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Flying Lawyer
12th Feb 2013, 18:11
.......... would you most like to meet?
And why?

Michael Collins
Gemini X and Apollo 11

Buzz Aldrin
Gemini 12 and Apollo 11

Jim Lovell
Gemini 7, Gemini 12, Apollo 8 and Apollo 13.



Not just random questions.
I have a reason for asking.


FL

500N
12th Feb 2013, 18:23
Jim Lovell


Why ?

I would like to hear about the Apollo 13 mission and I have already met
Buzz Aldrin, listened to a speech / slide show and got the signed photo.
Not to say I wouldn't mind meeting him again :ok:

con-pilot
12th Feb 2013, 18:35
Already met two of them, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin.

My wife's second cousin is Thomas Stafford, Apollo 10 and two Gemini flights*. Met them first through Tom then later ran into Buzz Aldrin three or four more times.

* And the Apollo-Soyuz mission, that one slipped my mind.

Slasher
12th Feb 2013, 18:43
Jim Lovell.

He had to think outside the box and rewrite the manual on Apollo XIII (with
the aid of the NASA boffins admittedly).

Bronx
12th Feb 2013, 18:53
Con

Since you already met two of them which of those two would you say its best for someone who aint met either to meet?


And maybe Slasher's got a point about Lovell?

500N
12th Feb 2013, 19:01
Re Lovel / Apollo 13 and Slasher's point, exactly,
I think it would be really interesting to hear just
what went on, real fly by the seat of your pants
type crisis management.

charliegolf
12th Feb 2013, 19:11
Collins. Of all the bios and autobios, his was the most readable and informative.

CG

SASless
12th Feb 2013, 19:18
For sure not Armstrong....as the venue would not be one I wish to visit just yet!

For sheer fun....probably Gordon Cooper would be my choice as of the Mercury Astronauts he went the highest, fastest, and furtherest of them all as I understand it.

con-pilot
12th Feb 2013, 19:29
Since you already met two of them which of those two would you say its best for someone who aint met either to meet?


I only met Michael Collins once and he was mostly a quiet, rather unassuming type of guy, but gave you the impression that if things went to hell, you'd want him around.

As for Buzz, funny and entertaining as hell, a real fun guy, but then I've not ran into him for quite a few years. Oh, and every time I've met him, it was in a casual situation, like in a club or at a party.

tony draper
12th Feb 2013, 19:49
John Young was the longest serving Astronaut he flew all the different craft Mercury Gemini Apollo and the Shuttle,def the right stuff was John.
:ok:
I tell a lie he did not fly in the Mercury program.
John Young (astronaut) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Young_%28astronaut%29)

Ozzy
12th Feb 2013, 20:37
Jim Lovell.

Not Neil Armstrong, that would require a life changing event...

Ozzy

eastern wiseguy
12th Feb 2013, 20:55
Jim Lovell...and, if I may ,in the company of a non astronaut,Gene Krantz. That is how to run a crisis.

Halfbaked_Boy
12th Feb 2013, 20:59
Michael Collins...

I'd like to know what it felt like, being the lonely designated driver in lunar orbit while his buddies played golf below.

All joking aside, being alone in that situation must have been a surreal experience, the likes of which are unimaginable until you find yourself there doing it.

treadigraph
12th Feb 2013, 21:02
Mike Collins or Jim Lovell - it really is a tough call between them...

Agree that Collins' autobiog is superb.

tony draper
12th Feb 2013, 21:03
You know what they say, You should never meet your heroes.
:uhoh:

500N
12th Feb 2013, 21:08
"Jim Lovell...and, if I may ,in the company of a non astronaut,Gene Krantz. That is how to run a crisis."

Yes, agree.

I saw an interview with Gene Krantz, top person.

I just re read his bio, amazing man at an amazing time.

bluecode
12th Feb 2013, 21:47
Collins, Buzz is a great guy but he has given us his all
already. Jim Lovell, oh that's difficult. Can I meet them all. Please can I meet them all?

Collins the percentage thing, he's Irish and his book was brilliant.

Oh GAWD, don't make me choose.

M.Mouse
12th Feb 2013, 22:10
I'd like to know what it felt like, being the lonely designated driver in lunar orbit while his buddies played golf below.

He discusses just that in 'In the Shadow of the Moon' which is a 1st class DVD anyway! If you have the chance to watch it the 'Extras' section has another hour of footage which didn't make the final cut but contains some pretty amazing stuff as well.

I recently went to a lecture given by Charlie Duke which was very good although not quite the same as a personal conversation.

For anybody interested Al Worden who was the Command Module Pilot, Apollo 15 in 1971 is giving a talk in Pontefract, West Yorkshire, UK on March 16th.

I hope I am not breaking any rules in posting a link to get tickets for this non-profit making event: Al Worden Lecture (http://www.space-lectures.com/index.html)

dead_pan
12th Feb 2013, 22:19
Deke Slayton or John Glenn would be my choice.

I've always wanted to discuss my interest in philately with David Scott...

cattletruck
13th Feb 2013, 04:24
Buzz Aldrin

Why? I remember seeing cabin footage of him landing a jet (A4 SkyHawk I think) on a carrier deck in rough seas and seeing how really relaxed he was with aiming the hook on the wire. What I took away from that very footage as a teenager was that in highly stressful/busy situations more can be done more effectively by handling things clamly.

haughtney1
13th Feb 2013, 05:47
Slayton, Cooper, Grissom and of course Jim Lovell.
Eugene Krantz would also be good to have a beer with and shoot the proverbial :ok:

Krystal n chips
13th Feb 2013, 05:57
Any of those who took part in the development of the Shuttle programme, from the first launch, the trials and subsequent operational flights.

The first flights / trials in particular as the Shuttle was unique in so many ways, in comparison ( I use the word lightly of course ) to the previous capsule launches and recovery in other programmes.

500N
13th Feb 2013, 07:21
I read the other day that Lovell had a cameo role in the film Apollo 13
as the captain of the USS Iwo Jima, the ship that picked them up.

he was offered the role of Admiral but as he had retired a Captain
he was satisfied with that.

Fitter2
13th Feb 2013, 08:48
Difficult - I'd have to go for Lovell as the only astronaut who went to the moon twice, but never landed.

Although Mike Collins' book 'Carrying the Fire' is the best written of any of the astronauts autobiographies. My copy (on loan for the last 30 years from a NASA test pilot, I must see him to give it back) is getting a little dog-eared.

charliegolf
13th Feb 2013, 09:06
Collins was also hit with medical issues after selection (throat problems) and had to work through them. I liked that he was not the totally perfect specimen the films portrayed.

CG

B Fraser
13th Feb 2013, 20:59
Meeting any of them would be a privilege.

If Collins was Irish then Armstrong was a Scot ;)

brickhistory
13th Feb 2013, 21:09
I've met John Glenn. Of course, it was just as one in a line at a squadron event, but he was very gracious.

Almost any of them would be fascinating to listen to. But I'd like to hear about their flying prior to astronaut selection since most of their space time has been well covered.

One fascinating tangent is the women and later scientists NASA selected and sent to flight training. Of course only one, Schmitt, flew in Apollo 17.

Another fascinating tidbit is that Rick Husband, Commander of the doomed Challenger Shuttle, flew the very last military flight of the RAF's Buccaneer while at Empire Test Pilot School.

Davaar
13th Feb 2013, 23:32
Not a direct answer, I fear, but: Armstrong.

My reason tends rather to the thread drift. The other day, driving along, I caught the tail-end of a "chat" program on the car radio. It concerned the family Gorski (or Gorki).

As a lad, the story developed, young Neil lived next door to said family G. One day the boys of the neighbourhood were playing some variation of soft-ball in the street, and the ball caused, or so it was feared, minor damage chez G.

Neil was delegated to pay the collective respects, make the joint and several apologies, and if possible retrieve the ball.

When he arrived at the house, the door was wide open; but the place was not deserted. Vigorous, not to say loud, monologue was to be heard from within, directed by the unseen chatelaine to the also unseen but in his case silent high constable of the chateau.

"SEX! SEX! SEX!", said Mrs G., "YOU WANT SEX!

I'LL GIVE YOU ALL THE SEX YOU CAN HANDLE WHEN THE KID NEXT DOOR WALKS ON THE MOON!"

I'd just like to check with Mr Armstrong on any reports of a latter-day follow-up.

11Fan
14th Feb 2013, 00:42
On this subject, if you have the opportunity to watch it, Tom Hanks, Ron Howard, HBO and some others put together a great mini-series. I'm sure they took a few creative liberties but it gives you a glimpse into the lives of these guys. A lot of it was of the Apollo guys though.

From the Earth to the Moon (TV mini-series 1998 (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120570/?ref_=sr_1)

So good, I bought the DVD set.

11Fan
14th Feb 2013, 00:48
One question I would have wanted to ask Armstrong if I had the chance.

Who the hell was Manny Klein?

chuks
14th Feb 2013, 00:48
Lance Armstrong, because I want to ask if he really landed on the moon.

SASless
14th Feb 2013, 03:56
11Fan.....you really don't know who Manny Klein was and what connection he had to Neil Armstrong? Really?

11Fan
14th Feb 2013, 05:52
you really don't know who Manny Klein was and what connection he had to Neil Armstrong?

I figured he was some midget who worked at Grumman and had trouble getting down off the LM's ladder.


Davaar already did the Mr. Gorsky joke.

treadigraph
14th Feb 2013, 06:56
Was Jim Lovell CEO of an American airline at one stage?

Frank Borman was CEO of Eastern Air Lines.

mike-wsm
14th Feb 2013, 09:08
Gus Grissom

A great pioneer.

wiggy
14th Feb 2013, 09:16
John Young - just because of the CV that Drapes described.

Jim Lovell - to ask how the h**k he and Frank Borman stayed sane through the 14 days of Gemini 7.

PPRuNe Pop
14th Feb 2013, 10:51
Jim Lovell. He has an abundance of brains, balls and copious amounts of knowledge and what to do with it. When it comes to space he probably has no equal, although collectively the astronauts were in a class of their own.

But, for my money it is Jim Lovell who held things together on Aplollo X111, with his guile and just plain getting on with the job and getting them all back home.

SASless
14th Feb 2013, 10:54
Manny Klein is just another Jewish Name .....and the joke is said to have started in a Buddy Hackett routine in Vegas.

Krystal n chips
14th Feb 2013, 16:57
Just a thought.

All the answers so far have been with regard to American astronauts.

So what about those from other countries who have also flown in space...China / Russia for example.

The Russians aren't averse to talking about themselves and any of the orginal cosmonauts would, I am sure, be as interesting to meet and listen to as the Americans.

It would be interesting to learn about the Russian technology in comparison to the US at the time.

charliegolf
14th Feb 2013, 17:01
So what about those from other countries who have also flown in space...China / Russia for example.

No-one gives a sh1t about them?

CG

con-pilot
14th Feb 2013, 17:13
It would be interesting to learn about the Russian technology in comparison to the US at the time.

From my conversations with Tom Stafford, the Soviet Union's space vehicles were not as advanced both in technology nor in sophistication as the US space program. To accomplish the Apollo-Soyuz mission, we (the US) had to make all of the modifications to the Apollo ship for the in space hook up and the American astronauts had to learn basic Russian for the mission to be successful. Not to mention that the Soviet Bureaucrats where a major pain in the arse.

As for the Soviet Astronauts themselves, Tom said that they were a group of great guys and that he would work/fly with them again, anytime and anywhere.

WhatsaLizad?
14th Feb 2013, 18:07
I arrived off my working flight (pilot) at LAX and was killing a couple of minutes checking my schedule on the computer. I saw an familiar looking older gentlemen sitting left of the podium. I checked the outbound pax list, and sure enough it was Wally Schirra.

I went over and introduced myself, and it was like talking to an uncle I hadn't spoke with in years. Exceptionally friendly, unassuming and 'down to earth' personality. We chatted for 25 minutes or so, mostly about the space program from Mercury and Apollo, and he spoke like a guy telling you about his pick-up truck in a parking lot. I fly through LAX alot and see legions of vain, arrogant, "don't you know who I am" celebrities. None of them compare to guys like Schirra.

Sadly, he passed on a year or two later. I still seem to learn every year of the incredible things that friendly old man accomplished.

airship
14th Feb 2013, 18:21
I quite like what chuks wrote: Lance Armstrong, because I want to ask if he really landed on the moon., though unsure of any special significance to this thread (but see below)...

What worries me is the original thread starter's admission, Flying Lawyer wrote: Not just random questions.
I have a reason for asking. :\

What does FL know (and currently hiding from the rest of us) about astronauts involved with the Apollo and/or Gemini missions that we don't? :(

Desert185
15th Feb 2013, 23:29
Michael Collins, because I enjoyed his book "Carrying The Fire" so much. One of my favorite aerospace books.

Flying Lawyer
2nd Oct 2013, 19:32
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v140/Rotorheads/Aviation/GAPANbanner_600.jpg


The Guild Award of Honour 2013

Awarded to an individual who has made an outstanding lifetime contribution to aviation.


http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/portraits/lovell-ja.jpg http://www.govivaspeakers.com/sites/default/files/speaker-photos/Capt%20Jim%20Lovell.jpg
Captain James Arthur Lovell USN

Captain Lovell will receive the Guild of Air Pilots' Award of Honour at the annual Trophies and Awards Banquet to be held in the Great Hall of London's medieval Guildhall on the 23rd October.

The Banquet will be attended by HRH Prince Andrew Duke of York, Grand Master of the Guild.
Official guests include leading figures in aviation from around the world.


Citation:


Forty four years ago pilot-explorers flew to the Moon in primitive spacecraft furnished with what is now the computing power of a child’s toy, and navigation tools that Captain Cook would have recognised. Their skill, ingenuity and courage will be remembered a thousand years from now, and in history their names will rank not only with the Wright Brothers but with Magellan and Christopher Columbus.

Captain James Arthur Lovell USN is the only man to have flown to the Moon twice, but not landed on it. His abilities as an astronaut on Apollo 8 helped pave the way for Neil Armstrong’s first step and, as Commander of Apollo 13; his coolness under pressure gave us an immortal phrase known the world over: “Houston, we have a problem.”

A US Navy night fighter pilot flying the McDonnell F2H Banshee, Captain Lovell graduated at the top of his Test Pilot course and was accepted as an astronaut for the Gemini programme. He flew as pilot on Gemini 7 when it accomplished the first-ever space rendezvous in 1965, and as Command Pilot on Gemini 12 he docked with another spacecraft manually after a rendezvous radar failed – a significant achievement in those pioneering times.

In 1968 Jim Lovell took off for the Moon in Apollo 8 with Frank Borman and Bill Anders, the first human beings to leave earth orbit. As navigator, Captain Lovell used a sextant to measure the spacecraft’s position and calculate mid- course corrections. Many indelibly remember the broadcast to the Earth from 60 miles above the Moon on Christmas Eve: “In the beginning, God created the Heaven and the Earth...”

In the case of Apollo 13, the world remembers Jim Lovell for another flight entirely. The Apollo spacecraft lifted off on April 11th 1970 to land Captain Lovell and Fred Haise on the Moon, with Jack Swigert to pilot the service module. An oxygen tank explosion two days later crippled the spacecraft 200,000 miles away from Earth, threatening to maroon the three men in space, far beyond the help of any human agency.

Through the brilliance and courage of Jim Lovell and his crew, improvising under conditions of extreme hardship and pressure, an almost certain catastrophe was averted and Apollo 13 was brought home safely, with Captain Lovell adjusting course manually by firing the lunar module’s thrusters and engine, using his watch for timing.



The Banquet is open to all Guild members and their guests.
Closing date for applications to attend: This Friday 4th October

For more information and a downloadable Application Form click the Guild badge ............... https://www.gapan.org/template/theme/gapan/img/im-guild-crest.gif (https://www.gapan.org/file/1186/application-form-for-the-trophies-and-awards-banquet.pdf)



Tudor Owen

.

tdracer
3rd Oct 2013, 03:11
Short answer to the original question - Buzz Aldrin. Roughly 40 years ago, my (late) dad met Buzz at an event for the company he worked for - my dad subsequently got a street named after him in my old home town. I was hugely jealous.

Almost exactly a year ago, the Seattle Museum of Flight had a big fund raising Gala, attended by about 40 space dignitaries - astronauts, flight directors, etc. I'm big into hobby rocketry - especially scale models of the 1960's vintage USA manned spacecraft. A couple months before the event, I was approached by our local rocket club - they were looking for someone to build a couple Space Ship One models for the Gala - they'd be signed by the SS1 pilots - one would be auctioned off, the other to go into the museum collection. One thing lead to another, and eventually I ended up building three SS1 models, and three Saturn V models (1/100, 1/72, and 1/64 scale).
The night before the Gala, I was invited to a reception for the honored guests at the Seattle Four Seasons to get the models autographed. While the SS1 model were only autographed by Brian Binnie and Vern Estes (the models I built were Estes kits), EVERYONE signed the Saturn V's, including:
Bonnie Dunbar
Ed Gibson
Jack Lousma
Jim McDivitt
John Creighton
Charles Simonyi
Walt Cunningham
Gerald Carr
Scott Parazynski
Alexei Leonov
(all Apollo, Space Shuttle, and or Soyuz Astronauts)
Gene Kranz
Sy Liebergot
Jerry Bostick
(all Apollo flight directors)
-and-
Buzz Aldrin
:ok:
Buzz Aldrin was great - cracking jokes while he autographed the models. At the end of the evening (when most people had left) I was able talk to him and ask about the idiot -claiming that the moon landings where a fraud -that Buzz punched (it's on u-tube - classic). Meanwhile, my 'wingman' - a Boeing flight instructor who had been directing the 'honored guests' to me to get the models autographed - had arranged for Gene Kranz to do a session on a 787 simulator the next day.

At the Gala the next night, I also met Jim Lovell, Fred Haise, and the last man to walk on the moon, Gene Cernan. Two of the SS1 models auctioned off for over $700 each, the 1/72 Saturn V for a cool $8,000. Due to a misunderstanding, the 1/100 Saturn wasn't auctioned - it went into the museum collection to be auctioned at a future time. The best part, I got to keep the autographed 1/64 Saturn V (it was sort of my payment for the other stuff) :ok::ok::ok:

Almost literally a dream come true:D

Simmbob
3rd Oct 2013, 10:20
As a young lad, and watching in awe the exploits of the space race, they were all heroes to me.

If I were to meet any one of them I'm afraid I would be a bit like Homer Simpson, I would have a voice in my head saying, "ask an intelligent question you moron" whilst being completely star struck. :ooh:

tony draper
3rd Oct 2013, 10:51
The original seven were the names known to most my generation,they were as famous a the beatles to us when the space race kicked off,less so as things progressed,I knew the names of all the apollo crews but the only shuttle astronaut I could name was John Young.
Now Astronauts seem to be regarded just as people with a very interesting job not celebrities.
Perhaps that's as it should be.
:)

jackieofalltrades
3rd Oct 2013, 12:12
Michael Collins...

I'd like to know what it felt like, being the lonely designated driver in lunar orbit while his buddies played golf below.

All joking aside, being alone in that situation must have been a surreal experience, the likes of which are unimaginable until you find yourself there doing it.

Of the three listed, it's Collins for pretty much the same reason. It must be such an immense mix of emotions being in orbit around the moon alone whilst his two colleagues were walking on the moon. I always felt for him never actually getting the chance to walk on the moon himself.

beaufort1
3rd Oct 2013, 12:22
As has been posted, I think they were all pioneers. I can still remember being woken up by my mother and being bundled up in a dressing gown and watching the black & white images on the TV. I think it was James Burke on the BBC introducing the moon landing live. I can recall how long it took for the actual landing, they took forever gliding over the lunar surface, to a small boy it seemed ages.:)

603DX
3rd Oct 2013, 12:44
I think it was James Burke on the BBC introducing the moon landing live.

Yes it was him, beaufort1. My eldest daughter now living in Guernsey recently surprised me by clearly recalling the experience of being woken in the early hours to witness the moon landing live on TV, when she was only three and a half. To my astonishment, she not only remembered my awe-struck statement that what we were seeing on our screen was "History in the making", but also that I had told her that I knew the BBC presenter Burke, because I was at school with him. Seems that such dramatic events register lastingly in the memory of the very young.

500N
3rd Oct 2013, 13:36
beaufort

"I can still remember being woken up by my mother and being bundled up in a dressing gown and watching the black & white images on the TV."

+ 1

That is probably the first clear recollection I have of TV and
one of the clearest as a kid.

KAG
3rd Oct 2013, 14:42
My father was working at the CNES and met a few French cosmonauts (the first one I met was Jean Loup Chretien, he was aswell the first Western Europe cosmonaut) when I was a kid. Went to Russia a few times with my father, went to Ukraine, Evpatoria inside a space control building France was using in a join space program with Russia. I remember my father told me "press here" (it was an enter touch) "you just sent the information to the satellite to retract its solar panel" he said. I guess I was impressed as a kid.
After that it went down hill in my very young life familly wise, haven't even finished school but will spare you with the details (you can thank me for that ;) ).
I made it eventually to B737 Captain and thanks god (if he exists) for that.

Heliport
26th Oct 2013, 10:04
Astronaut honoured by the Guild of Air Pilots (http://www.pprune.org/military-aircrew/524800-jim-lovell-honoured-guild-air-pilots-now-incl-photographs.html)


H.

Dr Jekyll
26th Oct 2013, 13:34
My eldest daughter now living in Guernsey recently surprised me by clearly recalling the experience of being woken in the early hours to witness the moon landing live on TV, when she was only three and a half.

My recollection was that the landing was late afternoon UK time, it was the moon walk that was early next morning.

Smudger
26th Oct 2013, 21:14
If it has to be one and one only, there can only be one candidate... John Young.

ArthurR
27th Oct 2013, 11:34
Met Klaus-Dietrich Flade a number of times, he was our test pilot on the GAF A310 MRTT. He knew how to take a joke and play one.

Klaus-Dietrich Flade - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaus-Dietrich_Flade)

Should imagine that BEagle knows him pretty well too.

haughtney1
27th Oct 2013, 11:59
Jim Lovell and Gord Cooper

Astronaut Gordon Cooper Talks About UFOs - YouTube

chksix
27th Oct 2013, 16:14
Chris Cassidy.

His is officially the "Most Awesome Bio" of the NASA astronauts :D

Read it and weep: :E
Astronaut Bio: Chris Cassidy (09/2013) (http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/cassidy-cj.html)

603DX
27th Oct 2013, 17:10
My recollection was that the landing was late afternoon UK time, it was the moon walk that was early next morning.

Yes, you are right Dr Jekyll. The actual landing was at 2019 GMT. Not surprisingly, the event which many folk remember as the classic history-making moment was the "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" statement by Neil Armstrong, at the commencement of the moon walk at 0256 GMT next day.

500N
27th Oct 2013, 17:17
Agree.

Still remember being woken up to come and watch it.