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sisemen
24th Jan 2013, 14:35
Unfortunately one has now reached the age where the long years of exposure to jet noise are having a telling effect and I was persuaded that I really needed a hearing aid.

I've always skipped right past those adverts in magazines which proclaim the latest technological advances with hearing aids that are just about undetecable and haven't taken much notice of them.

However, now that it is time to have a hearing aid my interest in the devices has obviously increased. After a long period of searching all the options I eventually chose this almost invisible system.

It's true. No one will suspect that I'm now a little hard of hearing.









http://photos1.hi5.com/0032/090/924/jSFVjq090924-02.jpg (http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=royal+observer+corps&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&docid=CB66amfg8oAmFM&tbnid=Zr8Of2qiQ3pAGM:&ved=0CAUQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.talkbass.com%2Fforum%2Ff15%2Flouder-852751%2Findex3.html&ei=HVMBUbb1EIOCiQec5IGADQ&bvm=bv.41248874,d.aGc&psig=AFQjCNFlM3YY13kwEaXAdHdqFS3ucnFHkg&ust=1359127709717329)

sitigeltfel
24th Jan 2013, 14:46
I went to see the doctor about my hearing loss. He gave me some medicine and told me to put two drops a day in my beer.

I've been doing it for 5 days now and I still haven't noticed any improvement.

rgbrock1
24th Jan 2013, 14:59
If you haven't seen any improvement then drink more beer. (Meaning, you need more drops!) :}:}:}

RedhillPhil
24th Jan 2013, 15:58
I've got really bad hearing loss in my right ear - strangely enough the left one is as good as it's ever been. The other thing with my right is the Tinnitus which in my case comes across as a whistling/hissing white noise. I invested in a highly expensive made-to-measure hearing aid which...has not had the least effect because of the Tinnitus.

vulcanised
24th Jan 2013, 17:07
I've got really bad hearing loss in my right ear


Same here! (or should that be 'same hear'?)

Only bright side to that is sleeping on my l/h side means I'm most unlikely to get woken by most things.

AlpineSkier
24th Jan 2013, 17:18
Hearing-aids are similar to double-glazing in that the margins are HUGE. If you need one/two, then push back when they start talking about prices - always very high initially - and there may be very large savings.

lomapaseo
24th Jan 2013, 17:34
Lots of experience here. You can turn the gain way up vs frequency but beyond that the bigger issue is the brain sorting out what's important from any background noise.

The simple solution is just to nod up and down and smile while facing somebody whose lips are moving

Rossian
24th Jan 2013, 17:38
As one who has for some time now been saying everything twice - louder the second time; I have to say that hearing aids however high tech are not the answer to every maiden's prayer.

The ones my wife has are very dinky and invisible (hidden under her hair) but as the detectors are at the back of the units, by necessity, they are better at picking up things behind her rather than face to face. Animated conversation around the dinner table renders them almost ineffective so she takes them out. Sometimes the degree of mutual non comprehension with a couple of her friends, who also wear them, is slightly amusing to others but is very frustrating for them.

However there is a certain "green" person in JB who can speak with a large degree of authority on this subject and she can probably add more sense to this discussion than the rest of us put together (although her appearances in these hallowed halls have been sadly reduced of late, sadly because she usually has something sensible to say).

The Ancient Mariner

27mm
24th Jan 2013, 17:49
RedhillPhil,

I've got gradually more deaf, as well as tinnitus in my left ear in the form of a jet engine at max dry power (a legacy of my distant fast-jet career). It got more and more difficult to put up with the tinnitus, so my GP put me onto the local NHS audiology clinic. They were very thorough and helpful, fitting me with 2 of the standard NHS aids - the sort with an in-ear mould and the electronic gubbins hanging behind each ear. It took about a week to get used to wearing them, but the difference was noticeable immediately - no need to turn up the telly volume, SWMBO commands obeyed at first utterance (not sure if that's an advantage) and a whole raft of sounds that had previously been missing. Additionally, the tinnitus was at least partially masked and so that much more bearable. Would recommend the NHS route to start with, as it's free; then if you subsequently decide you want to go private, you have a much better idea of what you need and want. Also try your local Deaf Association for free advice - the WNDA (West Norfolk Deaf Assoc) in King's Lynn near me are brilliant. PM me if anyone wants any info. :ok:

RedhillPhil
24th Jan 2013, 21:52
RedhillPhil,

I've got gradually more deaf, as well as tinnitus in my left ear in the form of a jet engine at max dry power (a legacy of my distant fast-jet career). It got more and more difficult to put up with the tinnitus, so my GP put me onto the local NHS audiology clinic. They were very thorough and helpful, fitting me with 2 of the standard NHS aids - the sort with an in-ear mould and the electronic gubbins hanging behind each ear. It took about a week to get used to wearing them, but the difference was noticeable immediately - no need to turn up the telly volume, SWMBO commands obeyed at first utterance (not sure if that's an advantage) and a whole raft of sounds that had previously been missing. Additionally, the tinnitus was at least partially masked and so that much more bearable. Would recommend the NHS route to start with, as it's free; then if you subsequently decide you want to go private, you have a much better idea of what you need and want. Also try your local Deaf Association for free advice - the WNDA (West Norfolk Deaf Assoc) in King's Lynn near me are brilliant. PM me if anyone wants any info. :ok:

Thankyou for that. Your description of your Tinnitus is exactly what I have. I tried the NHS route with little result but a lot of very friendly helpfulness which is why I went - in deperation - down the private route. But, as I stated in my original post the amplification just doesn't get past the whistling/hissing. At least I've still got my sight and if it came to Sophie's choice I'd rather be deaf than blind.

seacue
24th Jan 2013, 23:42
I find it interesting that a number of people on this thread have hearing problems with their right ear. I live in North America and hearing in my left ear deteriorated well before the right. Notice the correlation with which side of the head gets the wind noise from an open driver's window?

Probably not related to that, but my left-ear hearing is now essentially useless. An aid in the right ear helps some, but I often forget it when going to the grocery, etc. Noisy surroundings like restaurants are a real problem with monaural hearing.

As RedhillPhil said, I'd MUCH rather be deaf than blind.

GrumpyOldFart
25th Jan 2013, 01:09
Bloke: Doc, I think I'm going deaf.

Doctor: Really? What are the symptoms?

Bloke: Well, they're those yellow-faced cartoon people on TV. But what's that got to do with my hearing?

Adam Nams
25th Jan 2013, 02:14
Animated conversation around the dinner table renders them almost ineffective so she takes them out.

This device may be of some help:

http://ichabodsview.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/morse-code-operators.jpg

I have noticed a slight deterioration in my hearing and on seeing a specialist was told that there was a 'conduction problem' (ie the three little bones starting to 'stick'). I think that my hearing is better on the left than on the right, so always walk to starboard of Mrs Nams.

Have also had tinitus, but mercyfully only for short periods. You have my sympathy.

arcniz
25th Jan 2013, 03:12
Interesting to feel so much at home among the old gits... don't see so many in the day-to-day, oblivious youths under 50 instead.

Tinnitus has been a problem off & on for many a year, coming & going somewhat predictably with variations in aircraft, tools, weapons and loud companions.

Lately none of the above apply much but it still does sometimes come on quite loud and tenacious. The most likely source of irritation seems to be an office area where I spend chunks of time that is filled with a great many kinds and pieces of electronic equipment for computing, measuring, designing, etc. All of those seem quiet enough, but I am beginning to suspect the electronic switching power supplies - quite many of them - all running along at moderate power levels chopping energy into ultrasonic-size chunks for regulating voltage and current, may be resonating and doing symphonies in the 30khz to 100khz audio range and thus playing havoc with the old ears..

Wearing noise-cancelling headphones in what seems to be a quiet room has significant effect, which lingers afterward, even though temporary.

Does anyone else have similar experience or some insight about this as a possible cause for T-itis?

Loose rivets
25th Jan 2013, 04:58
I spent ages trying to cure tinnitus. I used my prototype piano string-ringer to send magnetic pulses at me brain. All known audio frequencies, but all to no avail.

It's been extra bad just lately, but the worst moment was at about age 40 being told 'there is no treatment for tinnitus.' One was a teensy bit upset about that.

What is odd is the improvement I get if I cup my hands over my ears. It's astonishing. Not the tinnitus, but the general 'sorting' of higher frequencies.

Apropos the bloke above, there was a patent submission in Victorian time of a headset with two hand-sized brass bowls cupped over the lugs. Surprisingly, it failed as an invention.

Interesting thought about the emf in a room. Mine has been worse while I'm spending 6 hours a day editing rather than general DIY and the like.

david1300
25th Jan 2013, 05:25
Why is it so quiet in here? Can't you please speak up a little?

I remember watching my Dads hearing deteriorate, and am now aware that I show similar tendencies. Crowded rooms (cocktail parties, etc) are the worst for me. Fortunately I can't hear the suggestions that I do something about it.

RedhillPhil
25th Jan 2013, 09:14
Brings to mind the old joke about the yoof in a railway compartment chewing gum whilst sitting opposite a little old lady. After three or four minutes she leans to-wards him and shouts,
"It's pointless talking to me, I'm stone deaf".

Takan Inchovit
25th Jan 2013, 09:21
I'm learning to lip read, trouble is the eyesight is diminishing and I get slapped if I try to hear 'by feel'. The pain receptors are working OK though. :\

Rossian
25th Jan 2013, 09:25
.....one great aid SWMBO has found is a wireless headset which has a small transmitter plugged into the headphone jack on the TV. She has independent volume control on the headset and, if I'm not there mute the TV. If I'm watching as well I can have the set volume at a comfortable level for me. Win win. She also uses a headset for Skype.

THe Ancient Mariner

ricardian
25th Jan 2013, 09:34
Three years ago the ENT specialist tested my hearing and asked if I wanted a hearing aid for my right ear. At first I said "no" but after a few months changed my mind. Brilliant NHS digital hearing aid made a big difference. I had to have an MRI scan as deafness in just one ear might just indicate other problems. No problem was found and 18 months later I had a hearing aid for my left ear. As someone remarked earlier they don't cure deafness, they just make life a little easier.

radeng
25th Jan 2013, 10:25
Binaural aids are now around, with a radio link between the two ears. They are available certainly in the 'in ear canal' type and also, I believe, in the 'BTE' ( behind the ear) type.

Interesting that during the aircraft safety briefing they say all electronic apparatus must be switched off. Two exceptions have to be pacemakers and hearing aids!

I have somewhere an email from the CAA, concluding that the frequency and low power mean they are safe for use on aircraft. There is a problem however in that the frequencies for Europe and the US are different, and they don't work with a mobile 'phone against the lug'ole - although I believe few Assisted Listening Devices, as they are officially termed, do.

Cochlear implants are a different ball game, though.

27mm
25th Jan 2013, 10:53
Radeng,

You're spot on re the BTE aids with a mobile phone; I have to hold the mobile behind the top of my ear to enable the aid to hear it; this has two disadvantages: firstly, it makes it harder for the dude on the other end of the line to hear me, as my mobile's mike is quite far away from my mouth. Secondly, folk nearby start staring at me, thinking no doubt "why is that jerk holding a mobile to the back of his head?":uhoh:

seacue
25th Jan 2013, 11:10
My BTE hearing aid has an inductive pickup for telephone use. One can switch between inductive and the normal microphone input.

Some lecture halls have inductive loops around the room which work with the hearing aid in the "Telephone" mode. They are fed by the PA system and their hardware cost is rather low.

One of the "Reverends" at the local senior living apartments paid for the electronics of the loop system in the chapel and in a large lecture hall out of his own pocket.

Loose rivets
29th Jan 2013, 04:10
Rowan Atkinson - Not the Nine O'Clock News Deaf Telephone Sketch - YouTube


Say no more . . . there'd be no point anyway.:p

M.Mouse
29th Jan 2013, 22:53
When I first joined BA and flying the early B737 we had very flimsy Sennheiser headsets with absolutely no ambient noise attenuation. The tradition, and I think it was on all fleets, was that the captain wore his headset with the left earpiece covering the left ear and the right perched behind the ear. The FO wore his headset in the reverse sense. Conversation between pilots was by shouting at each other (despite a serviceable intercom being fitted) and ATC communication was received in the respective ear with the headset earpiece.

Roll forward a few years when it became apparent that ambient cockpit noise levels were high enough to cause damage over time and BA introduced, fleetwide, Active Noise Reduction headsets and decreed that intercom should be used for interpilot comms. I remember several statements from the copious amount written during this change. One was that to hear radio transmissions clearly without an ANR headset and wearing the old headset 'one ear off' meant that radio volume had to be in the order of 10dB above ambient noise levels to be able to hear clearly. Another was that on the B747 airflow across the outside of the cockpit just above each pilots head was almost supersonic and a large contributor to the high ambient noise level on the flight deck of that aircraft. The final thing I remember was that hearing loss could be shown in significant numbers of pilots in the ear that was used for listening to radio transmissions. In my case I have some hearing looss in my right ear (I was an FO up until the introduction of the ANR headsets).

Even so a good many pilots, captains and FOs simply refused to use the new procedure and would use the very expensive ANR headsets in the same way as the old headsets. I didn't, I have always been very protective of my hearing and always wear earplugs in nightclubs and at live concerts! I also annoyed quite a few captains (and FOs when I became a captain) by my insistence to communicate via intercom because I appreciated the ability of the ANR headset to dramatically reduce the ambient noise levels enabling me to reduce the radio and intercom volumes to much reduced and less harmful levels.

Recently I had a left ear infection which dramatically affected my hearing. It is still not right and coupled withy my slight hearing loss in my right ear my aural acuity is much reduced.

I have always felt a degree of sympathy for people with hearing problems due to the difficulties they experience in noisy environments in hearing what people say to them. I also despise the increasing, in fact almost universal, tendency to add noise in the form of electronic beat or muzak over things like sports results in the absurd belief that it somehow makes them more exciting.

Ditto canned muzak in DIY stores, supermarkets and other quite inappropriate places.

Radar66
29th Jan 2013, 23:26
However there is a certain "green" person in JB who can speak with a large degree of authority on this subject and she can probably add more sense to this discussion than the rest of us put together (although her appearances in these hallowed halls have been sadly reduced of late, sadly because she usually has something sensible to say).

Rossian… Thank you. (I’m still oft around, and reading in.)


The ones my wife has are very dinky and invisible (hidden under her hair) but as the detectors are at the back of the units, by necessity, they are better at picking up things behind her rather than face to face. Animated conversation around the dinner table renders them almost ineffective so she takes them out. Sometimes the degree of mutual non comprehension with a couple of her friends, who also wear them, is slightly amusing to others but is very frustrating for them.

Hasten ye her back to her audiologist and get him/her to explain to your wife about ‘directional microphones’. Wearing her hair down over her aids can also have a muffling effect on incoming sounds. If she can operate better with them out, she probably doesn’t wear powerful enough aids, but the audiologist can obviously advise better than I can.

Tinnitus I’m afraid, but selfishly thankful, I cannot advise on. Apologies.


.....one great aid SWMBO has found is a wireless headset which has a small transmitter plugged into the headphone jack on the TV. She has independent volume control on the headset and, if I'm not there mute the TV. If I'm watching as well I can have the set volume at a comfortable level for me. Win win. She also uses a headset for Skype

I have similar, operated via Bluetooth. Yes, Bluetooth gizmos can find my aids, most amusing! Subtitles are a boon though, and according to the Wholigan, it is amazing how quickly you get used to them, plus the added humour of when they get it horribly HORRIBLY wrong!!!

Binaural aids are now around, with a radio link between the two ears. They are available certainly in the 'in ear canal' type and also, I believe, in the 'BTE' ( behind the ear) type.

Sure are radeng. Most disconcerting at first, but you soon get used to it.

You're spot on re the BTE aids with a mobile phone; I have to hold the mobile behind the top of my ear to enable the aid to hear it; this has two disadvantages: firstly, it makes it harder for the dude on the other end of the line to hear me, as my mobile's mike is quite far away from my mouth. Secondly, folk nearby start staring at me, thinking no doubt "why is that jerk holding a mobile to the back of his head?"

27mm - Frankly, who the hell cares what other people think?! Whatever works for you, go for it. However, if your aids are able to, you can wear an induction loop which negates the need for you to hold your phone to your ear – it works a bit like those iphone ear pieces – you have a mike around your chest area that you can use to talk into, and move up closer to your mouth if necessary, and the induction loop transfers incoming sounds from the phone to your ear – your phone can be in your pocket, on your desk, anywhere where the loop can plug into it. Go back to your audiologist and discuss this with him/her.

My BTE hearing aid has an inductive pickup for telephone use. One can switch between inductive and the normal microphone input.

Some lecture halls have inductive loops around the room which work with the hearing aid in the "Telephone" mode. They are fed by the PA system and their hardware cost is rather low.

One of the "Reverends" at the local senior living apartments paid for the electronics of the loop system in the chapel and in a large lecture hall out of his own pocket.

Spot on Seacue.

Just to confirm what Rossian said earlier, I am deaf.

In fact, I am VERY deaf. Have been since birth, worsening between birth and late teens/early twenties. Now my hearing has 'levelled off' and should remain reasonably stable until I naturally get 'senile deafness' in my dotage.

I have already advised a number of ppruners privately and in public. I think it would be fair to say that those I've pointed in the direction of an audiologist have generally been very happy with the results they've experienced. No, hearing aids will not bring back the crystal clear clarity of your yoof, but they WILL better the situation you are presently in if that is the route that is best for you. If you have any questions it is far far better to go to an audiologist - either the NHS, a high street one, or a Harley Street one, than to sweep random forums for answers that are most likely not suited to your individual needs.

I confess that I bankrupt myself by going to the top audiologist in the country, but in my mind and experience, it is worth it. I have met a number of people on the same level of deafness as me and they are 'deaf'. 'Deaf' as in 'handicapped'. Thanks to my audiologist, I am merely 'deaf', NOT handicapped. I've a number of 'real life' ppruner friends who I am sure will validate this for you having met me, some of whom know me well, eh Wholigan??!! :E

Now, next question?! :}

Wholigan
29th Jan 2013, 23:33
The strangest thing is that she seems to have no difficulty hearing the stuff I'd rather she didn't hear!!! Typical bleedin' woman! :E

Radar66
30th Jan 2013, 00:09
And your problem is?! :p

I had a memory of posting in here on the subject of aids before, so after a quick search THIS (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/421959-hearing-aids.html) thread came up with a number of posts by yours truly that still have bearing today.

And further back still I posted THIS (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/319546-really-really-boring-totally-pointless-snippets-information-thread-mk-xi-293.html#post4352862) post.

And further back still, I think THIS (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/290437-okay-laugh-about-handicapped-jokes.html#post3516885) was the first post I stated the extent of my deafness in.

WPW
30th Jan 2013, 10:09
your first call should be the NHS, they issue some very good digital aids at no cost. only if this fails should you think of paying.
note 50% of getting good results is having a well fitting ear mould.

Argonautical
30th Jan 2013, 10:22
Make absolutely sure that before your appointment with the audiologist that your ears are clear of wax. If not, they won't take the ear impressions for the moulds and you will have wasted an appointment. Also, I have found, with my mother, that the moulds are crucial.

Radar66
30th Jan 2013, 11:02
Yes, that would be the obvious first step, to ensure your ears are clean and debris free before you cry 'deaf'. :hmm:

Most good audiologists will clean your ears for you if they are not too drastic.

However if you do it yourself, you MUST clean your ears properly... that is to say, NOT with a cotton bud rammed down the ear - this just has the effect of pushing the residue wax down the ear channel and stacking it up in a hard plug against the ear drum - counter effective to say the least! And not good for your ears generally.

To start with, there are a range of liquid ear cleansers amongst other products from all high street chemists. If this fails then its the good old syringe and kidney dish method done by a professional.

14SIX785
10th Feb 2013, 10:05
Years ago, whilst waiting for an audio test in Oxford's Radcliffe Infirmary, I was much amused to see a notice which stated ' If you are waiting for new batteries for your hearing aid, please wait for your name to be called'!!!:rolleyes:
Hope nobody was still waiting when they demolished the Infirmary some years back!!

Loose rivets
10th Feb 2013, 17:42
There's an ad on telly here in Texas that shows a sensible looking man poking his ear with a cotton bud. He recoils sideways across the room in obvious agony.

They then go on to show you their Wax Vac. Yep, a little vacuum to hoick out the goo. If you hurry, you can get two for $10.

I liked Joey Tribbiani in Friends - well, when Chandler said the wise words to him. "when you feel resistance, stop."

As a guest old-person at my son's university, when told not to use the cotton but method, I replied in front of several pretty audiologist students, "oh no! It's one of the few pleasures I have left."

No wonder my son is hesitant to have me meet other professors.:hmm:

mike-wsm
10th Feb 2013, 18:18
I can relate to the cotton bud method, very pleasurable, followed by a few drops of, er, eardrops to remove those final few microns of wax deposits. Sometimes the buds extract so much dark, sticky wax that I am loth to throw it away. It is similar to the wax they used to use to coat condensers. Or...I wonder... can you spread it on bread in place of honey?

Always be cautious around very rich people who are hard of hearing. Our Gordon is so rich he bought one of those dab radio things, he uses it to listen to the beeb...on fm. Anyway, he bought a deaf aid, money no object, with all sorts of radio-linked attatchments, including a conference microphone which he puts in the middle of the table so he can hear us all. Very trusting, leaves it there when he goes out of the room. So take care, Gordon can hear every word you say behind his back....

27mm
11th Feb 2013, 09:02
A while ago, they had a jolly chap on the telly who collected his earwax and used it as furniture polish.......:yuk:

Firestorm
11th Feb 2013, 14:09
in my dotage

You're not there yet? You had me fooled! :eek:

tony draper
11th Feb 2013, 14:13
NIL lashed out on a posh new digital one that cost 1800 quid,then they lashed out on a Cocker Spaniel Pup that didn't cost that much but said Pup found said posh hearing aid,need one say more.
:uhoh:

sisemen
11th Feb 2013, 14:41
I prefer the hair grip method (kirby grip to the cousins). One can get a satisfying amount of gunge out with one of them. :}

Cornish Jack
11th Feb 2013, 18:25
Causes of tinnitus? Try an ENT Specialist!!!:mad:
A few years back went to (then) local clinic (Surrey) for ear cleaning. Nurse made a bit of a Horlicks of it and left some impacted debris. Got appointment to see 'Great Man' and on appointed day was given his treatment with a microscope aided de-waxer. On completion, intermittent right ear deafness had gone ... to be replaced by CONSTANT tinnitus!! Explained condition to GM, to be advised that it 'was just one of those things' and that I 'should learn to live with it'.
Isn't professional expertise truly wonderful!!:yuk: