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View Full Version : JETSTAR ASIA'S profit falls 80 per cent last financial year


TIMA9X
15th Jan 2013, 13:38
http://images.smh.com.au/2013/01/15/3954944/dan-20130115194306658362-620x349.jpg
Cost challenge ... rising fuel and operating expenditure has hit Jetstar Asia. Photo: Reuters

JETSTAR ASIA'S profit fell 80 per cent last financial year as the Singapore-based budget airline faced a bigger fuel bill and tough competition.
Despite Qantas touting Jetstar Asia as the ''most profitable and best low-cost network based in Singapore'', accounts recently lodged with Singaporean regulators show that the airline is still struggling to post strong results eight years after it was established in the city-state.
The documents reveal that Jetstar Asia posted a profit of $S4.37 million ($3.36 million) for the year to June, down from $S22.47 million a year earlier.
Jetstar Asia has faced tough competition from its main rival, Malaysian budget airline AirAsia, as well as from the Singapore Airlines-backed Tiger Airways and Scoot.

Revenue from passengers and cargo rose 48 per cent to $S473 million for the year, while other income derived primarily from sub-leasing planes increased slightly to almost $S44 million.
But Jetstar Asia's fuel bill rose to $S214 million, from $S128 million previously, while its aircraft operating costs also rose 29 per cent. The airline's fleet increased by four A320s to 16 during the year, which partly explains the increase in its fuel bill.
Qantas did not disclose the bottom-line performance of Jetstar Asia when it released its annual results in August, instead highlighting a 38 per cent boost in the offshoot's capacity and improvement in unit costs.
The latest accounts show Jetstar Asia's accumulated losses stood at $S67 million as at June 30.

Although its liabilities exceeded its assets by $S9 million, Jetstar Asia said its accounts had been prepared on the basis of it as a going concern because its holding company, Newstar Investments, had ''undertaken to provided continuing financial support''.
Qantas has a 49 per cent stake in Jetstar Asia's holding company while Dennis Choo, a Singaporean businessman and long-time Qantas associate, has the remainder.

The Singapore airline has been Qantas' biggest investment in the low-cost aviation market in Asia.

Jetstar's other longest established affiliate, Jetstar Pacific, has not turned a profit since Qantas bought a cornerstone stake in it in 2007. Vietnam Airlines is the other shareholder.
Jetstar Pacific is considering launching its first international routes from Vietnam this year.

Jetstar also began a joint venture in Japan last year, and hopes to begin a budget offshoot in Hong Kong by the middle of this year. The latter still requires regulatory approval.

Read more: Jetstar Asia profit hit by fuel bills, competition (http://www.smh.com.au/business/jetstar-asia-profit-hit-by-fuel-bills-competition-20130115-2crhv.html#ixzz2I3QolFLi)

my bold Looks like AJs baby may become a problematic child for his strategy at Qantas group.

The spin doctors at Q will be working overtime tonight me thinks...

one25six
15th Jan 2013, 14:19
What they need is a VLCC. Something like, Jetstar Express, or Jetstar Lite...

DrPepz
15th Jan 2013, 15:53
And Alan Joyce says that QF Intl can't return the cost of capital? How interesting. Also why does 3K have S$44 mil of leasing revenue? Who is giving them the planes and who are they leasing them to? If not for this leasing revenue their losses would have been SGD40 mil. Very oh dear.

Keg
15th Jan 2013, 19:35
Interesting too that those sub leasing costs increased slightly. I wonder by how much? By at least $4.037 million would be my guess.

Sunfish
15th Jan 2013, 19:36
Told Yer so.

ALAEA Fed Sec
15th Jan 2013, 19:59
Anyone got a link to the document this article refers to?

schlong hauler
15th Jan 2013, 20:32
Jetstar Asia profit hit by fuel bills, competition (http://www.smh.com.au/business/jetstar-asia-profit-hit-by-fuel-bills-competition-20130115-2crhv.html)Jetstar doubts fuelled by Singapore figures | Plane Talking (http://blogs.crikey.com.au/planetalking/2013/01/16/jetstar-doubts-fuelled-by-singapore-figures/)

Deception and lies from the CEO with the backing of the board. Is Alan going to confess all with Oprah? How much longer do we have to endure this ineptitude?
Burning thousands of tonnes of fuel per year to sell muffins or spring rolls. The smartest guys in the room are starting to look dumber and dumber.
The really sad thing is that those within the industry always knew it was a con and yet the reality is only now being published in mainstream media. Surely Shirley cant last much longer. On yer bike Alan and stop experimenting in real time based on a flawed thesis. It aint working and your credibility is at rock bottom.

ALAEA Fed Sec
15th Jan 2013, 20:35
I did read the article. It was the documents refered to in red that I'd be interested seeing.


Despite Qantas touting Jetstar Asia as the ''most profitable and best low-cost network based in Singapore'', accounts recently lodged with Singaporean regulators show that the airline is still struggling to post strong results eight years after it was established in the city-state.

Mud Skipper
15th Jan 2013, 20:38
Similar article by Mat O'Sullivan in the Age BusinessDay page 19.

27/09
15th Jan 2013, 20:41
DrPepz
Also why does 3K have S$44 mil of leasing revenue? Who is giving them the planes and who are they leasing them to? If not for this leasing revenue their losses would have been SGD40 mil. Very oh dear.

I cannot be bothered looking thru all the figures but I strongly suspect there is also leasing costs or capital costs associated with the aircraft being leased out by J*A. The $44 mil of leasing revenue isn't all profit so to say that without the lease income the loss would have been $40 mil isn't quite on the mark.

However it's probably a fair guess to say that the leasing income contributed significantly to the 4 mill profit.

my oleo is extended
15th Jan 2013, 21:40
The bottom line is irrelevant. The company still churns out executive bonuses, retention and sign-on bonuses and other ditties. Plus, those 'leasing arrangements' for a number of services also create a nice little income for selected individuals. Indeed there is a whole new world out there that the plebs (or shareholders) don't get to see or taste.

Wake up kiddies, the days of corporate values and company profitability went out in the 90's. Its now about creating a quick shitty company, extracting quick easy money, quickly spinning a story when the turd loses its gloss and then quickly exiting stage left at the right time with pockets brimming with cash..

Shark Patrol
15th Jan 2013, 22:15
But Jetstar is such an amaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaazing business!!!!

wheels_down
15th Jan 2013, 23:09
They are operating on a signifanctly higher cost base than Tiger and AirAsia, yet they are forced to charge the same or less to fill seats. They are running SIN-KUL shuttles at 30% capacity after they added 400% capacity to this route late last year.

Even Tiger Singapore had a way below average year but they still managed $4m profit in Q1 FY13 and $5m in Q2.

my oleo is extended
15th Jan 2013, 23:38
You can't polish a turd.

flyingfrenchman
16th Jan 2013, 01:00
And all the glitter has worn off!!!

DrPepz
16th Jan 2013, 01:01
ALAEA Fed Sec

To get Jetstar Asia's accounts, go to:

Accounting and Corporate Regulatory Authority Singapore (http://www.acra.gov.sg)

On the left, click on "buy information"

Scroll to the bottom of the page to "Extracts"

Search entity name "Jetstar Asia"

Then click on "Jetstar Asia" and choose

"Transaction Date" Last One Year
"Added value information" Financial Information
"Certification Required" Choose Yes

The first item returned will be

Annual Return by Local Company For Financial Year Ending 30/06/2012 (With Accounts)

Then follow the prompts and register, and the information is available for free. Either through post, or you can get someone to collect it in person.

Wheels Down - I am surprised that Jetstar decided to increase SINKUL from 17 weekly to 56 weekly. They regularly charge SGD28 one way with tax. The tax is SGD28 so the fares more often than not are between $0 and $10. The credit charge of $16 costs more than the fare. And not like anyone's going to be buying chicken rice for $12 for a 30 min flight.

TIMA9X
16th Jan 2013, 02:46
SZuq4q4ZFho

Good to revisit this story from the ABC Nov 14-2011 a classic case of déjà vu

Mstr Caution
16th Jan 2013, 12:30
Does anyone know if the return of the JQ A330's to QF are dates set in concrete?

busdriver007
16th Jan 2013, 17:09
Ask Boeing...?:ok:

blueloo
16th Jan 2013, 20:45
"You can't polish a turd....."


Not so sure about that. Those Mythbuster guys spent half an episode polishing a turd till it was very shiny! :}

ejectx3
16th Jan 2013, 21:32
AmaaaAAAAAAAaaaaaazzIng business

training wheels
16th Jan 2013, 23:03
They regularly charge SGD28 one way with tax. The tax is SGD28 so the fares more often than not are between $0 and $10. The credit charge of $16 costs more than the fare. And not like anyone's going to be buying chicken rice for $12 for a 30 min flight.

Geesh, even the taxi fare to the airport costs more than that. So, is that Jetstar Asia's business strategy then? Sell cheap fares but make their money on the add-ons? If so, why not just setup a chicken rice stall at Changi?

Mstr Caution
16th Jan 2013, 23:10
Bus driver 007

My point exactly. My understanding was QF are relying on the return of the A330's as part of the business plan to better serve the Australian West Coast & improve the inflight offering to destinations like HNL & Asia.

After the grounding if the 787, my best guess as to what business unit will suffer is the mainline :(

DrPepz
17th Jan 2013, 03:03
Just check the average SINKUL fares in Jan and Feb (excluding the Chinese New Year long weekend around 7 to 12 Feb). Most flights have a base fare of $0. Others are $2. the morning and evening peak flights are $10.

Jetstar Asia's Chicken Rice is SGD12. Tiger's is SGD10 (from the same caterer). Air Asia's is about SGD4 from their KUL caterer.

schlong hauler
17th Jan 2013, 20:22
So who really pays for the introduction of the 787 into J* Asia? How will they be able to sublease back to J* when they will not be operating them? How much will the introduction cost and how will it effect the bottom line? Given the margins are sooooo thin will chicken with rice be enough to keep them out of the red. Fuel savings will easily be diluted with the inevitable delays always associated with a new type and the unresolved tech issues which are becoming obvious. The grounding of the 787 fleet worldwide does not bode well for J* Asia's acceptance of line number 123 788 airframe in September/October this year. I also note that the assembly number data shows VH registration. Don't know if this just an assumption based on the parent company being Australian or for some other reason. Can the aircraft be registered in OZ and be flown by J* Asia based in Singapore?

73to91
18th Jan 2013, 02:13
Jet* Asia, Jet * Australia, Jet * International, Jet * Domestic, it doesn't matter. I find all of the threads interesting but keep wondering, who is responsible for keeping these airlines flying?

Then, I was reading about Rio Tinto and could not help but think of QF, the CEO and the board. just replace the company names and the CEO's names and it does make you wonder.

Well, colour me surprised. A mining company that favoured scale over discretion has got itself into trouble by overpaying – again.


The company in question – and in the headlines – is Rio Tinto (ASX: RIO), which has lost its chief executive, Tom Albanese, by "mutual agreement" with the board.


We don't know how the conversation went down, but you can imagine there weren't a lot of words necessary when as chief executive you recommended that the board approve the second multi-billion-dollar write-down in quick time.


My guess is that Albanese was already mentally preparing to pack up his office and clean out his desk before he even finalised the numbers.


(How boards of directors manage to survive when chief executives are dumped is something of a modern mystery. They approve the company strategy and large acquisitions, after all, so the buck stops also with them.)

When bad news is good news


Ironically, Rio Tinto's share price opened up a couple of percentage points this morning – likely because investors were happy that the problem wasn't worse.
Read more: Rio's wake-up call for investors (http://www.smh.com.au/business/rios-wakeup-call-for-investors-20130118-2cxm4.html#ixzz2IIESSqnx)

Mstr Caution
18th Jan 2013, 08:20
The chess board pieces are a changing.

Will be interesting to see how Jetstar Hong Kong goes with Hong Kong Express' transformation to a LCC. Last I heard was HKE will get 15 * A320's to go up against CX & the yet to be approved JQ HKG.

No doubt JQ HKG will also be an ammaaaaazing business. :}

busdriver007
18th Jan 2013, 19:26
Jetstar Hong Kong's approval is on hold awaiting direction from Beijing...Which means let us get 2 airlines up and running and then we will give you the scraps...How dumb is this crowd running Jetstar...Everyone in Asia want them to come their way so they can skin them alive....

Mstr Caution
19th Jan 2013, 02:09
A colleague informed me this morning of the "rumour" appropriate cost allocation has been happening the last 6 months.

Seems the new QF International & Domestic CEO's Hickey & Strambie aren't prepared to wear the costs of Jetstar.

Combined that with rumours AIPA were talking to Institutional Investors about cost allocation.

Enter Hrdlicka. The "fall guy" who was "surprised" at the offer of the JQ CEO position.

Cue. JQ Asia's profit fall & AJ's promise of turning QF International around. :suspect:

The The
19th Jan 2013, 03:00
Seems the new QF International & Domestic CEO's Hickey & Strambie aren't prepared to wear the costs of Jetstar.

The battle for the next top job has begun! AJ being white anted?

angryrat
19th Jan 2013, 11:53
Interesting stuff.

The fuel bill raises the eyebrows. The fleet size increased by 33% to 16 aircraft. The fuel bill, if it increased by 33%, would be $170m. Now that is a $44m shortfall from the $214m.

Oh wait, I've heard that $44m figure before??? Now where is it? Something about leases? Coincidence?

TIMA9X
30th May 2013, 09:39
By Mstr Caution The chess board pieces are a changing.

Will be interesting to see how Jetstar Hong Kong goes with Hong Kong Express' transformation to a LCC. Last I heard was HKE will get 15 * A320's to go up against CX & the yet to be approved JQ HKG.

No doubt JQ HKG will also be an ammaaaaazing business.Interesting piece from Andrew Pyne via plane talking regarding J*'s HK progress.


Jetstar Hong Kong, waiting, waiting ... | Plane Talking (http://blogs.crikey.com.au/planetalking/2013/05/30/jetstar-hong-kong-waiting-waiting/)By Andrew Pyne
Dealing with the mosaic of different regulatory environments that constitute the Asian aviation scene has been a challenge for the region’s low cost carriers: by contrast the likes of Southwest and Ryanair have grown up in a single aviation environment, not having to worry about bilateral traffic rights and securing cross border designations.

The chosen model for Asia’s most successful LCCs has been to deal with regulatory barriers to market entry by cross border establishment: Tiger, Air Asia and Jetstar have all pursued this route with varying degrees of success. In Jetstar’s case for every Singapore there has been a Vietnam: undoubted success followed by relative failure. Nonetheless, just over a year ago the markets and the media reacted warmly to Jetstar’s efforts to establish a Hong Kong offshoot.

Those who suggested, firstly, that the plan was incompatible with Hong Kong’s much cherished aviation autonomy and secondly, that in any event Hong Kong was the wrong base from which to penetrate the China market were in a small minority with our views largely dismissed: Qantas had done its homework and in any case China Eastern was on hand to lend some muscle if the door stuck on its hinges.

I hold no ill will towards either Qantas or Jetstar but as someone who worked hard to buttress Hong Kong’s aviation autonomy during the 1990s, it does give me some satisfaction to see that the current generation of Hong Kong civil servants are not quite the pushover that Mr Joyce and his acolytes at Jetstar initially imagined them to be.

Hong Kong’s aviation autonomy didn’t fall from the skies: it was the product of many years of patient negotiation between Britain and China; followed by many more years of patient negotiation with Hong Kong’s aviation partners who all needed reassurance that the then very novel Incorporation and Principal Place of Business (IPPB) designation formula would not be exploited as an aviation flag of convenience. To its great credit Australia was the first aviation partner to sign an agreement with Hong Kong. The irony of the Australian flag carrier being the first to seriously try and exploit the position will not be lost on this readership!

As a projected early 2013 launch now slides into a late 2013 launch, three things are apparent: first that Qantas and Jetstar did not do their homework; secondly that betting on China Eastern in an Air China dominated region was neither a smart nor a well-informed move and thirdly, that QF now need someone or something to help them escape from this mess with face intact.

Too late now I suspect to mend fences with Cathay Pacific, and by proxy with Air China: CX was reportedly ‘furious’ over what they viewed as Mr Joyce’s duplicity over the original announcement; apparently reassuring CX seniors that QF had no intent to get involved in low cost in Hong Kong just days before the public announcement. They are now no doubt enjoying watching Alan Joyce squirm. There are however other potential partners: Hong Kong Airlines, which has often talked about its low cost aspirations could be one, although probably as a substitute for China Eastern rather than alongside it.

And there are of course a plethora of local non airline partners to consider. It does however seem certain that the new airline if and when it finally emerges from the chrysalis will not be styled ‘Jetstar Hong Kong’ but will carry a distinctively local branding and will be constrained as to what it can do in terms of integration into and commerce with the rest of the QF/JQ family.
A stand alone Hong Kong LCC is far from the original plan unveiled last year but by the same token the strategic logic behind choosing Hong Kong as a base for low cost operations in China was always fundamentally flawed. If it made sense to set up an LCC in Hong Kong to serve the China market you can bet that Cathay Pacific or a local tycoon – or even a Tony Fernandes – would have seized the opportunity a long time ago.

Hong Kong is one of the most expensive airports in the world: who would for example base a European LCC at Heathrow? Hong Kong/Mainland China traffic rights are not truly domestic: their regulation is akin to a bilateral relationship: who would base an Australian focused LCC in Port Moresby? And finally in choosing Hong Kong as a base Qantas in effect declared war on Cathay Pacific and Air China, two powerful and influential enemies: neatly killing two birds with one stone and at the same time severely undermining the cohesion of the oneworld alliance.

A year ago I suggested that it was time for Mr Joyce to go back to the drawing board: that now seems unlikely to happen. Somehow, and in a very different shape and form to that originally conceived, this project will limp through the starting gate. The question that Qantas shareholders might be asking themselves is whether, with all the compromises entailed and the rancour induced, this particular game was worth the candle.

V-Jet
31st May 2013, 00:58
The answer is simple guys, and just so obvious.

There is a clear need for a Group Manager Muffin Sales with a department behind them to streamline a new onboard sales program. ('Muffin 2020')??

Muffin Sales must be increased, and this new team under (insert idiot here) will be instrumental in the entire Group's 'Turnaround Strategy To Profitability'.

I also should pay tribute to one25six's outstanding contribution. Clearly he and I are on the same page. It is this type of 'out of the box' management brilliance that will see the two of us with lifetime Charimans Club access and some really good bonuses:ok:

Nunc
31st May 2013, 10:49
Would an ex cap salesman/Milner (spellcheck) do as general manager muffin sales? Have someone in mind for that amaaaaaazing business Wendy works for.

V-Jet
31st May 2013, 11:49
Good questions for Ms AJ, Wendy....



1987 Federal Election - ALP Ads 12/18 - YouTube (http://youtu.be/VX5qnUR1UVg)

It's too good to ignore. Given 'Piggy' Howes affiliation with the glamorous Ms Wirth (Miss Piggy??) the jokes (and tragically the money theft) only get better - nice to point out...

Muffin Songs - The Muffin Man | nursery rhymes & children songs with lyrics | muffin songs - YouTube (http://youtu.be/A_7-6L_2MWg)

At heart, I am a small, simple, petty man who does seem to have some capacity for harboring grudges when these scum ruin my life's work...

PS: Unfortunately I have to inform the reader that whilst Group Profits (if I can arrogantly use that term) have dropped 80%, the 'wee man's' (Muffin Man) personal profit has increased 800%

PPS: Andy. The Milliner:) hehehehehe:):):) Perfect choice for Manager, Inflight Bakery Resources:)