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probes
6th Feb 2013, 11:01
Based on the video, I'd qualify as 60/70+ :ouch:.

BBC News - The Cambridge lab where they test how elderly people use technology (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20664470)

Well, I'm probably kinda faster with my fingers, but somehow I really don't feel I need the modern gadgets, so something's obviously wrong :).

603DX
6th Feb 2013, 11:37
I feel that the stereotype image of older people feeling inadequate when confronted for the first time with current technology like iPhones, Tablets, etc is unfair. Everyone, of whatever age, needs the knowledge based on previous experience or the instruction manual, to enable them to operate a device they have not seen before!

A youngster does not possess some inbuilt instinct which immediately tells them what to press, swipe, switch or squeeze to switch it on, and then explore its functions. Only if they have been shown how, or if they have previously been familiar with a similar device, can they instantly demonstrate dexterity in operating it. We all need time to assimilate a different technique necessary for technological devices new to us.

If older people have consciously refused to consider trying out novel technology, then of course they will appear as bumbling Luddites to younger folk, but this is their own fault. The only difference between the old and the young in assimilating new technology is probably the relative speed with which they are able to learn the skills required. Nature generally blesses the young with quicker reactions and quicker wits than the elderly, who have suffered a bit of 'wear and tear' as the years pass! On the other hand age and low cunning can still often defeat youth and inexperience, so it all evens out in the end! ;)

500N
6th Feb 2013, 11:44
"but somehow I really don't feel I need the modern gadgets, so something's obviously wrong"


No, I am the same and I worked in the tech industry.

Just don't feel the need to have the latest, flashiest, you beaut gadget.

And I did read somewhere that older people like to use the technology
- ie mobile phones - but just don't need all the functions. They just
want a simple mobile, dial numbers, contact list and that's it.

I had this discussion on the weekend, was told "iphones" are great,
do the banking, x, y and z. I said I just do it when I get home.

Maybe I am getting old !!!

treadigraph
6th Feb 2013, 12:00
Just don't feel the need to have the latest, flashiest, you beaut gadget.




Me too. I use PC/Laptop for any interneting I need to do (all banking and much of my shopping) and (reluctantly I have to say) have a basic mobile phone for "urgent" calls should I really need to make 'em.

A friend of mine (48) buys all the latest gadgets and has ruined many a pub guessing game - all right, bunch of 40/50/60ish topers trying to remember who so and so was that was in that band in 1968, or whatever - by looking it up there and then. Where's the fun in that? The laugh is, he so busy doing all this stuff that when it comes time to actually make a call, the battery's flat!

My mum (91) on the other hand has a laptop and a mobile but refuses to use them - I think because she is nervous of the technology, but she at least does ask the family to use the laptop to do the big food shop online and order other stuff for her - she appreciates the benefits and is in awe of the potential, but just does not feel able to partake herself. I suspect she's worried that she might break the internet; imagine that...

G-CPTN
6th Feb 2013, 12:05
I suspect she's worried that she might break the internet; imagine that... 6th Feb 2013 12:44
I can recall being worried that I would break the Sinclair Spectrum if I typed the wrong instructions . . . (no internet in those days).

ILS32
6th Feb 2013, 12:05
It;s not down to age I have a mobile phone(9.25 at Morrisons) it makes calls and receives calls,have sent 5 Text messages in 10 years.Its all that I need,but when it comes to technology in regards to my cameras,media and software for my computers and connections to my television then that is another matter.I'm 65 now and if I see new technology that I think will be beneficial to me then I buy it. Technology for the sake of it is something that doesn't interest me.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
6th Feb 2013, 12:11
603DX is perfectly correct, ability to aquire knowledge is based on previous experience in this context. There is also the ability to learn. Many older people have not done much learning for a number of years, and without practice this skill deteriorates. I saw this first at age 35, when sitting some financial exams. Many of a similar age around me were panicking as they hadn't sat an exam since Uni. Being aircrew, I'd never stopped learning, so found it a breeze.

It's then a question of making new systems which replicate what older people already know. I wrote a custom program for a school I worked at where the main interface replicated the previous paper system everyone was used to. For the major users, I gave them interfaces which matched their other office systems, after talking it through with each of them. Result: everybody happy, no manual required, no training required, system still in use 8 years later.
This is how technology is supposed to work.

500N
6th Feb 2013, 12:14
Well I am glad I am not the only one.

I see my GF's young kids, 18, 14 and 12, 2 have the latest phone
but never cary it or use it and all 3 spend all spare time on the
computers playing games.

Lightning Mate
6th Feb 2013, 12:20
I have a mobile phone(9.25 at Morrisons)

Ripoff! Mine was 5 at ASDA.

I don't text - I have no need. Neither do I do online banking. Hackers are having a field day at the moment with modern all-singing all-dancing mobiles.

Only four people know my mobile number and that's the way it will stay.

Photographs? DSLRs beat all mobiles. The quality of photographs taken on mobiles is dreadful. All the circuitry inside is wasted when the lens is the size of a pea. In addition, my DSLR has no less than thirty shooting options - try that on a mobile!

Blacksheep
6th Feb 2013, 12:22
Recently swapped my old Blackberry for a nice new 'Android' Smart phone. Its magic. Its blue-tooth coupled to the car so I can make calls using the button on the steering wheel while the phone stays in my pocket. I still have my old iPod Touch 'cos it has all my music on it and I don't want to use up too much memory on the phone. I use an iPad 3 for most things, but I'm still exploring Windows 8 after loading it onto my touch screen lap-top recently. There was a rather bad glitch that locked me out at first, but I've sorted that out now. The home wi-fi network includes two PCs, three iPads (mine, wife's and daughter's) and a remote printer/scanner that serves all devices - including the smartphone.

I have silver hair, but I'm still only 65, so maybe I'll turn into a slow, befuddled fogie when I get to be "elderly". ;)

G-CPTN
6th Feb 2013, 12:35
My 10 PAYG mobile phone sends/receives voice and text calls - no camera or image files.
I don't have a smartphone. Although I would like to have access to the internet when mobile I fear that this would be expensive. Can anyone quantify this?

I have a laptop (more convenient than a floortop) and this is connected to the internet (and sites like this) whenever I am awake and at home.

I don't use (or want) Twatter or Farcebook or any other social sites such as Friends (I tried it but found it woefully inadequate) other than PPRuNe and a vehicle bulletin board.

I monitor local and national news websites and frequently forward items to my family for their information.

I don't have an iPlayer or use the Bluetooth facilities in my car. I carry a (very) small personal radio which is permanently connected to BBC R5.

I carry a modest DSLR when I am out and take many photographs, mostly for personal viewing only.

sitigeltfel
6th Feb 2013, 12:35
A youngster does not possess some inbuilt instinct which immediately tells them what to press, swipe, switch or squeeze to switch it on, and then explore its functions.I have seen toddlers, who having been allowed to play with their parents tablet computer, become frustrated when the pictures on a magazine page don't react when they stab at them.

G-CPTN
6th Feb 2013, 12:37
I have seen toddlers, who having been allowed to play with their parents tablet computer, become frustrated when the pictures on a magazine page don't react when they stab at them.
Yes, I have seen the same with my 3-year old grandson, also touching and swiping my laptop screen.

OFSO
6th Feb 2013, 12:47
A load of old b*llocks. I'me 70 at the end of this year, in the past few months I've embraced (no, this post shouldn't be on the Jimmy Saville thread) several new and different operating systems, have bought a new tablet (must be honest I selected one with the same version of OS used in my phone to speed up getting it on-line), installed a new satellite receiver with Ethernet feed, swapped and set up new LNB's, and done other tech stuff. I look on such "challenges" as ways of keeping the old grey matter going, just as the daily visit to the gym keeps the body ticking over.

P.S. No I don't Twit or Farcebook either. But I write one heck of a lot of e-mails each day. Current subject: international civil service law.

Davaar
6th Feb 2013, 12:49
Voice keeps calling to give me what Voice calls a "cell-phone", free to me because I am a whatever and they love and admire whatevers.

I decline.

Voice asks: Why?"

I reply: "Don't want one".

Voice persists: "But it's free!".

I reply: "Tell you this. Sure as Fate, as soon as I get one of those things, people will call me".

Voice subsides into silence.

603DX
6th Feb 2013, 12:49
Yes, the toddler examples provided by G-CPTN and sitigeltfel are illustrations of very early confrontations with new devices, the first steps on the necessary learning process. And especially, a clear demonstration that any tendency for the mites to become technophobes in later life is most unlikely!

Blacksheep
6th Feb 2013, 12:53
Yes, I have seen the same with my 3-year old grandson, also touching and swiping my laptop screenOur 3 year old grandson pokes and swipes at my laptop screen and also at his Aunty's desktop screen. The difference with the example given is that our devices are modern and up to date, so their touch screens do respond. ;)

As for magazines, he's well aware of books and the written word as both we and his parents sit and read with boys on a regular basis. Reading is good for you. :ok:

G-CPTN
6th Feb 2013, 12:56
3-year-old grandson is also completely relaxed with using a telephone to talk with relatives - no shyness or awkwardness - he willingly converses and relates his activities.

He obviously embraces the concept of connectivity whilst being separated by distance.

Limeygal
6th Feb 2013, 13:00
I am quite tech savvy in so far as having a smart phone and use the computer at work, etc. I refuse to "Chirp", I feel embarrassed just saying the word, it sounds so stupid. Book of Faces leaves me cold. I have a page, but only use it to keep in touch with my sisters, I never post on it. I confine my drivel sharing to JB :ok:

scotbill
6th Feb 2013, 13:10
Although I would like to have access to the internet when mobile I fear that this would be expensive. Can anyone quantify this?Have a perfectly serviceable old fashioned mobile (it actually has buttons which you can press for texting etc) but bought a Pay-as-you-go smartphone to be able to access the internet via 3G in our holiday area (no broadband or Wifi).
Provided I top with 10 for calls, I get a free 300mb download (other providers may do more). Ok - the phone presentation is slow but the signal can be fed into a laptop for ease of working rather than stabbing at the screen with sausage fingers.
You may get more generous provision with a 10 monthly contract but our rate of visiting doesn't warrant that yet.
The technophiles can probably give you more detailed gen. Presumably WiFi is more widely available where you are.

vaqueroaero
6th Feb 2013, 13:13
A youngster does not possess some inbuilt instinct which immediately tells them what to press, swipe, switch or squeeze to switch it on, and then explore its functions.

My son does. When I first got my 'smart' phone I received a call and was pressing the green phone icon, rather than swiping it. He told me I had to swipe it. He was 4 at the time and how he knew that is a mystery.

I was adamant that I would not let him play computer games etc., but I soon realized the futility of it. There are some amazingly clever, highly educational games available on the iPad, which my wife has a gift for finding. Technology is part of his life, he now at six can work all the electronic gadgets in the house, although under strict supervision on the Internet.

Our latest iPad purchase was an app called 'Stop Motion' where you use your iPad to make movies. Me and my son have made some epic Lego escapades......great fun.

No interest in Facebook/Twitter either.

FLCH
6th Feb 2013, 13:13
I don't have a smart phone or computer or access and post on sites like this.

The machines will take us over if we let them. :}

OFSO
6th Feb 2013, 13:27
Although I would like to have access to the internet when mobile

Get a cheap Android tablet with wifi. (Try M*plins, for around 100 quid). It costs nothing for the internet and once you've installed Skype, likewise nothing. Link to the car via Bluetooth, park outside an internet cafe (or McD, but for God's sake don't go and eat in there, sit outside and watch them all eat their horseburgers) and you're on the air for free.

probes
6th Feb 2013, 13:40
Uhh, what a relief! http://mail.yimg.com/ok/u/assets/img/emoticons/emo61.gif

I wrote a custom program for a school I worked at where the main interface replicated the previous paper system everyone was used to. Result: everybody happy, no manual required, no training required, system still in use 8 years later. This is how technology is supposed to work. Absolutely, Fox! I don't want my mailboxes 'updated', and I want my old 'bl0gsp0t' back! I've tried some new ones (like Wordpress) and I didn't like it and then they changed my favorite one...
Blacksheep:I can make calls using the button on the steering wheel while the phone stays in my pocket. I still have my old iPod Touch 'cos it has all my music on it.it probably depends on your way of life, too. If you work with people and talk the whole day, you just want to be quiet when driving home. No music, nothing.
Sitigeltfel:I have seen toddlers, who having been allowed to play with their parents tablet computer, become frustrated when the pictures on a magazine page don't react when they stab at them.That's an interesting issue, actually. When I did not have my Smartboard any more, I almost started writing on the wall for several times, being used to being able to add/highlight things on the image of the overhead. Very annoying. This poking is actually a new paradigm, something like the thumb-generation (messages and games)?
Davaar: Voice keeps calling to give me what Voice calls a "cell-phone", free to me because I am a whatever and they love and admire whatevers.
I decline.
Voice asks: Why?"
I reply: "Don't want one".
Voice persists: "But it's free!". Super! that seems to be an issue, too - as if one were totally nuts if you don't want something that's free.

ILS32
6th Feb 2013, 13:40
I changed my 20 year old Discovery for a new Hyundai in April.When I went to collect it from the garage the salesman began to go through all the switches.buttons.icons on the different screens which lit up when the ignition was turned on.He eventually got round to demonstrating it's Bluetooth capabilities.I told him not to bother because my phone would not work with Bluetooth."Nonsense said he all phones have Bluetooth Technology" and continued with the tuition for another 10 minutes despite my attempts to cut him short.When he had finished I showed him my phone and the look on his face was a joy to behold.He just couldn't believe someone had a phone that did not have Bluetooth.That is the trouble with the must have society.Everybody must have the latest technology,must be able to impress they friends with the latest gadgets and the latest apps.I must be old fashioned in believing if you don't need it don't buy it.

G-CPTN
6th Feb 2013, 14:08
Many years ago (1980s) during a period of unemployment, I was invited for an interview by a guy that I had met at an exhibition whilst I was still working.

After the formalities of the interview he took me out for lunch.

In his Jaguar he had a telephone, but, not only that, it also had an answerphone!

I remember being amazed that the answerphone would be fitted somewhere within the vehicle, being unaware that it was, in fact, located somewhere in the ether (OK, somewhere on a remote server).

A couple of years later, I was, myself, operating from my company car (handsfree) whilst driving, communicating with the office in Germany and alternating (live) between the office in the UK and customers based throughout the UK (all in the same call).

Mind you, the handset was the size of a brick and there was a module in the boot which was the size of two bricks.

rgbrock1
6th Feb 2013, 14:33
I happen to be one of those geeky gadget people. Although I work in I.T. and use computer systems all day I still have time (some) to mess around with gadgets after the work day.

I have a iPad, Kindle Touch, Kindle eReader, iPod Touch, iPod Nano, Blackberry cell phone, 3 laptops (2 Dell, 1 Apple), 3 desktops (2 PCs running Linux and 1 iMac) and a partridge in a pear tree!

I do 100% of my Christmas shopping, for example, on line. I also do the same with banking and paying bills. (And PPRuNe-ing of course.)

Look into buying a Google-branded Asus 7" tablet next as i find the Apple iPad a bit cumbersome.

Having said all that we now turn our attentions to the Mrs.' Audi A4. Want to talk about a technological nightmare? There is not a single item in that car that is intuitive. Even turning on the heat and adjusting the temperature requires a PhD in physics. What a hunk of junk. Even starting the car up requires a Masters Degree at a minimum. To me her Audi A4 is technology gone mad.

Tone
6th Feb 2013, 14:43
I have desktop, laptop, ipad, ipod, android phone & love 'em all. The fact that I'm giving 70 a good push maketh no difference.

Out walking 6 months ago I decided to have a fairly major heart attack leaving Mrs Tone and two friends in the middle of nowhere with a potential corpse on their hands. We only had one phone between us, my android. It took the other 3 adults nearly 10 minutes to figure out how to make the phone work. Still alive & fully recovered but no thanks to HTC. There are times when technology could kill you.

Tankertrashnav
6th Feb 2013, 15:00
Does anyone remember that advert about getting clued up to new technology? Scenario was an office where a seedy looking middle aged man obviously hadn't a clue, and was shown how the computer worked by an attractive young woman worker. Oh yes and he was white and she was black.

Talk about stereotyping! Can you imagine if a fat young black woman had to have a handsome middle aged white bloke show her how to work the systems? The Advertising Standards Agency would have gone into meltdown!

Loose rivets
6th Feb 2013, 15:32
the phone presentation is slow but the signal can be fed into a laptop for ease of working rather than stabbing at the screen with sausage fingers.



How's that work then?


Signed, Mr Fat Fingers.

Davaar
6th Feb 2013, 15:55
I have a iPad, Kindle Touch, Kindle eReader, iPod Touch, iPod Nano, Blackberry cell phone, 3 laptops (2 Dell, 1 Apple), 3 desktops (2 PCs running Linux and 1 iMac) and a partridge in a pear tree!


This makes me feel a real fraud even tio be here. I have one lap top. Don't even know what the others mean.

That Audi reminds me, by opposites, of the best car I ever had, a 1968 Chevrolet Caprice V-8 307 cu.in. two-door hardtop, maroon and white, vinyl roof, eight-track stereo, white side-walls. Could one possibly be seen without white side-walls?

What a wonderful car it was, total contrast to its predecessor but one, the 1949 Rover 75 ("Fill her up! and add a gallon or two of oil!); cost me new a modest trade-in plus $2,200 .00. It had a control marked "Heat". No damned hieroglyphics, Egyptian or otherwise. That was a Golden Age.

If they made 1968s today,I be round at the dealers in a flash.

rgbrock1
6th Feb 2013, 16:14
Davaar wrote:

That Audi reminds me, by opposites, of the best car I ever had, a 1968 Chevrolet Caprice V-8 307 cu.in.

Nice car that was. However, with the price of gasoline/petrol these days it would certainly break the bank. I mean, what did it get for gas mileage, 40 gallons per mile?! :}

Seldomfitforpurpose
6th Feb 2013, 16:34
I changed my 20 year old Discovery for a new Hyundai in April.

That is the trouble with the must have society.Everybody must have the latest technology,must be able to impress they friends with the latest gadgets and the latest apps.I must be old fashioned in believing if you don't need it don't buy it.

Why not either keep your old Disco or simply buy a secondhand replacement......did you really need the latest gadget :ok:

ILS32
6th Feb 2013, 18:39
Seldomfitforpurpose

I suppose I shot myself in the foot seeing that quote but I was writing about the fact that the salesman could not grasp the fact that not everyone has or wants Bluetooth.In regard getting rid of the Disco it was falling apart.Lots of off roading finally caught up with it,and a list as long as your arm of bits that didn't work.With the Hyundai I have miles to the gallon and not gallons to the mile.I do miss it though.

OFSO
6th Feb 2013, 18:44
There is not a single item in that car that is intuitive

Taking delivery of my new Ford and subbornly and obstinately refusing to speak anything but Catalan to the Spanish dealer who had ordered the new car for me with a German handbook, and looking at the voice interface (it understands Castilliano but speaks English), the bluetooth, hard drive, text display of traffic information (in English from a Spanish radio station) GPS, etc.,.....the said dealer said "don't worry - it's intuitive". And guess what ? He was absolutely correct. Ford must have spent billions designing a complicated piece of machinery where you NEVER have to look at the instruction manual.

Oh, er. Not quite true. For some reason the clock (which updates automatically) has to be switched BY HAND from summer to winter time - and back. And I always forget how to do it. But everything else ? Perfect. Idiotensicher (as it says in the manual).

rgbrock1
6th Feb 2013, 18:53
Yes well, OFSO, the Idiotensicher certainly does not apply to the proud owner of an Audi A4. In which the car's manual is needed simply to figure out how to unlock the doors. Let alone work any of the other controls, gadgets, bells and whistles.

Piece of junk as I often enough tell the Mrs. I'll stick with my simplified Honda Civic. (Which, conversely, has absolutely no gadgets, bells and whistles.)

james ozzie
6th Feb 2013, 19:09
I recently replaced my basic phone with a big Samsung. I hate it. It is like holding a plank against your head when using it - I have to skate it around to find the hole where the sound comes out of. And if it rings outdoors, I cannot see the dispaly so I know where to receive the call. Android phones seem to me overated gizmos. But, yes, I accept they can do all the other things that I don't use. But as a basic phone...

vaqueroaero
6th Feb 2013, 19:14
I still drive my 1994 Toyota Celica. Anyway it has this mysterious way of lowering the door windows - you have to turn a handle! I was with a friend the other day and we ended up picking up his daughter from school. Her style was seriously compromised that day. Anyway once she had got over the embarrassment her dad told her to put the window down. She is 16 and had no idea how to do it. Dad had to tell her.

Blues&twos
6th Feb 2013, 19:28
Talking of cars and technology, I can see the point in a lot of electronic stuff, but what actual advantage does an electronic handbrake confer? I am making the assumption that we can all drive properly and do not find a simple hill start a problem. As far as I can work out there are no advantages, but very large bills when it all goes wrong.

Fareastdriver
6th Feb 2013, 19:32
I have an old Nokia. It's a mobile phone. I looks like a telephone and you can move it around with you. Overseas I use a mobile that accepts two sim cards so I can be contacted locally or internationally.
I have never needed anything more.

rgbrock1
6th Feb 2013, 19:39
vaque... wrote:

Anyway once she had got over the embarrassment her dad told her to put the window down. She is 16 and had no idea how to do it. Dad had to tell her.

I have an old record collection. (You know, those vinyl disks 12" in diameter that one plays on a turntable?!!!)

When I showed it to my 16 yo son he looked at it, sort of crossed his eyes and asked me "What is that?"

I showed him how it's done by placing the record album onto the platter of the turntable. His reaction: "What a hassle. My iPod Touch is so much easier."

Oh well.

Slasher
6th Feb 2013, 20:47
Very recently was training a bunch of cadets in the A320 sim. A lot were having
trouble doing a go-around.

"Look" I said "If all else fails get rid of that bloody auto pilot, turn off the flight
director, and kill the autothrust. Then FLY the damn thing like a pilot! Don't let
all this fancy automation rule you!"

Later adjourning to the coffee lounge between sim seshes, a new coffee machine
had been installed that morning. No one had seen this type before. I was having
a lot of trouble getting it to work - ENIAC would've been easier to figure out.

One of the cadets walked up, took a quick look, pushed 2 buttons and out came
my coffee with milk no sugar.

:hmm::hmm::hmm::hmm::hmm:

probes
6th Feb 2013, 20:49
yeah, but you don't have to fly the coffee machine? :cool:

11Fan
6th Feb 2013, 21:08
Went up against a friend's six year old son in a video game. I was dead in under ten seconds.

Milo Minderbinder
6th Feb 2013, 21:30
If I'm out on a computer fixing call and the customer advises in advance that theres problems with an xBox or Wii, I take my 13-year old.....he knows his way around them far better than me!

Blacksheep
6th Feb 2013, 22:06
The objective of technology is to be able to do things that you couldn't do before, and do the things you did before with less effort. For those who want to find their way around the internet using Gopher and download files with a command line FTP programme you still can. I prefer to use my HTC for all communications, talk to my car instead of twiddling knobs and pushing buttons, and chat with the grandchildren in live Hi-definition Facetime on the iPad. But its OK to be a dinosaur, the world is one's oyster, its ok to do your own thing and keep to the old ways.

Cacophonix
6th Feb 2013, 23:32
Old enough to have known better!

;)

Caco

probes
7th Feb 2013, 06:17
The objective of technology is to be able to do things that you couldn't do before, and do the things you did before with less effort.
That's really well put. I presume things you couldn't do, didn't want to (like listening to the radio with the mobile) and still don't want to are not included?
As for me, really fast internet is enough as long as I have a good laptop, too :).

Blacksheep
7th Feb 2013, 06:49
Laptop? Laptops are soooo last year, Dear. ;)

probes
7th Feb 2013, 07:02
So? Last year was a good one, what's wrong with that? :p Didn't you say "do the things you do with less effort"?

rgbrock1
7th Feb 2013, 12:13
Slasher wrote:

"Look" I said "If all else fails get rid of that bloody auto pilot, turn off the flight
director, and kill the autothrust. Then FLY the damn thing like a pilot! Don't let
all this fancy automation rule you!"

You wouldn't find a job at AF would you?

11Fan wrote:

Went up against a friend's six year old son in a video game. I was dead in under ten seconds.

I don't even bother going up against my 16 year old son. I'm usually dead before I even load the first round!

Mac the Knife
7th Feb 2013, 12:27
I still program in Z80 Assembler....

Mac

:sad:

rgbrock1
7th Feb 2013, 12:38
http://benryves.com/bin/z180/2008.09.07.01.LookAroundYou.jpg

rgbrock1
7th Feb 2013, 12:44
In my first enlistment in Uncle Sam's Army I did so as an artilleryman. Not as a gunner but, what is known as, a Cannon Fire Direction Specialist. To plot fire missions we used to use all these manual tools to compute. Until the day came when we gots us a big ol' computer. It was called FADAC. (Field Artillery Digital Automatic Computer)

http://www.ed-thelen.org/comp-hist/BRL61-0254.jpg

MagnusP
7th Feb 2013, 13:42
Today, I'm about 20 years younger than my actual 60. On Sunday I was older, 'cos I felt like $hit.

Technologically, I'm probably a bit younger than 60 as, having spent many years writing software, I'm computer-savvy. Toys? PC, Kindle, iPod, standard mobile rather than smartphone, so probably about my physical age. Guitars? Lots, so still behaving like a twenty-something, and quite convinced I can pull women less than half my age. They're probably just being kind to the aged. :p

probes
10th Feb 2013, 14:15
Joan Collins, 79.
Seriously.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/02/10/article-2276387-17776B6E000005DC-146_630x1021.jpg

(rgbr, yours is an impressive pic, too! :cool:)

vulcanised
10th Feb 2013, 14:22
From the look on her face, I can't help wondering - Is anyone home?

mustpost
10th Feb 2013, 16:13
I'm with Magnus on most of his observations and experiences; not as many guitars but I do still have the trials bike! - and I spend my working days glued in front this sort of thing. No techno fear :rolleyes:
http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj9/mustpost/IMG_1524-1_zps345bb219.jpg

Krystal n chips
10th Feb 2013, 16:55
Young enough to use technology to help my life when needed and on a daily working basis.

Old enough to manage perfectly adequately with so called "outmoded" methods and usage and unlikely to be influenced by glib marketing that tries to inform me "you simply must have "...

A long time advocate and practitioner of the "K.I.S.S" principle.

Sunnyjohn
10th Feb 2013, 17:30
Joan Collins, 79.
Seriously.
How many bibs and tucks did that take?

funfly
11th Feb 2013, 09:02
I have just gained a BA(hons) in interactive media.
Life in the old dog yet (but could someone mention this to my willie)