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imnotaxdodger
15th Jan 2013, 14:44
Apologies if this has been mentioned before.

If I am on an overseas contract and my partner is a UK resident, living in the UK, is she/he liable for tax, on say 1500 per month deposited to her/his UK bank account from abroad, over a period of say 4 years?? This sum could be in addition to a pension.

Any advice would be appreciated, before I consult H.M.R.C.

Thanks

I.N.T.D

Ancient Observer
15th Jan 2013, 17:01
That's just not enough info for a full comment..
The HMRC bods will want to know the exact source of the money, purpose, and so on, and will dig deep in to this relationship. Partner does not have legal standing in the world of the taxman.
The bankers with their off-shore EBT's making "loans" to employees have made the nice people at the Revenue be rather hot on mysterious foreign sources of money.

Checkboard
15th Jan 2013, 17:06
Is the 1500 a gift, or income from employment, or something else?

For instance, if it is a redundancy payment - then there is a 30,000 allowance, if it is a capital gain, there is a 10,600 allowance etc etc

OFSO
15th Jan 2013, 18:26
UK bank account

Mainland or CI ?

Temp Spike
15th Jan 2013, 21:45
If your "pardner" is the same sex as you, then tax is thrice the normal amount in order to pay for additional medical care....I have heard.

funfly
15th Jan 2013, 21:53
"my partner is a UK resident, living in the UK, is she/he ..."
Don't you know?

Temp Spike
15th Jan 2013, 21:56
Funfly

BWAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.....SPIT....COUGH....BWAAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHAHAHA---->INFINITY AND BEYOND!

imnotaxdodger
15th Jan 2013, 22:28
Well that took 6 hours since posting. I did wonder how long it would take someone to pickup on the he/she. HAHA!!

I'll tell you why I don't know. He/she is in the process of corrective surgery, so even I don't know yet. HAHA!!!

Thanks for the sensible info guys/gals.

You 2 above are a pack of bitches!! :yuk:

OFSO, from abroad, outside the EU to a mainland UK.

We are now going to get married. Will that make any difference, for tax purposes?

doubleu-anker
16th Jan 2013, 14:56
Try this:

Ask Experts & Get Answers to Your Questions - ASAP (http://www.justanswer.com)

I am a subscriber, to this site, so i get all the responses I want for the monthly fee I give them

Their answer is, you don't have too. FWIW.

I am sure though HMRC would find away to get their hands on a good percentage of that amount.

PS, If you didn't have to pay tax on money sent from abroad, what would stop one from sending larger or the total remuneration, to their partners or wives?

cavortingcheetah
16th Jan 2013, 18:04
The corrective surgery is apt to be applied by HMRC to delinquents of all shades of gray.
There are certainly four immediate issues of concern here.
Income tax in your hands on the money from which the gift arose.
Income tax on the money in the hands of the beneficiary.
Inheritance tax on the combined amounts in your estate in terms of the seven year rule.
Your UK residence status in the eyes of HMRC.
1,500 a month for four years adds up to 72,000 and the potential tax take, penalties and interest on that amount might mightily deplete such a handsome sum. It must be worth be worth spending 250 for an hour's worth of a decent accountant's time. Could you have, for example, afforded the largesse mentioned without incurring a reduction in your own life style?
I am sure that the matter can be dealt with by a decent accountant in a perfectly straightforward fashion.

cdtaylor_nats
17th Jan 2013, 08:18
Change your last name to Starbucks and offer them 30 per year.

AlpineSkier
17th Jan 2013, 09:30
My take on this would be that if you were previously living together and supporting him/her or paying into a joint account/expenses-pot and now continue to do the same, then this should be of no interest to HMRC. In this case their only concern should be if you had any tax to pay after paying taxes where you are earning.

As everyone else says however, your situation touches on several areas, but ought to be clear to the ordinary intelligent person who has some knowledge of tax affairs e.g. filling out a Self-Assessment form or reading the notes thereto .

Fitter2
17th Jan 2013, 09:40
This whole thread has much wider implications than tax law. However, as the well known fantasy anthropologist points out, even dwarfs have difficulty determing the gender of another dwarf, and I suspect the same applies to trolls.