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merch
11th Feb 2013, 12:15
Hi Everyone,

Looking for a bit of advice.

Just found out Iím being made redundant in two months time, at the age of 66 I doubt if Iíll get another job here in the UK, Iím trying though. So Iím thinking of retiring to Cyprus with Mrs Merch.

Iíve been there on holiday, and really liked it, but as you know holidays and living there are totally different. Can anyone who retired there offer some advice, and point out the drawbacks; weíll probably be renting there.
Iíve got some friends out there but they view things through rose coloured specs and Cyprus is as close to Utopia as you can get, so an objective view would be welcome

As nothing is easy - I have had a kidney transplant and Iím on anti rejection tablets that are not cheap. Iíll obviously get an EHIC before I go, but the medical facilities and care for us?

Any thoughts would be really welcome Ďcos itís a big step for us.

Thanks
Merch

pzu
11th Feb 2013, 13:43
Could be 'sucking eggs' but try this site for some info (plus a lot of moans & groans)

CyprusLiving • View forum - General Discussion Area (http://www.cyprusliving.org/phpbb/nfphpbb/viewforum.php?f=1)

PZU - Out of Africa (Retired)

wings folded
11th Feb 2013, 13:48
Try to arrange a timeshare with the pope. He is retiring too.

Wodrick
11th Feb 2013, 14:17
Digging through that forum they start talking about S1 forms and Medical Cards. That would suggest to me that post retirement there is a reciprocal medical agreement such as there is here (Spain).
I have full service from the Spanish State system paid for by the British Government.

Ancient Observer
11th Feb 2013, 14:21
Get yourself up to speed with the vast range of legal issues about North and South Cyprus.
The legal differences with UK can catch you out on a range of matters.
Be careful not to cross the Russians who own much of Cyprus.
Never, ever, upset the police.
Beware the snobby Brit sets.

Lovely place.

airship
11th Feb 2013, 14:24
Be very careful merch. (Greek) Cyprus will eventually need probably X3 of the equivalent "per capita in rescue loans" already previously extended to Greece mainland. The Russian mafia have taken over the Cyprus' financial sector, and I doubt that any EU agency will rescue these "offshore EU banks" anymore.

But only provided you keep your bank account and funds in UK mainland banks etc., and have a health-care plan financed privately) why not attempt to take advantage of the maelstorm awaiting Cyprus (and probably 10X greater than what hit mainland Greece recently in the last few years...?!

The Cypriot banks are today so riddled with bad debts concerning Greece, together with representing probably Europe's no. 1 money-laundering facilities for most Russian / Ukranian / East European mafias and criminals that I would not give Cyprus a chance for an EU rescue. I just don't see the EU coming to the rescue of all these mafiosi. Perhaps Putin and Russia will come to their rescue, together with the IMF...?!

Otherwise, "as an expatriate in search of a suitable retirement place", please do not otherwise risk it all on the Cypriot government (in terms of providing heath-care) or their banks, when considering your own future requirements?!

Have you considered Madagascar...?!

merch
11th Feb 2013, 14:29
Many thanks for the replies, already providing lots of food for thought

SpringHeeledJack
11th Feb 2013, 14:52
I've never been to Cyprus, so won't relay things heard 2nd and 3rd hand, but it seems that if your condition 'might' be chronic (i hope not) then careful consideration might be needed. How would winter in Cyprus, summer in Blighty sound ? Best of both worlds and no definitive cutting of ties :ok: As you say, holiday is one thing, living quite another and we're all different in the way we deal with such a change.



SHJ

ExXB
11th Feb 2013, 16:03
SpringheeledJack.

A question. Can you be a resident (i.e. eligible for health care) of two EU countries at the same time? We've thought about having my Father-in-law come to us for extended periods (but not permanently) and health coverage has been troublesome.

As I understand it, if he remains a UK resident, he is eligible here for 'emergency care', but not regular care. (For the purposes of this question lets assume Switzerland is in the EU)

Thanks

Ancient Observer
11th Feb 2013, 16:21
airship has spelt out what I mentioned.

I have a relative who is a Greek Cypriot, and much as he tried to return home once he had made a few bob, the land that he bought was "required" by the Russians.

He kept on insisting that they should pay him for the land, and a few years later, they did, along with a warning to stay out of town.

Try asking the approx 100,000 Greek Cypriots, and the 130,000 Turkish Cypriots in the UK, why they are here, and not there.

Then, go and ask the even bigger Cypriot population in Aus.

rogerg
11th Feb 2013, 16:22
I have three colleagues who job share and spend half their life in Cyprus. They have bought properties away from the coast and in general are pretty happy. Things have deteriorated in the last few years and they try to keep their finances in the UK. The weather is great in the trodos but it can get blo--dy hot in the summer. Good luck.

SpringHeeledJack
11th Feb 2013, 18:08
A question. Can you be a resident (i.e. eligible for health care) of two EU countries at the same time? We've thought about having my Father-in-law come to us for extended periods (but not permanently) and health coverage has been troublesome.

The answer is I don't know, but it might be a grey area whereby you'd have to prove whether or not you were resident or just visiting, the how long is a piece of string conundrum. It should be open to people who have 2 residences within the EU, but you can bet your bottom dollar that there's some bureaucratic hurdles to jump over with caveats galore :rolleyes:


SHJ

merch
12th Feb 2013, 09:20
Thanks for all the replies and advice. Doesn't seem quite so attractive, summer in Blighty might be a thought.

Thanks for your time.

SpringHeeledJack
12th Feb 2013, 09:46
I, like many people, am a fan of warm weather, but if I'm honest not of hot weather especially when it goes on for too long. Cyprus and other southern European countries get hot during the summer months and if you don't fancy sweating and hiding :) for weeks at a time, then maybe the moody British summer is a good bet.


SHJ

merch
12th Feb 2013, 13:50
We have both spent many years in in the tropics travelling, also living in Dubai and Florida. So we like the heat, but the UK weather! Where each year seems to be spent hoping for a hot and long summer and being disappointed. The unpredictability of it, can't plan a braii more than a day in advance.

Just me moaning about the weather.

AlpineSkier
12th Feb 2013, 13:59
@ExXB


A question. Can you be a resident (i.e. eligible for health care) of two EU countries at the same time?

Under certain circumstances yes, but it might be a question of an individual official's interpretation and probably time-limited.

This morning I was talking to a British friend here in France and the conversation veered and he said that when his family moved to France and he was setting up a business, he was told ( by tax-office or accountant, I forget ) that for "a couple of years " it was "acceptable " to be resident in both countries whilst deciding which was to be the country of residence.

OFSO
12th Feb 2013, 15:02
a resident (i.e. eligible for health care)

These are two different things ! Too many people assume being resident encompasses all the rest - health & welfare and income tax - but it doesn't. In Spain you can be resident but not liable for income tax, or non-resident but liable for income tax. Or resident but not entitled to free health care.

So be careful.

probes
12th Feb 2013, 18:17
it can get blo--dy hot in the summer
not only can, but will. Very much so.
Better in the mountains, but then the winter is coldish.

toffeez
18th Mar 2013, 07:29
I think you now have your answer.

rogerg
18th Mar 2013, 07:40
Things have deteriorated in the last few years and they try to keep their finances in the UK
They must have known!!

Capetonian
18th Mar 2013, 08:16
11FEB
airship Be very careful merch......

Otherwise, "as an expatriate in search of a suitable retirement place", please do not otherwise risk it all on the Cypriot government (in terms of providing heath-care) or their banks, when considering your own future requirements?

Wise and prophetic words, airship!

stuckgear
18th Mar 2013, 08:25
indeed cape, was just perusing through this thread too and thought the same thing..


airship gets a :D for that !

500 above
18th Mar 2013, 08:41
To the OP

It's still a fantastic country to live in. Sure, it has it's problems at the moment. If you came over and rented, kept a UK bank account etc then why not give it a go?

With an E-111 or whatever it's called now, you get emergency healthcare in Cyprus. You would not need private healthcare as you are over the retirement age. You can register in any local CAB type building for the healthcare card in Cyprus. The healthcare here is actually pretty good, all UK or Israeli trained doctors. Only younger expats such as early retires need private healthcare. When you register with the Cypriot authorities for the 'yellow slip' residents paperwork they will ask for proof of this and proof of pension. They have no issues with the pension being paid in to a foreign account.

The cost of living has gone up in the past few years. Cyprus has Europes highest electricity bills, most expensive bread and most expensive milk. Unleaded petrol is presently 1.46 Euros/litre for 95. However, you could rent an apartment for 350 Euros per month, council tax is 135 per year, meat is cheap for the BBQ, fresh veg virtually nothing, a beer on tap is 1 Euro, a large kebab in pitta with salad is 4 Euros, if you smoke, cigs are about the cheapest in Europe. You don't need a fortune to have a great standard of living.

Cars have come down in price quite a lot in recent years. I pay 35 Euros car tax for a 4 door saloon - per year.

A telephone line with Internet is 75 Euros per month for 12 meg unlimited or 40 Euros for 4 meg unlimited. Satellite based Internet is 30 Euros for 2 Meg. Phone calls are dirt cheap. Mobile phone call costs must be some of the lowest in Europe.

This recent situation has affected expats with all of their savings in Cyprus. For those with UK accounts that transfer only what they need, they are laughing - the pound will strengthen against the Euro.

The economy is obviously down. Not down and out. The recent at natural gas find will be a welcome boost.

From an expat forum:

"After the initial shock of finding out that my bank account was going to be taxed (stolen from as some would put it) i grabbed a beer and sat on the patio to get my thoughts together.

Whether it was the Carlsberg that made me come to this conclusion i dont know.But i see it this way.

What the figure is that my bank account is going to be taxed(again,stolen from as some would have it) it is a fraction of what i have saved in income tax,council tax,TV licence fees,parking charges,car tax,car insurance,petrol costs and a zillion other things that i have saved living on this sunny island in the past ten years or so.

But alas i allways take the view that the glass is half full.

So to all members who are going to draw their money out of their banks next week,posting on here how horrible Cyprus is, and more extreme,leave the island all together have you really give it some thought,and balanced the benefits of still being here despite this nasty shock we have all had."

Quoted from here CyprusLiving • View forum - General Discussion Area (http://cyprusliving.netfirms.com/phpbb/nfphpbb/viewforum.php?f=1&sid=e500283f5959e7bdfc08ef94f192c7fe)