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rogerk
8th Feb 2013, 12:42
.... anyone care to add to this !!

Cuppa
Hubby
Chippy
Telly
Baby Bump

Sunnyjohn
8th Feb 2013, 12:46
Her indoors
The old Trout
SWMBO

all of which are thinly veiled attempts to denigrate women

Dushan
8th Feb 2013, 12:50
Advert
Uni

Captivep
8th Feb 2013, 13:01
"Uni" is Australian originally...

stuckgear
8th Feb 2013, 13:06
onesie.

:ugh::ugh:

wings folded
8th Feb 2013, 13:08
"Simples"

(May not be British in origin, but has been adopted)

Like This - Do That
8th Feb 2013, 13:11
Awfully .... as in "would you mind awfully?" :ok:

'Strine has nothing like it.

Having reviewed the intent of this thread, I apologise. I thought it was endearing and quaint British words and phrases. I'm rather fond of 'awfully'.

Awfully sorry for the thread hijack.

Davaar
8th Feb 2013, 13:13
"Uni" is Australian originally...

Capt! If you are Australian, be quick to distance yourself from it (the "Uni", I mean; not the Aus).

Adam Nams
8th Feb 2013, 13:13
More here (http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml)

Ballywalter Flyer
8th Feb 2013, 13:40
Not quite sure about this thread

Toodle Pip old chap!!!:D

Lightning Mate
8th Feb 2013, 13:45
"level playing field"

B Fraser
8th Feb 2013, 13:45
Well said, I think these words and phrases ought to be celebrated.

On a total thread drift... My doc once told me "Whoever invented decorating needs f**king and whowever invented f**king needs decorating".

jethro15
8th Feb 2013, 13:51
'Babe'
'Babes'
'Innit'
'My days'

sled dog
8th Feb 2013, 14:02
" Its your round "

Fitter2
8th Feb 2013, 14:06
Awfully .... as in "would you mind awfully?" http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif

'Strine has nothing like it.




Nah. But it has 'fraffly'. Used as in 'Fraffly caned a few'. (vid. 'Let's talk Strine'.)

Cyber Bob
8th Feb 2013, 14:24
Malarkey
Wotnot
Thingummy
Whathisname

All text speak

All buzz words,

Sayings;

" You'll smile on the other side of your face in a minute"
" Do you really want another smack"
"If you break both of your legs, don't come running to me"
"Bike, Bike, I'll give you bike"

eastern wiseguy
8th Feb 2013, 14:24
Kiddies....just loathe that word.

vulcanised
8th Feb 2013, 14:28
Wash hand basin. Why not just wash basin?

Human beings. Why not just humans?

Slasher
8th Feb 2013, 14:30
Always found RAF banter a bit hard to understand -

YXmGvDlxIOo

Lightning Mate
8th Feb 2013, 15:11
Slasher, bit behind the drag curve Courtney!

The jet's TU.

RTN11
8th Feb 2013, 15:24
All these phrases are as much use as a chocolate tea pot :ok:

George B Duffy
8th Feb 2013, 15:29
Stonewall.

'That was a stonewall penalty!'

No it wasn't.

Rather be Gardening
8th Feb 2013, 16:14
Simple as
Caff
Narmean
Like, as in: "So I was like...and she was like. etc etc etc"

BANDIT12
8th Feb 2013, 16:20
Tiddlers (meaning kiddies) regional Yorkshire one.

Its a fair cop gov.

Tally ho.

innuendo
8th Feb 2013, 16:23
Chrimbo,
Sets my teeth on edge, if it is not of British origin my apologies but somehow that is where I seem to feel it has come from.

TRC
8th Feb 2013, 16:25
'At the end of the day'

I HATE that..

Slasher
8th Feb 2013, 16:26
Bandit - what's wrong with Tally ho?? :confused:

Battle Of Britain (Movie) - Stuka Vs Spitfire - YouTube

500N
8th Feb 2013, 16:27
"What's wrong with Tally ho??"

I was going to ask the same thing.


The one that gets me at the moment is:-

Nek minnit

wings folded
8th Feb 2013, 16:40
'At the end of the day'



It is midnight. Time to be in bed.

When all is said and done.

Because tomorrow is another day.

ZOOKER
8th Feb 2013, 16:42
"Info'.
The folks who kept No.6 imprisoned in The Village' didn't keep saying "we want info".
'Going forward'. - What??
'Toddler', meaning a young child.
'Train station'.

toffeez
8th Feb 2013, 16:46
Although "going forward" should be banned and anyone using it sent back to school, I'd suggest it's more American than Brit.

Now there's a word I dislike "Brit".

wings folded
8th Feb 2013, 16:50
Now there's a word I dislike "Brit".


So why did you use it?

Ancient Observer
8th Feb 2013, 16:51
"Ladies and Gentlemen, I am sorry that we are unable to board at this point in time"

Why do they say "at this point in time"????

Tankertrashnav
8th Feb 2013, 16:51
Chrimbo,
Sets my teeth on edge, if it is not of British origin my apologies but somehow that is where I seem to feel it has come from.


Chrimbo has to be Australian, innuendo, see also "arvo" (afternoon). Others which are very silly are "rellies" for relatives, "veggies" for vegetables and many more.

Yes I know this is meant to be about annoying and silly British words and phrases, but what's wrong with a bit of thread drift, especially if it's at the Aussies' expense? ;)

ZOOKER
8th Feb 2013, 16:54
'Celebs', 'goss', goss about celebs, 'factoids', 'Britain is braced for more bad weather'.
'Cold-snap'.
Why do we never have a hot-snap, or a foggy-snap, or calm-snap, better still a thundery-snap.

vee-tail-1
8th Feb 2013, 17:01
Fings like that.
Obviously.
At the end of the day.
At this moment of time.
I am clear that ...
Full and frank discussion ...

fireflybob
8th Feb 2013, 17:23
Time this thread was kicked into touch

Helol
8th Feb 2013, 17:23
Myther - as in 'Stop mythering (bothering, annoying)'. Pehaps a 'northern' word..?

Scryc (crying). No idea how to spell it. Again, perhaps more of a northern word?

wings folded
8th Feb 2013, 17:46
There is nowt wrong with "myther" which is a perfectly good dialect word and never seen in dubious Dail Mail articles.

Come back and see me when you have worked out what it means.

Vitesse
8th Feb 2013, 17:47
Gutted and Gobsmacked.

Can people think of nothing better to describe their feelings?

"I'm Gutted". Have they seen what chefs do to fish?

El Grifo
8th Feb 2013, 17:49
The term or phrase "one pence" breaks my balls :ugh:

Even more so than "one pee"

james ozzie
8th Feb 2013, 19:18
Why not South France? There is no South of Africa, South of America, South of Australia, North of France etc etc (Hmm. I think there is a South of Spain??)

El Grifo
8th Feb 2013, 19:21
Not to mention "South of England"

Loose rivets
8th Feb 2013, 19:31
Erm, Southern England please.:p Unless of course, you were referring to people who are forrin.








.

Loose rivets
8th Feb 2013, 19:32
Cost me an arm and a leg. Hate that.

Helol
8th Feb 2013, 19:37
Wingsfolded - I know what 'myther' means, I use it often, just like my mum used to - usually when I was whining to her that 'I wanted this' and 'I wanted that', etc.

I like the word.

vulcanised
8th Feb 2013, 19:40
"With their hard earned money".

They rarely know whether it's hard earned or even stolen.

Helol
8th Feb 2013, 19:43
Why not a simple 'Yes' instead of everything being 'absolutely'.

con-pilot
8th Feb 2013, 19:58
"aircon"

Instead of saying air conditioning. What, too many vowels to pronounce?

El Grifo
8th Feb 2013, 20:10
Hey Con, I will raise you by 10 and see you !!!

"Awesome"

Not a commonly used adjective used in the "Old World"

An adjective commonly used to describe a burger in your neck o' the woods.

jus sayin :ok:

redsnail
8th Feb 2013, 20:15
Chrimbo is not Australian. Chrissie however is.
Never heard the word Chrimbo until I came to the UK.

Loki
8th Feb 2013, 20:21
"Back in the day" Where did that come from?

Also get annoyed by the BBC announcing a football/ rugby match screening, using "vee" instead of "versus"

G-CPTN
8th Feb 2013, 21:01
get annoyed by the BBC announcing a football/ rugby match screening, using "vee" instead of "versus"
That boils my pi55!

500N
8th Feb 2013, 21:08
"Chrimbo is not Australian. Chrissie however is."

Agree.

I was trying to think of what was used here and Chrissie it is.



Where does Chrimbo come from ?
And Xmas for that matter ?

innuendo
8th Feb 2013, 21:24
"At this point in time", and variations.

I have always thought that we have John Dean and cohorts at Senator Ervin's hearings to thank for that abomination. It got a lot of play on TV and seemed to spread like the dreaded Lurgy.
I have never thought that the UK was responsible.

vulcanised
8th Feb 2013, 21:33
Out of the same shed as 'aircon', how about 'apps' for applications?

Hydromet
8th Feb 2013, 22:05
Also get annoyed by the BBC announcing a football/ rugby match screening, using "vee" instead of "versus"...or the gerund form of versus, as in "Team A is versing team B today...".

TURIN
8th Feb 2013, 22:15
Thanking You.

Not three bad.

However, I can put up with all of the above just please, please, my American friends, stop saying DEPLANE!!!:mad:

What's wrong with disembark?

RedhillPhil
8th Feb 2013, 23:07
Weather forecasters on the idiot box, there's a massive range of adjectives out there that sometimes simply defy belief.

Don't forget the ever popular "literally" as in, "I literally died when I saw her", I literally cried at the sight".

My first mother-in-law in Cambridge was always spinning around during her conversations.
"I turned round and said" and then she turned round and said, "so I turned round and said".

alisoncc
9th Feb 2013, 05:33
Well Actually I don't see what all the fuss is about - actually

Cunning_Stunt
9th Feb 2013, 06:16
Frightfully good looking. Thanks awfully. Terribly nice chap. Don't you know.

Tableview
9th Feb 2013, 06:27
"So I was like, you know, and she went, like ..........."

BlueDiamond
9th Feb 2013, 06:41
How do you do?

Err ... how do I do what? :confused:

And the quaint way the British have of describing some dreadful catastrophe or other as "a spot of bother over in ..." while a little paper-cut on the finger is "the most frightful mess."

FlyerFoto
9th Feb 2013, 07:01
Not to mention - which people then do!

Wingswinger
9th Feb 2013, 07:05
"No problem" when engaged in a purchase or paying a bill:

Me: "Thank you".

Waiter: "No problem".

I should hope not! if there is he's "got a problem!"

"Issues" as in "Have you got any issues with that". GRRRRRRRR.

500N
9th Feb 2013, 07:06
""So I was like, you know, and she went, like ..........."

I think that might have come from an Australian Comedy
and then went across and was repeated on Neighbours,
which we know went worldwide.

I'll try to find the video.

Edit - can't find the video but it was Kylie Mole,
spotty faced schoolgirl in I think the Comedy company.

ExSp33db1rd
9th Feb 2013, 07:18
"Have a nice day" - was once American, but seems to be Worldwide now.

"How's your day been then ? " by the supermarket check-out person.

sometimes I tell them, then they wish they hadn't asked !

Wingswinger
9th Feb 2013, 07:19
Another: "Bored of...". It's bored WITH or BY

Capot
9th Feb 2013, 07:24
Inappropriate - meaning wrong/stupid/dangerous/illegal/racist/whatever, but I'm a fluffy moron who's been taught never to say a word that might offend.

Issue - meaning problem/difficulty/incapability/whatever, but I'm a fluffy mor...you know the rest.

re post above; Bored of :D

Wingswinger
9th Feb 2013, 07:31
"Enjoy"

Enjoy what precisely.

When a Barista at a chain coffee shop says "enjoy" as I pick up the drink I feel like saying "don't be silly, it's only corporate garbage - you know, mass-produced, adulterated sweepings off the warehouse floor".

Tableview
9th Feb 2013, 07:51
"Can I get a double whjpped skinny latte with froth ....."

Wingswinger
9th Feb 2013, 08:33
Oh yes, That too!

"No, you stay there, I'll get it for you! What was it? A choca-mocca-frappy-nappy?"

Pelikal
9th Feb 2013, 08:49
For some reason, I feel awkward with Jim-Jams for a form of night clothing. I don't find the term offensive or anything like that. Just kind of awkward. My great nephew and his Mum use it all the time.

Surely, there will be a whole generation who can't spell pyg...pyj...am...o...urs.....oh dash, bother and heck.:\

Tankertrashnav
9th Feb 2013, 08:50
Myther - as in 'Stop mythering (bothering, annoying)'. Pehaps a 'northern' word..?



The Oldie magazine has a regular item on unusual words and their derivations. This month's word is 'moither' or 'moider' which means the same and is obviously a variation of 'myther'. It is common throughout the north, as well as in Scotland and Northern Ireland. The English Dialect Dictionary gives many examples of its use, and the first written reference is found in Shakespeare's time.

FlyerFoto
9th Feb 2013, 08:59
People saying 'I would of' or 'I should of' when the word is have, not of.

Not a saying, but a lack of understanding the English language.

I also believe anyone using popular corporate phrases, such as 'singing from the same hymn sheet', referring to figures as 'k' rather than thousand, should be shot!

Pelikal
9th Feb 2013, 09:12
FF, shooting those people is far too quick.

ZOOKER
9th Feb 2013, 09:15
Having completed a purchase or a transaction and said 'thank-you', person behind the counter then says "see you later". No, you won't, I will not be returning here today.
This seems to be a northern custom and it threw me a bit when I moved to this part of the country.
But I do like the Scottish "that's us then", or "that's you then".

RedhillPhil
9th Feb 2013, 09:30
I suppose that "They" will say it's a natural progression ot development of the language but as a frequent train user...
"We are now approaching our final destination". There's only one destination.
"Take care whilst alighting the train". You mean whilst alighting from the train.
"This is your Train Manager speaking". You don't belong to me pal.
"Your next station is". I don't own any stations.
"This is your First Great Western service" No it's not, it's yours.

ricardian
9th Feb 2013, 09:35
Try making your very own Shakespearian insult:

http://sphotos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/487459_552994441386217_1667498739_n.jpg

Slasher
9th Feb 2013, 09:40
Thou beslubbering fen-sucked flax wench!

Must remember Ric's table whenever I'm in Finish The Sentence... :)

FlyerFoto
9th Feb 2013, 09:55
Thanks Phil - you've just reminded me of another couple of railway ones which really 'get on my t1ts'

'Your next station stop' - which seemed popular although I would never announce a station where we didn't stop and

'We are now entering into' - which makes no sense whatsover!

Railway jargon, as with aviation jargon, is made up of all kinds of things which may have made sense in the past, but which don't make sense nowadays - we had a new Managing Director started, who had someone draw up a list of terms, so he knew what people were talking about!

'Bobby' for signalman, 'Dolly' for shunting signal - I could say that the list was endless, but it did eventually...

fwjc
9th Feb 2013, 10:12
Thread drift warning.

Seeing as it's okay to pick on the Antipodeans, what about those from North America. Apparently they're more sensitive than the British, because they "Could care less."

I would like to say that I could not care less about their corruption of the phrase, but I admit that I do. It's obvious that the people who drop the "not" have no idea what they're actually saying.

greenslopes
9th Feb 2013, 10:17
Hunky Dory, Toodle Pip,Top Notch. Naff

Blues&twos
9th Feb 2013, 10:18
When sports commentators speak of multiple title winners, and say, for example "The seven-time world champion". Surely it should be "seven-times"??

2 sheds
9th Feb 2013, 10:28
Ah, yes - sports commentators! Use of a player's name as an adjective - as in "In the ..th minute, a (player's name) goal equalised."

2 s

Blues&twos
9th Feb 2013, 10:34
"Just some fries please, nothing else."
"Would you like a drink with that?"

And why can you only buy medium or large portions...?

Private jet
9th Feb 2013, 10:42
The staple line that is trotted out whenever there is any official f*ck up......

"Lessons will be learned".... [ = Those responsible and/or accountable will not be blamed/dismissed/punished in any way]

Wingswinger
9th Feb 2013, 11:08
"There has been a systems failure" or "it's a cultural problem" = no one person is responsible so no-one can be sacked.

Business management-speak generally. :yuk::yuk::yuk:

Sunnyjohn
9th Feb 2013, 11:30
"This is your last and final call for . . . "
"Entry level"which, thank goodness, seems to be disappearing
"Solutions" as in "Bedroom solutions" which I thought was what you were left with after a good night.
If you're a cycle enthusiast, you apparently are unable to understand words of more than one syllable. We now have "lube" for lubricant and "mech" for mechanism.
"She was like ..." instead of she said or she thought.
"I am very sorry for the delay to the 8.24 to Knotty Ash." No you're not, you couldn't give a chocolate farthing.

vulcanised
9th Feb 2013, 11:51
'I mean to say' - well just bloody well get on and say it then (BBC person).

I believe 'Crimbo' (not chrimbo) originated in Liverpool (or perhaps they stole it http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cool.gif)

ZOOKER
9th Feb 2013, 12:01
"Your M and S".
Well can I have one of my carrier bags to put my purchases in?
Certainly, that will be 5 New Pence.

FlyerFoto
9th Feb 2013, 13:38
ANY description for size of a cup used for an over-priced, pretentious cup of coffee...

'Not for the faint-hearted' - probably THE most ridiculous phrase used in car and bike advertising...

'sorry for the wait' when you've arrived at the checkout as the cutomer in front is departing...

'Over and out' which, we were always taught, is the most meaningless phrase in radio communication...

BUT...

The most annoying phrase ever used in the English language...





















'Have you been mis-sold PPI by your bank or building society?'

cavortingcheetah
9th Feb 2013, 13:45
Might one throw
'easi peasi'
onto the bonfire?

vulcanised
9th Feb 2013, 14:25
Only if you take 'Lemon Squeezy' http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/pukey.gif with it.

Scoggy
9th Feb 2013, 16:00
"So I turned round to him and said..."

Then he turned round to me...

Dervishes the lot of 'em

Sprogget
9th Feb 2013, 16:58
A quick scan of this thread strongly suggests many contributors last visited these shores in 1952. Innit.

Krystal n chips
9th Feb 2013, 17:11
Might as well add :

"laters"

"any time soon"....so beloved of "fearless" reporters at times. " In the near or immediate future" presumably being far too complex for them to actually risk saying when broadcasting live.

"the ultimate"......attached to promote just about any product / event and facile in that others invariably follow.

Cockney slang / Essex "Inglish"..... leave what aht?..Guv.

"me duck "...Seems to start at Stoke and then crosses the East Midlands and then to East Anglia....do I look like a :mad:ing duck?, have I got webbed fingers ?....No !

"fantastic"...uttered at times for merely being correct.

Haraka
9th Feb 2013, 17:11
The lack of any normal positive adjective but:
.
.
.
.
.
.
"Nice"

except,
.
.
"Stunning"
.
.

( or "Awesome")

Sunnyjohn
9th Feb 2013, 17:31
Well, sorry but I think this thread is brill . . . (euk!)

G-CPTN
9th Feb 2013, 17:36
Well, sorry but I think this thread is brill . . .
Did you mean mega ?

RedhillPhil
9th Feb 2013, 18:31
Thanks Phil - you've just reminded me of another couple of railway ones which really 'get on my t1ts'

'Your next station stop' - which seemed popular although I would never announce a station where we didn't stop and

'We are now entering into' - which makes no sense whatsover!

Railway jargon, as with aviation jargon, is made up of all kinds of things which may have made sense in the past, but which don't make sense nowadays - we had a new Managing Director started, who had someone draw up a list of terms, so he knew what people were talking about!

'Bobby' for signalman, 'Dolly' for shunting signal - I could say that the list was endless, but it did eventually...

Ah jargon. I used to be a railway operations instructor. Day one would mention jargon and how easy it was to fall into it to the confusion of all around.
An incident has occured..........
"What happened"?
"He was running light, missed the dod, went through the traps and now he's in the dirt".

I once saw at Clapham Junction on platform 11 a handwritten sign at the bottom of the stairs.
P.I.O.O.U.
P.L.F.A.

Heston
9th Feb 2013, 19:35
"he went" or "he goes" for "he said"

Apologies if that's been done - I haven't read the whole thread.

Laters...

Sunnyjohn
9th Feb 2013, 20:10
Not to worry Heston - it's so awful it's worth repeating, like . . .

ZOOKER
9th Feb 2013, 21:51
"Deffo".

Allegedly an abbreviated form of definitely.

This also sounds like the name of a Radio 1 knob-jockey who has a weekday show between 0300 and 0500, playing mostly rap 'music'.

RedhillPhil
10th Feb 2013, 11:08
"Signage" - the word is signing.
"Outage" - it's loss of power.
"Directorial debut" - making his/her debut as a director.

Loki
10th Feb 2013, 11:56
I keep hearing "stand out" from the BBC, instead of the perfectly sensible "outstanding".

radeng
10th Feb 2013, 13:09
Long ago, before corporate speak introduced '10k' instead of 'ten thousand', radio engineers always referred to items such as a 10,000 ohm resistor as a '10k'. Because kilo is the prefix for thousand.....

When you get inadequate technicians moving into marketing, you get such idiocies as 'we don't have the bandwidth for that operation'.

Bandwidth is defined in the international Radio Regulations.........

Private jet
10th Feb 2013, 13:27
At a supermarket checkout, with a dozen items & obviously no bag of my own......."Do you need any carrier bags?"...."No, i was thinking about juggling them out of the shop of course i need a bag!"

Vercingetorix
10th Feb 2013, 13:50
So many sad sacs on here. LoL.:eek:

vulcanised
10th Feb 2013, 14:13
Yes, there's another one - 'LOL'.

Usually used to terminate something feeble and unfunny.

bnt
10th Feb 2013, 15:11
There is (apparently) a big rugby match going on, down the road from me, and in talking to someone here I described the weather as "grotty". Then I had to explain what "grotty" means. So it's a Silly British word to Irish folks, at least. :hmm:

Choxolate
10th Feb 2013, 15:47
Use of "Epicentre" to imply something more central than centre - as in "it is care to patients that shold be at the epicentre of the NHS". Epicentre is a geologicval term meaning the point on the Earth's surface above the focus of an earthquake.

Adding "why? Because" in the middle of a statement - particularly done by the Beeb's leftie Political Editor, Nick Robinson, as in "David Cameron is facing a test of his leadership in the commons today. Why? Because.... yadda,yadda". Drives me nuts and adds nothing.

Sunnyjohn
10th Feb 2013, 17:11
Rocket - for rise
Plummet - for fall
Slam - for hit
Smash - for accident
(apologies Daily Fail-ers)
Wake-up call - for those unable to properly use the English language

Blues&twos
10th Feb 2013, 18:21
"For the sake of auld lang syne" rather than the correct "For auld lang syne"
Irritates me every New Year. Must be the Scottish in me.

G-CPTN
10th Feb 2013, 18:46
Smash - for accident
Accident when it is a smash, crash or collision that wasn't an accident (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accident).

Charlie Foxtrot India
11th Feb 2013, 09:43
It's onomatopoeia innit

rans6andrew
11th Feb 2013, 11:17
Where should I start?

Things that I find really annoying;

people who use "y'know" and "I mean" for 70% of the words in anything they say.

people who describe single events that have already happened using "goes", "does", "says", there is a PAST tense which is free to use and covers the situation very well!

people who pronounce "f" when "th" would make more sense. As in "free" when they mean "three", "Fred" when they mean "thread" four etc. I doubt that any of them know what a "fink" is but they still say "I fink".

people who say "it is 10 times less", multiply anything by 10 and you will that find it gets to be more!

Rans6.....

Wingswinger
11th Feb 2013, 18:30
"Me and my mate went to.......arghhhh! MY MATE AND I!

"Myself and my mate went to ".......ARRGGHHHHHH! See above.

"The amount of people who"......... NO, NO, NO, people cannot be an amount! They are not grains of sand on a beach. "THE NUMBER Of people" is correct.

"Less than twenty people"........ NOOOOOOO! FEWER than twenty people.

Good. That's off my chest.

Sunnyjohn
11th Feb 2013, 18:34
Back in 2004.
Why back in 2004? Why not just "in 2004"?

obgraham
11th Feb 2013, 18:36
People who say "extrordinry" when they mean "extra-ordinary". Toffs, mostly.

rgbrock1
11th Feb 2013, 18:36
Don't know if it's silly or annoying but I also found it a bit odd, shall we say, that over yonder a "fanny" is used to describe the "frontal aspect" of a woman yet over here it's used to describe the "rear aspect" of a woman. (Or man, for that matter.)

wings folded
11th Feb 2013, 18:48
Not silly nor annoying, RGB, just different.

There are many more.

Wingswinger
11th Feb 2013, 20:00
Transportation for transport. The truck is the transport utilised for the TRANSPORTATION of goods.

Momentarily in the sense of soon. Momentarily means briefly (over here).

Schedule pronounced SKEDULE. It's SHEDULE in British English.

They're American things which have caught on here through business-speak.

Slasher
11th Feb 2013, 20:10
Weird here in Asia.

I'm told to download my "shedule" as I'm "sheduled" to do sim training, but
once I've signed on for it I'm referred to as being "skedded" out of line ops.


Another is "Light off" (UK) or "Light up" (US) depending on who wrote the jet
engine manual. I've never lit off a cigarette though...

lashamfield
11th Feb 2013, 20:38
Actually another one that goes with "awfully" is "actually" - as in Hove "actually"
Think aussies have lots as, cossies, swimmers, stubbies, budgie smugglers, Brisie.s

Hydromet
11th Feb 2013, 20:58
"Ceremoany" - the word is "ceremony".

Tableview
11th Feb 2013, 21:26
"You can speak to myself."

awqward
11th Feb 2013, 21:37
I was sat.... or I was stood

Calling all desserts "pudding"

Lorry, Estate car, Saloon car

KAG
11th Feb 2013, 23:21
I'm told to download my "shedule" as I'm "sheduled" to do sim trainingNot "shedule" but "schedule".

Informative thread for somebody like me...

Ogre
12th Feb 2013, 01:45
Technical manuals are heading the same way, the days of a prescribed set of words to describe actions appears to passed. The latest batch of maintenance manuals are littered with "Do the following.......", and that's from the US!

Mind you I reviewed a technical report from someone a couple of years ago and sent if back because "Text speak is not a recognised format for imparting installations instructions to the customer"

Arm out the window
12th Feb 2013, 02:01
"The amount of people who"......... NO, NO, NO, people cannot be an amount! They are not grains of sand on a beach.

Easy there, wingswinger. Grains of sand on a beach can't be an amount either - they are numbered too, though I wouldn't want to count them.

I could have an amount of sand (trailer load, bucket, kilogram etc.) but if I had grains of sand, it'd be a number of them.

Slasher
12th Feb 2013, 05:26
"Ceremoany" - the word is "ceremony".

I've been to a shotgun wedding that can be rightfully described as a full-on
"ceremoany" Hydro.

And no it wasn't mine! ;)

Krystal n chips
12th Feb 2013, 05:49
The use of the word "so" as in:

"My fridge is just so empty ".

Overheard last night when uttered by one "precious little madam" to her equally "precious" friend...in, strangely enough, a supermarket.

sitigeltfel
12th Feb 2013, 07:26
Sloppy speech, such as "Lorry Norder" when they mean "Law and Order."

Nearly every TV news programme features this, or similar slurring of phrases.

radeng
12th Feb 2013, 10:40
It is written 'schedule', pronounced in English as 'shedule', but at the same time, nobody goes to 'shule' - spelt school!

ATNotts
12th Feb 2013, 11:56
BBC's dumbed down weather forecasts in which we have:-

Yellow Warning = normal english weather
Amber warning = heavy normal english weather
Red Warning = something we might possibly need to worry about

Then there's the posessives:-

"our" weather front / band of rain (do we own it?)

Band of rain / snow (don't we mean warm, cold or occluded front?)

BBC weather forecasts are now written for Newsround, not for intelligent grown-ups - perhaps there aren't enough intelligent people left!

2 sheds
12th Feb 2013, 12:23
BBC's dumbed down weather forecastsNot forgetting that cold weather or precipitation is BAD (usually accompanied by a "distasteful" gesture, childish wrinking of the nose by the silly tart presenter), although the worse that it is, the more that it is announced with great relish. Warm and dry weather is GOOD - although only up to a point, beyond which it has to be accompanied by sunscreen advice and grave warnings of excessive exposure.

There is now a new "science" programme presented by three clowns (all professors or doctors, for goodness' sake) which is at about the same level as Blue Peter. Apparently, the UK alone invented radar and the jet engine.

2 s

ExRAFRadar
12th Feb 2013, 12:30
I was literally going to post on here, literally thought better of it but then, literally, thought '**** it' and literally posted.

Literally.

awqward
12th Feb 2013, 13:23
Anyone spelling realize and authorize etc are dismissed derisively as using the American spelling....look up the Oxford English Dictionary....they are the British spelling...

It is mainly due to Mr Gates' spellchecker that couldn't be bothered distinguishing Latin roots from Greek roots that Brits think otherwise

Lancelot37
12th Feb 2013, 13:35
The use of "Chair of the Committee". A chair is an object to sit on.

Any reasonably educated person will know that it is "Chairman" whether male or female. And that the person is addresses as "Madam Chairman" if female.

Time that these PC pillocks found something better to do with their time.

rans6andrew
12th Feb 2013, 14:39
web forms that demand "country - select from list" and only offer the UK which is not a country. Why can't they have "England" (or Northern Ireland, Wales or Scotland) which is a country?

G-CPTN
12th Feb 2013, 14:51
Transportation for transport. The truck is the transport utilised for the TRANSPORTATION of goods.

Referred to as logistics nowadays.

Wingswinger
12th Feb 2013, 18:23
Easy there, wingswinger. Grains of sand on a beach can't be an amount either - they are numbered too, though I wouldn't want to count them.

Take your point. I thought that myself when I wrote it. What about a pile of steaming farmyard manure?

Wingswinger
12th Feb 2013, 18:25
It is written 'schedule', pronounced in English as 'shedule', but at the same time, nobody goes to 'shule' - spelt school!

Except in Germany, nicht wahr?

Wingswinger
12th Feb 2013, 18:28
Oh my God! OMG! or Oh. My. God. or any other variation thereof uttered by (vacuous) people who obviously have no God.

rgbrock1
12th Feb 2013, 18:40
It is written 'schedule', pronounced in English as 'shedule',Um, not in every variant of the English language. Here in the colonies we spell it 'schedule' and pronounce it as 'sked-u-el'.

Got a problem with that? :E

obgraham
12th Feb 2013, 20:43
Oh my GodThough sadly infrequent now, I consider it quite a compliment.

Wingswinger
12th Feb 2013, 20:51
"Appeal" and "protest" used without the preposition "against". One cannot "appeal" a conviction or "protest" the leniency of a sentence because appeal and protest are intransitive verbs which do not take a direct object. One has to appeal or protest against something. Americanisms again, I fear.

Tankertrashnav
12th Feb 2013, 21:51
...but at the same time, nobody goes to 'shule' - spelt school!

Except in Germany, nicht wahr?


Think most practising Jews attend shule (pronounced as written). Not sure exactly what it is though

Tankertrashnav
12th Feb 2013, 21:59
Don't know if it's silly or annoying but I also found it a bit odd, shall we say, that over yonder a "fanny" is used to describe the "frontal aspect" of a woman yet over here it's used to describe the "rear aspect" of a woman. (Or man, for that matter.)


Brock, as a boy the English author Leslie Thomas was evacuated to a Devon village in WW2. He tells that one day one of the local ladies slipped in the street and fell on her backside and was helped up by a polite GI who was billeted in the village. The next day, on seeing her in the village shop, the GI inquired "Morning Mrs Brown, how's your fanny feeling today?"

Stunned silence in the packed shop!

Capetonian
2nd Jul 2014, 22:27
“Can I help you at all, Sir?”
“Will you be having any snacks at all?”
“Will you be having milk and sugar with your tea at all .......?”

Gargleblaster
2nd Jul 2014, 23:21
bladibladibla ... untill the aircraft has come to a complete stop !

malcolm380
3rd Jul 2014, 02:20
Sports teams being singular entities here in the USA, as in USA advances to the round of 16, or England is eliminated :(

paulc
3rd Jul 2014, 05:59
Anything said by Gus Hedges in the tv comedy "Drop the Dead Donkey" which has now become everyday management speak

sitigeltfel
3rd Jul 2014, 06:22
The use of "Chair of the Committee". A chair is an object to sit on.

Any reasonably educated person will know that it is "Chairman" whether male or female. And that the person is addresses as "Madam Chairman" if female.

Time that these PC pillocks found something better to do with their time.

"Can you please direct your comments to the chair?"

"Which one, there are a lot of chairs in the room?"

"The big one at the end of the table."

"You want me to talk to a piece of furniture?"

"No, just to the person sitting on the chair."

"How do I address that person?"

"Just refer to him/her as the chair."

"You want me to refer to the senior person in the room as a piece of inanimate furniture?"

"The chair is the position that person occupies."

" I understand that, but what do I call the person sitting on it?"

"He/she is referred to as the chair."

"So, the chair is sitting on a chair. Can I call him/her a stacking chair?"

"No, just Chair."

"Can you remind me why I am here?"

mikedreamer787
3rd Jul 2014, 07:49
"The chair recognises Michael K Dreamer"

"Which chair?"

"That one."

"The chair recognises me?"

"Yes"

"And does the bloke in the chair recognise me too?"

"Yes"

"Funny.....I've never met either of 'em before...."

"Please address your comments to the chair"

"Oh ok. Hello chair. Hang on....say didn't I sit and fart on you one evening at the Peninsula Club in Singapore?"

"No Mr Dreamer...[ahem]....address the chair"

"Mr Dreamer....that's me!"

"You?"

"Yes me. I am the chair"

"No you're not."

"Yes I am"

"No you're not"

"Yes....I AM!"

"You're a bloke not a chair!"

"I sit in the presiding chair at this meeting"

"But you're not the chair though"

"Yes I am"

"No you're not."

"We are NOT doing this again! Now to clarify, the chair, which is ME, recognises Mr Dreamer"

"How do you recognise me? I don't know you from a bar of friggin soap"

"By raising your hand you were recognised"

"My hand? You...you...recognised me by....my hand?"

"Yes"

"That's incredible!"

"What is incredible Mr Dreamer?"

"The fact you recognised me by my hand alone! Face and build et cetera I can understand....but my hand?"

"We are not arguing verbal semantics any further sir. Please make your statement"

"I mean you could recognise Bev over there by her huge tits alone, but a hand...."

"POINT OF ORDER MR DREAMER! This is a meeting...not a drunk's bar!"

"Ok um....can you run by me again whether I talk to you or your dumb chair?"

Blacksheep
3rd Jul 2014, 10:14
I'm a Chair, but no-one has sat on me yet. ;)


The clue is in the Capital.
I believe the idea is to strip the office of any connotation of personality. In any case, there are plenty of legal documents that refer to "the Chair ..." as the office, the personality of the office holder being of no consequence.

goudie
3rd Jul 2014, 10:46
Instead of just saying 'goodbye' all one hears now is...
'see you la'er, luv yoo'

ETOPS
3rd Jul 2014, 11:07
And back to the BBC weather persons....where exactly is "Northy Stingland"?

Fox3WheresMyBanana
3rd Jul 2014, 15:33
Northy Stingland ('cos Sting comes from there) = Jord Eeland !

Gertrude the Wombat
3rd Jul 2014, 15:53
I'm a Chair, but no-one has sat on me yet. ;)


The clue is in the Capital.
I believe the idea is to strip the office of any connotation of personality. In any case, there are plenty of legal documents that refer to "the Chair ..." as the office, the personality of the office holder being of no consequence.
More to the point, it's quicker to just say "chair" and there's more than enough unnecessary verbiage at most meetings already.

david1300
3rd Jul 2014, 17:08
“Can I help you at all, Sir?”
“Will you be having any snacks at all?”
“Will you be having milk and sugar with your tea at all .......?”

Currently on a short visit to RSA, I smiled when I heard that the NUMSA strikers had "thrown their cars with stones" this morning (when the person was referring to those who wanted to ignite the strike and go to work).

Choxolate
3rd Jul 2014, 17:41
"I'm loving it" when they mean "I love it"

dfdasein
3rd Jul 2014, 18:06
I've forgotten the bulk of my pet hate words... Ah there's one: BULK. Weather forecasters main culprits: "the bulk of the country"; "the bulk of the day". Not sure it's wrong, just sounds so to me.

27mm
3rd Jul 2014, 18:20
"De-escalate" - heard that today ref ME

Windy Militant
3rd Jul 2014, 18:28
I heard the phrase that really makes my skin crawl and my flesh creep for the first time in yonks on the radio today.

"I love it to bits"

it's got to be the most insincere thing I've ever heard and seems to be the twee middle class version of "um nice" when used with regard to haircuts or clothes or any thing really.:yuk:

pppdrive
3rd Jul 2014, 18:52
How about people who ask a question, but not the question that leads to an answer they are expecting.

(Q) Is the flight from London on time? (A) No. Then a wait whilst the questioner decides to ask the correct question....What time is the flight from London expected to arrive?

(Q) Can I get a Taxi here? (A) Yes. Then a wait and eventually.... Where can I get a Taxi to take me into Town?

Or what I call a cheeky question;
Can I have a ticket to Paris? No, you'll have to purchase one, same as everyone else.

Finally, the miss-use of the word presently, which most people incorrectly take to mean some time in the future. The clue is the the word minus the 'ly'

SpringHeeledJack
3rd Jul 2014, 19:47
Mullered, to mean wasted, given a good going over, etc. Attributed to Gert Mueller who laid waste to the England football team in the 1980's apparently.


SHJ

Capetonian
3rd Jul 2014, 19:51
Currently on a short visit to RSA, I smiled when I heard that the NUMSA strikers had "thrown their cars with stones" this morningA very common Southafricanism. The other one is : "I'll smack you through the face........"

Somewhere I have a photo of a newspaper poster carrying the headline : "Stoned bus hits girl."

Stanwell
4th Jul 2014, 08:11
Windy,
'I love it to bits.'


I first heard that one on the radio in the '50s.
There was a catchy little song on the 'hit parade' at the time.
It was about an interplanetary visitor who'd taken a shine to an Earthling girl.


A couple of lines from memory...
'... "I wuv you, I wuv you!" said the little green man
"I wuv you, I wuv you to bits!"
- and (he) scared me right out of my wits!'


I wonder whether anyone else remembers that one.

27mm
4th Jul 2014, 09:05
At this moment in time = now

Octopussy2
4th Jul 2014, 11:03
"On-boarding" ie. to integrate a new employee - arrrrgggghh. I have lots more. But then I work for an American company, so hardly surprising.

Windy Militant
4th Jul 2014, 16:28
Stanwell
That sounds even more annoying than the Ran-Dells Martian Hop! :ugh:;)

Edited to say it was a little blue man and it is definately :mad: worse than the Martian Hop. :ugh: :ugh:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5H5yhjgMkQ

Stanwell
4th Jul 2014, 16:53
Thanks for that, Windy.
I definitely won't go searching for the 'Martian Hop' then!

Windy Militant
4th Jul 2014, 17:03
I wouldn't if I was you Stanwell. It's one of the worst earworms known to man, whatever colour they are. Once heard it will buzz round your brains for months!:ugh:

Juliet Sierra Papa
4th Jul 2014, 21:00
Currently on a short visit to RSA, I smiled when I heard that the NUMSA strikers had "thrown their cars with stones" this morning
A very common Southafricanism. The other one is : "I'll smack you through the face........"

Another classic is I'll frow you wif a stone

:ok:

Capetonian
4th Jul 2014, 21:06
jNJVMJH5OhI

ZOOKER
4th Jul 2014, 22:54
"Caught on camera", = photographed.

RJM
5th Jul 2014, 00:51
'Ahead of' as in '...ahead of the match on...'

What's wrong with 'before' or 'prior to' if you want to sound a bit toffier.

sidevalve
5th Jul 2014, 06:04
When Madame and I are asked, "What can I get you guys..?"

Parked up

Iconic (it appears that just about everything is iconic)

Engage

Or sentences like: "Now that the body has been found, the family can bring closure to the grieving process.."

etc etc..

mikedreamer787
5th Jul 2014, 06:19
Saying "proactive" when "active" should be used, eg She has a very proactive life playing a variety of sports.

FlyOnTheWall2014
5th Jul 2014, 09:18
Scot Mills-isms - "Hello, this is Becky off of Southampton"! etc.

:mad:

vulcanised
5th Jul 2014, 11:48
The alarming number of people who say 'Nucular' instead of 'Nuclear'.

Why ?

mikedreamer787
5th Jul 2014, 13:25
"Ok folks let's give it up for......"

When I first heard that at a concert I wondered what it is I'm supposed to
give up? My seat? My basic rights? Small change? What?

To this day I'm STILL wondering WTF I'm expected to actually give up!

Whatever happened to "Put your hands together for...." or "Let's give a big
hand to...." :confused: Twas far less confusing in the good old days than this latte
slurping bullshit way of speaking.

Tankertrashnav
5th Jul 2014, 16:52
For some reason the recent use of the German "Über" to replace "super" is something I find irritating (Über -cool, Über trendy etc).

Churchill would not have approved - he made every effort to avoid words with Germanic roots if at all possible, going for the Latin equivalent instead, although at the time there were obvious reasons why he would think that way!

How long before we are talking about ubersonic aircraft?

Loki
5th Jul 2014, 17:35
The word "standout" seems to have replaced "outstanding", especially amongst sports commentators....where did that come from?

ZOOKER
5th Jul 2014, 18:26
'Championing' and 'showcasing'. What's that all about?

ExSp33db1rd
5th Jul 2014, 19:32
Woman, when they mean Women, as in " this will benefit all Woman".

Almost always mis-used in NZ Media. Weren't they brung up proper ?:ugh:

27mm
5th Jul 2014, 19:35
"Chair" of a committee, etc; chairs are for sitting on!

Tankertrashnav
5th Jul 2014, 22:35
Woman, when they mean Women, as in " this will benefit all Woman".




Isn't that just something to do with the odd way the NZers pronounce the i sound in a lot of words? Thus women (wimin) becomes wumun. As in the cricket commentator saying:

"He's hut ut for sux" ;)

mikedreamer787
6th Jul 2014, 11:16
Ask a Kiwi to say the following -

The sick shiekh's sixth sheep sucks at sex.

dubbleyew eight
7th Jul 2014, 01:38
basil tut tut it isn't australian it is spoken as "strine" in the vernacular of that sentence.

gupta
7th Jul 2014, 02:57
Masterchef et al now refer to the "hero of the dish" to mean the main ingredient

AtomKraft
7th Jul 2014, 04:46
'Absolutely!' Continues to get my goat.

What's wrong with 'yes'? :ugh:

hei yu
7th Jul 2014, 05:38
Is it time-critical ? Not yet and don't call me critical

Raw sewage . Do some people cook it?

mikedreamer787
7th Jul 2014, 07:14
> Do some people cook it? <

Well....yeah. Don't you?

http://gistreel.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/wpid-q+1.jpg

Windy Militant
7th Jul 2014, 17:54
Hei Yu
Look it's taken us thirty years to get the operatives at the sewage farm (Ding Ding Ding) to call the stuff coming in RAW Sewage. We were aiming for Effulent but no you had to upset them and now we're back in the Sh:mad:t again! :ugh:

hei yu
8th Jul 2014, 08:24
WM
Clearly they weren't taking you seriously ... just going through the motions.

mikedreamer787
9th Jul 2014, 07:02
I wince when I hear or see "My bad".

Who was the idiot who invented that?

RedhillPhil
9th Jul 2014, 10:00
"Right from the get go". You mean right from the start.


"Can I get a Cappuccino". No, the assistant gets it, you pay and drink it.


"I was like..." What you're trying to say with your limited
vocabulary is, "I thought...."

Wingswinger
9th Jul 2014, 10:13
Considering all the money that has been spent on education down the years it is an outrage that the overwhelming majority of British people are unable to speak or write their own language clearly and unambiguously while applying the time-honoured rules of grammar and punctuation. Jeez. :{:{:{:{

vulcanised
9th Jul 2014, 11:39
"I mean to say"

Just bloodywell get on and say it then.

Tankertrashnav
9th Jul 2014, 15:35
Not exactly annoying, but nevertheless puzzling:

1974 - "Have you got a pencil?" - "Yes I have".

2014 - "Have you got a pencil?" - "Yes I do".

Not sure where that came from. The usual explanation is from over the pond. Is that the case in this one?

jez d
9th Jul 2014, 16:29
English, the ultimate language for extemporisation.

On asking his subaltern what the problem was with the jeep that had come to a sudden stop, my father was informed, "The fooking, fooker's, fooking fooked... Sir!"

obgraham
9th Jul 2014, 16:45
As I read this list of annoying terms and phrases, clearly most all of them originated over here. More specifically, in the California suburban "Valley Speak" culture.

Why can't you lot cook up your own annoying terms, without stealing ours?

Wingswinger
9th Jul 2014, 18:37
I don't know if it's been mentioned yet: Negatively impact. :yuk::yuk:

In fact, impact used as a verb meaning affect. Missiles, meteorites, express trains and falling boulders HAVE an impact. Everything else has an affect or influence. If a person wishes to use the Latin root the correct form is "impinge upon". Impact is from the supine of the Latin verb impingere, impactum. To use "impact" as a verb is just so illiterate.

500N
9th Jul 2014, 18:40
Why can't you lot cook up your own annoying terms, without stealing ours?

Because you have perfected the butchering of a good language :O

ZOOKER
9th Jul 2014, 18:57
"Train-station"?

GrumpyOldFart
9th Jul 2014, 20:04
"Cheers..."

Stanwell
9th Jul 2014, 20:39
"...perfected the butchering of a good language."


While I roll my eyes at what they do to English, I derive amusement from what they do to what French they can get their hands on.


Also, I think it was George Dubya who was quoted as saying... "The problem with the French is that they don't have a word for 'entrepreneur'."

perthsaint
9th Jul 2014, 20:50
Alrighty makes me want to throw up.

Wingswinger
14th Jul 2014, 08:04
"for free"

Free is an adjective so cannot be governed by a preposition. Something offered for no pecuniary consideration is quite simply "free".

"outside of" in the sense of except or exclusion.

It's a double preposition. Why not just say except, apart from or simply outside? However "outside" can be used as a noun as in "the outside of the house".

"Bored of"

It should be "bored with" or "bored by".

"Off of"

Where in God's name did this come from?

John Hill
14th Jul 2014, 08:09
"Take out" to kill...

-OR-

'Knock knock', 'Good Evening, I am Tristrum and I have called to take out Muriel this evening.'

Wingswinger
14th Jul 2014, 09:33
"Mahoosive"

Would some kind soul please explain what that's all about?

500N
14th Jul 2014, 09:35
John

What is wrong with ""Take out" to kill" ?

John Hill
14th Jul 2014, 09:37
What is wrong with ""Take out" to kill" ?

It what one does with the favourite girl.

Simmbob
14th Jul 2014, 09:52
Power outage !!!


What is wrong with power cut? :*


Simmbob

Vercingetorix
14th Jul 2014, 10:54
ZOOKER
Train Station
I would assume that is because if you call someone in the USA to pick you up at the station they automatically assume that you are at the bus station. No one there uses trains in the way that the UK does so they differentiate and specify.:ok:

Keef
14th Jul 2014, 11:25
"We're waiting on a delivery".
... visions of waiters serving the delivery its breakfast.

They usually mean "We're waiting FOR a delivery".

GrumpyOldFart
14th Jul 2014, 14:47
'take a decision' when they mean 'make a decision' - or, better still, 'decide'

Capetonian
14th Jul 2014, 17:49
"Should of ......."

"Are we OK there sir?"

"Is there anything else I can help you wiff today ......" (after being unhelpful to the point of obstructiveness and wasting my time.

Tankertrashnav
14th Jul 2014, 22:06
No one there uses trains in the way that the UK does so they differentiate and specify


I think Zooker meant train station as opposed to railway station. The latter used to be the common usage in the UK but has switched to train station in my lifetime.

Btw suburban trains around NYC, Chicago etc are crammed to the doors, just like here, but I take your point that long distance rail travel makes little sense with the distances involved, especially as US trains are generally even slower than ours!

Capetonian
31st Dec 2014, 13:01
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/7593647/100%25.jpg

100% of what?
This was the only part of an otherwise inedible breakfast on a flight yesterday that I was able to consume, and it wasn't great.

wings folded
31st Dec 2014, 13:11
100% free

It is either free, or you have to pay something for it.

Will 100% pregnant be the next?

Capetonian
31st Dec 2014, 13:17
Just like 'totally unlimited'.

rgbrock1
31st Dec 2014, 14:32
"cheeky monkey". I've heard this phrase on a couple of occasions, uttered by a few of the Queen's subjects. Each time I heard it I wanted to bludgeon..... oh never mind. :}:E

seacue
31st Dec 2014, 14:54
Mr (formerly General) D. D. Eisenhower used the "nucular" pronunciation when running for office. It is reported that he knew the correct pronunciation, but chose the incorrect to be more like "one of the people".

wings folded
31st Dec 2014, 15:10
I've heard this phrase on a couple of occasions, uttered by a few of the Queen's subjects. A superb example of annoying and silly phrases.

UK citizens are not subjects of anything or anybody.

(well, to be strictly precise, they can of course be subjects of verbs, e.g. "Mr Typical Brit kicked the arse of the man who said that"

-verb: kicked
-object: arse
-subject: Mr Typical Brit

Clear now? :8

superq7
31st Dec 2014, 15:23
I beg to differ Wings.

subjects. singular subject, a person who is under the dominion or rule of a sovereign.

wings folded
31st Dec 2014, 15:35
Your unattributed, and what appears to be a simplified dictionary definition, does not quite go into the depth required to be accurate. Take a look at the British Nationality Act 1948 which clarified things a bit, but even prior to that, people were British Subjects, not the monarch's subjects (it was of course not the queen then but King George)

TSR2
31st Dec 2014, 15:44
How about 'Thats pi$$ed on the chips'..... an almighty cock-up.

Hobo
31st Dec 2014, 15:52
'thanks for sharing'

'close knit community' usually 'struggling to come to terms' with some 'tradegy' or other....

superq7
31st Dec 2014, 15:55
Ah I see wings you are quite correct, sorry about that, Stuart.

Capetonian
31st Dec 2014, 16:01
To further complicate things, a British Subject is not the same as a British Citizen (the latter having the right of abode in the UK, the former not.)

wings folded
31st Dec 2014, 16:01
No need to apologise; it is a complicated topic, and not surprising that our American friends get it wrong a lot, because it, is true to say, why should they give a shit?

Capetonian, we were typing pretty much in synchro; yes, you put your finger on one of the complications - there are others

G-CPTN
31st Dec 2014, 16:07
Stakeholder - for what was a customer or, even, a patient.

wings folded
31st Dec 2014, 16:12
'close knit community' usually 'struggling to come to terms' with some 'tradegy' or other....Disasters, tragedies, horrendous events only strike "close knit communities" (from what I read in the press)

If I were to be about to relocate, I would be looking for a completely ragged arsed community. Much safer

Hydromet
31st Dec 2014, 20:34
You've raised one of my many pet peeves, G-CPTN. A stakeholder is, and always will be as far as I am concerned, the person who holds the stakes of a wager, until the wager is resolved.

419
31st Dec 2014, 21:57
A stakeholder is, and always will be as far as I am concerned, the person who holds the stakes of a wager, until the wager is resolved.
There is of course, one other type of stakeholder.
http://www.asset1.net/tv/pictures/356/200/movie/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-1992/BUFFY-THE-VAMPIRE-SLAYER-1992-DI-01.jpg

Hobo
1st Jan 2015, 07:54
'choice'

as in 'double tasteful, well choice'

joy ride
1st Jan 2015, 08:21
"Pre-order" and "pre-book". If you want to buy something that is not yet available or for use at a later date you "book" it or "order" it. No need at all for the "pre" which means "before". Therefore "pre-ordering" must be the process of picking up the phone or going on-line to make your advance purchase!

"We will soon be arriving into ... " announcements on planes and now trains, surely the correct grammar is "arriving at ..." or "arriving in..." ?

Customers asking "Can I get" instead of "Can I have". Daft.

Now common on TV programmes, especially history/documentaries: "If Napoleon would have known...." instead of "If Napoleon had known".

Arm out the window
1st Jan 2015, 08:22
"Can I get a Cappuccino". No, the assistant gets it, you pay and drink it.


Well, not really - the assistant makes it, you pay for it, get it and drink it!

I can't see myself ordering one by saying "Can I pay for and drink a cappuccino please?"

wings folded
1st Jan 2015, 08:43
I experimented once by saying "a cappucino, please".
It seemed to work, so I have used that formula ever since (except when I want an expresso, but it is easy to adapt it)

2 sheds
1st Jan 2015, 09:15
Ahem...espresso! :O

wings folded
1st Jan 2015, 12:08
I generally add "please" - it is more polite :p

So I will say "Ahem, espresso ... please"

And the waitress can't hear my bad spelling.

Exascot
1st Jan 2015, 12:47
It really annoys me here where a white (no nationally mentioned!) will say to a local, 'get me a beer'. I always say, 'Please may I have... '. In Greece there is a polite phrase which literally translates as, 'Perhaps you have....?'. This however could just result in a yes or a no if misunderstood.

Also, in both countries the request starts with, Good Morning, how are you?'

Paraffin Budgie
5th Jan 2015, 11:34
When in the US a uniformed person of power says, "I need you to....."

No you don't. You WANT me to............

vulcanised
5th Jan 2015, 11:44
'Know what I mean?'

Tankertrashnav
5th Jan 2015, 14:45
"Heading up" - I first heard this when visiting a police station in London about 20 years ago, as in "Inspector Bloggs is heading up the new drugs team". Thought it was some form of "Met speak" at the time, but now nobody heads anything (apart from a ball), it has to be "heads up".

wings folded - things have moved on even more since 1948. This may clarify

The term British subject currently refers, in British nationality law, to a limited class of people defined by Part IV of the British Nationality Act 1981. Under that Act, two groups of people became "British subjects"; the first were people from the Republic of Ireland born before 1949 who already claimed subject status, and the second covered a number of people who had previously been considered "British subjects without citizenship", and were not considered citizens of any other country. This second group were predominantly residents of colonies which had become independent, but who had not become citizens of the new country. The status cannot be inherited, and is lost on the acquisition of any other citizenship; it will therefore cease to exist on the death of the last remaining subjects.

It must really annoy those Irish referred to to know that they are among the last British subjects left, whilst the rest of us are citizens.

Meanwhile over the pond, with Obama behaving more and more like the first emperor of the USA, looks like nearly 250 years after ditching the monarchy our cousins may soon be "presidential subjects"!

"Land of the free", anyone? ;)

Capetonian
5th Jan 2015, 15:19
I hope you had a good start to the year

I just wanted to touch base ...........

Hmmmmm ...... she's quite a nice looking blonde. Thinking of a reply along the lines if I let you touch my base, can I touch yours?