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Alloa Akbar
8th Feb 2013, 07:07
Frickin' car thieves.. actually, burglars and car thieves in this case..

Great outcome though..

BBC News - Two die as stolen car crashes in Salford (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-21377614)

RAOFLMFAO :E:}:E

stuckgear
8th Feb 2013, 07:14
the only sad thing is AA, is the owner of the Audi and the other cars damaged have lost their cars will have higher premiums themselves over the next 5 years.

green granite
8th Feb 2013, 07:15
Great outcome, two less parasites in the world. :ok:

B Fraser
8th Feb 2013, 07:22
A much needed drop of chlorine in the gene pool.

Alloa Akbar
8th Feb 2013, 07:23
Stuckgear - You are right.. how remiss of me..

Sincere condolences to those who have lost cars in this event.. :E

gingernut
8th Feb 2013, 07:33
My insurance company doesn't cover me for loss if the car's stolen using keys. Hope the owners okay.

radeng
8th Feb 2013, 07:56
It's a pity that we can't have an official method of cleaning the gene pool without writing off a perfectly good car or two.

Flying Lawyer
8th Feb 2013, 07:57
My insurance company doesn't cover me for loss if the car's stolen using keys. That's worrying. I wonder if it's a widespread exclusion.

Cars, especially valuable cars, are sometimes taken using keys stolen from the owner's house in the course of a burglary or, increasingly commonly, through the letterbox.
Criminals know that many people leave their keys on a hall table or similar just inside their front door and have devised ways of stealing them without entering the property.



FL

Lon More
8th Feb 2013, 08:01
that many people leave their keys on a hall table or similar just inside their front door and have devised ways of stealing them without entering the property. Usually involves a fishing rod through the letter box. Easy solution; block up the letterbox in the front door and put one outside.

If the thieves actually break in and take the keys then does the insurance pay?

Takan Inchovit
8th Feb 2013, 08:12
As long as the thieves did not use the house keys to break in. :hmm:

RJM
8th Feb 2013, 08:17
While there are high tech anti-theft devices (some of which only tell you what happenned - past tense - to your car after the thief drove away in it, there are two or three low tech devices which will either keep the car immobile despite the key being used, or will stop the car soon after it's stolen, hopefullyn in a place where the thief will have to simply walk away from it.

None of these items would be expected by your average car jacker:

Fuel tap - installed in the fuel line an accessible from inside the car. Don't worry about nanny design rules.

Battery isolater - a heavy duty switch in the low tension circuit.

Ignition cut out - a simple switch in the ignition wiring.

Each of these can be hidden somewhere unexpected - passenger footwell, under a seat, in the glovebox... I wired a car up once so it wouldn't start with the cigarette lighter in its socket.

For those interested, I also have a good working knowledge of exhaust cutouts (which bypass the muffler) and copper exhaust pipes - horrible pollution but a fantastic, reverberating sound which has the amusing side-effect of setting off the alarms on any nearby SAAB. Volvo or other namby wagons.

teeteringhead
8th Feb 2013, 08:45
That's worrying. I wonder if it's a widespread exclusion.
.. probably is... once knew of a chap who left his keys in the car while paying for petrol and had it TWOCed......

...... oh - forgot to mention he'd also left his girlfriend in the car :eek: who was threatened by the scum who nicked it, and then thrown out of the car just down the road - fortunately they had stopped the car before chucking the girl out!

Insurance Company: "Well, sir, you left the keys in it ........."

stuckgear
8th Feb 2013, 08:50
But if the vehicle is occupied wouldn't that be classed as a car jacking ?

one would suppose the 'perps' were let off with a caution. :hmm:

G-CPTN
8th Feb 2013, 08:52
I really cannot understand people who leave their car keys in a prominent position. :ugh:

Mine are always in my pocket or fastened to my belt (except when they are in the ignition switch and I am using the vehicle).

I also always remove the keys whenever I leave the car, even for a few moments.

Even if the vehicle is shared between family members, a duplicate set of keys costs less than the subsequent loss of the vehicle.

spekesoftly
8th Feb 2013, 09:08
Each of these can be hidden somewhere unexpected - passenger footwell, under a seat, in the glovebox...

None of these items would be expected by your average car jacker:



But now added to the car jackers' list of Top Tips ! ;)

Fox3WheresMyBanana
8th Feb 2013, 09:49
Ladies & gentlemen, my deepest sympathies. One of the reasons I quit the UK.
I leave my keys in the car almost all the time here.

We get TWOCing occasionally.....

Teen charged with tractor theft after low-speed chase - Prince Edward Island - CBC News (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2009/07/06/pei-stolen-tractor.html)

500N
8th Feb 2013, 09:56
"the only sad thing is AA, is the owner of the Audi and the other cars damaged have lost their cars will have higher premiums themselves over the next 5 years."


Don't you have Permanent Rating 1 in the UK after a set period of years ?

We have insurance companies over here (well mine does) that I am
on the best level all the time, whether I lose my car or not.

stuckgear
8th Feb 2013, 10:10
Don't you have Permanent Rating 1 in the UK after a set period of years ?

We have insurance companies over here (well mine does) that I am
on the best level all the time, whether I lose my car or not.

when you apply for motor insurance, you will be required to state if you have had any claims in the past years, fault or not.

of course, we have the 'no claims discount', however, it's 'no claims' (against your policy) not 'no blames'.

so the people who have had their car stolen and the others damaged, will be subject to a insurance payout, if of course the insurer doesnt find a way to void the payout, with the insured having to disclose if they have made a claim in the past 5 years. Failure to disclose or misinform the insurer will result in the policy being void.

they may well have taken out a no claims protection bolt on at additional cost, however before the premium is calculated the disclose of of any claims in the past 5 years must be disclosed. so you get your no claims discount yes, but the policy premium is increased anyway.

spekesoftly
8th Feb 2013, 10:15
Don't you have Permanent Rating 1 in the UK after a set period of years ?
Something similar - protected no claims discount (or bonus) after a period of claim-free years, but you pay extra for it. Its value is questionable, because even though your NCD may be protected at say 60%, it does not necessarily prevent an overall increase in premium after a claim!

sitigeltfel
8th Feb 2013, 11:26
There will be some, including relatives of the scrotes and possibly an opportunist politician, who will put the blame on the police for this.

Tableview
8th Feb 2013, 11:42
Solution to the losses of innocent third parties in cases like this : Sue the persons who gave birth to these excuses for human beings.

A A Gruntpuddock
8th Feb 2013, 11:49
"I also always remove the keys whenever I leave the car, even for a few moments."

Locked the keys in the car once when in a rush so now I always take them, even when shutting the garage door.

Turned once to see a young guy in a hoodie swerving to peer into the car as he passed - would have lost it if I had left the keys in.

Would still have cheered if he had totalled it and killed himself.

RJM
11th Feb 2013, 02:41
But now added to the car jackers' list of Top Tips !

I was assuming that not too many car thieves in Australia would be reading PPRuNe! Anyway, I use other places rthan those mentioned.

Further to low-tech anti-theft devices, there is more scope on older cars than newer models. I dislike keys, and a few years ago in open (convertible) cars without ignition steering locks etc, I would bypass the ignition key entirely with a couple of my clever hidden switches.

racedo
11th Feb 2013, 18:31
In younger days used to drive a hot hatch. After 1 attempt at nicking it where the scrotes must have sh1t themselves when their attempt at unlocking the steering wheel lock caused airbag to go off (was long time ago). I then just took out the fuel pump fuse when I parked at home. 2 more attempts to nick it but nothing happened despite their wishes.

Was nice to ring cops though to tell the name of the scrote and the exact address he lived at, alledgedly a 5am walk up call followed as was wanted anyway for something else.

He didn't get done for mine but 6 months later caught on a motorbike and got 15 months...................... made me smile.

gingernut
11th Feb 2013, 19:26
That's worrying. I wonder if it's a widespread exclusion.

I reckon it's 'cos the buggers are more or less unstealable without the keys or a winch. Think there's some sort of similar thing about leaving your car on the drive, engine running, defrosting.

G-CPTN
11th Feb 2013, 19:37
BBC News - BMW owners hit by hi-tech theft (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19562487)

BBC One - Watchdog - BMW: Open to car theft? (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006mg74/features/bmw-car-theft-technology)