do you feel upset or think that Americans are rude not to do as local customs and accepted behavior dictate?

Most people in most countries do, as such is reported here with frequency.

Just asking.

toffeez
20th Feb 2013, 19:59
Eating with the fork in the right hand.

Ordering coffee with their main meal.

Tipping in pubs.

con-pilot
20th Feb 2013, 20:07
Eating with the fork in the right hand.

Ordering coffee with their main meal.

Tipping in pubs.

Well let's see here.

Don't hold my fork in my right hand: Check.

Don't drink coffee: Check.

Tip in Pubs, never, however, I've been known to shout up a drink or two. That count?

AlpineSkier
20th Feb 2013, 20:43
Now, just what is it that Americans do in your country that is not accepted local customs and/or behavior?

Probably only leaving a full-sized tip on top of the 15% included in the bill, but that's usually uncertainty about what's already included.


Do you feel upset or think that Americans are rude not to do as local customs and accepted behavior dictate?

No. You are generally a pretty good bunch ;)

con-pilot
20th Feb 2013, 20:48
No. You are generally a pretty good bunch

Thank you, I do try my best, haven't been kicked out of a coutry yet. :ok:




Oh wait, actually there was one, but that was when I was working for the government, not my fault. :\

funfly
20th Feb 2013, 21:43
In the UK we seem to have two types of wages/salaries;

1. The salaries I read about in the Times every day, which seem pretty good to me and some of which (e.g.BBC & local government) I just cannot believe.

2. The wages often paid here in the North West (of England) which are based on the National Minimum Wage and which seem to be applied to most basis jobs including both manual and white collar. I have just finished a degree (yes at my age!) and I saw jobs being offered for graduates in the North Wales area at minimum wage.
I think that serving staff are most likely paid close to the minimum wage and it's nice to give a tip if you have good service, however my gut feeling is that they (everyone) should be paid a wage which allows them to live in dignity.

BenThere
21st Feb 2013, 01:29
(everyone) should be paid a wage which allows them to live in dignity

No, they should be paid the wage they earn.

Matari
21st Feb 2013, 02:19
I'm always amused by the arrogance of supposed sophisticated world travelers, when faced with the apparently incredibly vexing problem of tipping in US restaurants.

Re-read Octopussy's post, she gets it right.

Gordy
21st Feb 2013, 03:00
Matari.... Me too.

Con-pilot has it right too..... When I am out on contract I will often eat in the same place each night. If I get good service with a smile I always tip 20% or more. I normally sit at the bar in restaurants and get to know the bar tenders. After about a week, they "forget" to charge me for my salad or appetizer, they "forget" to charge me for desert and I tend to get the occasional free drinks, and also get given cookies they make at home etc......

I have also come in from a fire, after the kitchen has closed and if the cooks are still there---I will get fed.

Give and ye shall receive..... Pay it forward I say.....

cattletruck
21st Feb 2013, 03:18
I used to be put in this upmarket hotel where the porter would insist on taking my luggage out of the taxi to the lift (a distance of 20m) and then stick his hand out for a tip.

I found it annoying. For I was fit and could do it myself, as I used to do in my younger backpacking days trekking all over the world. But I always gave him his tip.

I changed to a downmarket hotel because of it, which for me was not an issue as I tend to spend as less time as possible being cucked up in any hotel.

One group of people I often tip is cab drivers whether it is necessary or not. When I get in a cab I always take the front seat and start a conversation. In Australia cabbies are often foreign students studying engineering at university, and the tip is very much appreciated (along with road directions :}). In Med Europe cabbies are often also the owners and every now and then (50/50) you come across someone knowledgeable and genuinely interested in your life in your home country. I once gave someone a 10 Euro tip for a 3 Euro cab fare and he refused it because he thought I was going to report him for overcharging. Eventually after much convincing that I wasn't going to report him he accepted it, and it couldn't have gone to a more deserving person.

Tipping for good work to me is a positive thing to do. But I have seen those kinds of people that are never able to be pleased and will not tip or will throw the money on the floor, which is hardly the fault of the worker.

vulcanised
21st Feb 2013, 12:09
Due to my chariot being unavailable for regular duties I had to take two identical taxi trips recently.

The first driver was very pleasant and even carried my shopping all the way to the front step, much to my surprise. He got a good tip.

The other driver had some sports station on the radio, didn't ask if I minded, got the bare fare.

(vulcanised, ex-cab driver)

Ozzy
21st Feb 2013, 14:51
Interesting comments re cabbies. I use a guy who works for himself and has one limo to take me from and to BOS Logan. I tip him 20% every trip and it is still cheaper than paying parking fees at that god forsaken place.

Last trip he told me he was retiring with a mate to Cost Rica. He is ex forces, gammy leg, good all round bloke. WTF will I do now????

Ozzy

BenThere
21st Feb 2013, 14:54
WTF will I do now????


Move to Detroit. You can park at the airport for $8/day.

Ozzy
21st Feb 2013, 15:13
Move to Detroit. You can park at the airport for $8/day.

Heh heh, as useful as a chocolate frying pan...

Ozzy

ExXB
21st Feb 2013, 15:19
Local practice is that 15% is included in the bill, as is the VAT. (No idea if tip on top of VAT or not). Everywhere does this (including McDooDoos) but nowhere posts that information. Tip is shared by all staff - waiters to scullery maids.

Local custom is to round it up to the next logical unit, but never more than a franc a person. A 2.80 coffee could be 3.00 but a 92.00 bill would never be 100.00 (unless there was 8 of you)

Damn foreigners (in particular one nationality, but not only them) don't know/understand the practice so leave tips of varying percentages. It's now becoming expected to do the same, particularly if you don't have a perfect Suisse-Romande accent.

Next time you're in Switzerland, please note: SERVICE IS INCLUDED! Don't leave more than a franc a person. Thank you!

BizJetJock
21st Feb 2013, 15:42
What I don't understand is how come when I'm in the USA it's expected that I give cash to a person to encourage them to do the job they're there to do, but if I do the same outside the USA then Uncle Sam hunts me down and extradites me for corrupt practices....:confused:

Matari
21st Feb 2013, 15:45
It's called irony. I thought ya'll got that.

Um... lifting...
21st Feb 2013, 15:48
Last trip he told me he was retiring with a mate to Cost Rica. He is ex forces, gammy leg, good all round bloke. WTF will I do now????


Ring him up so you'll know where to send his congratulatory bottle.

While getting that information, express your personal loss. One imagines he's not the only bloke doing that around greater BOS and doubtless will know some decent fellow who still is.

In a couple of cities (BOS not being one of them) I try to keep two drivers in the phone index against one of them being unavailable. Seems to work.

Ozzy
21st Feb 2013, 17:35
Cheers Um... lifting...

I am on it, I really like this guy and have always given him my business and also asked him to pick up folks coming in from Europe - and I told them how much to tip him! (original thread touch).

Ozzy

cargosales
21st Feb 2013, 22:01
I went on a business trip to the States a while back .. and got the 'complimentary' hotel shuttle bus from the airport to said hotel.

[Note to Americans: to us Brits, 'complimentary' means it's part of the overall package / built into the price and that nothing extra is payable for that service]

I had changed into US$ on the way out but only got large denomination bills ($50 IIRC)

On arrival at the hotel it was clear that the driver of the shuttle bus expected a tip simply for doing her job [which I half expected as I knew that you do things slightly differently over there] so I went to hotel reception to see if they could change a 50 for some smaller bills. As I walked in to do that [sans suitcase still in the bus] I heard several rather unsavoury remarks from said driver about how mean us Brits were......

Result ... she got nothing...

I'll happily give when I get good service but it's my right to give, not yours to expect or demand...