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View Full Version : Dilbert's pointy-haired boss books with Ryanair...


ilesmark
14th Jan 2013, 10:39
The official Dilbert website with Scott Adams' color comic strips, animation, mashups and more! (http://dilbert.com/2013-01-13/)

seacue
14th Jan 2013, 10:57
It's more likely to be Spirit Airlines, the US firm which seems to out-Ryan Ryanair. They charge $100 for carry-ons in some situations. Also charge for boarding passes. etc etc .

Temp Spike
14th Jan 2013, 12:49
Yes, air travel now sucks beyond belief. When do we get our bullet trains?

con-pilot
14th Jan 2013, 16:46
When do we get our bullet trains?

Ask Jerry Brown. I think the cost of his is about ten million dollars a mile right now. :p
.
But you are 100 percent correct about airline travel today, it is simply terrible.

Gertrude the Wombat
14th Jan 2013, 22:39
Can anyone explain what "and it's only three stops" means? Not sure whether I'm having a language problem or a cultural problem or what.

"Three stops" sounds to me like the plane lands at other places three times before you get to where you want to. Surely there aren't any airline schedules like that - that'll take you round the world these days? What's she trying to say?

broadreach
14th Jan 2013, 23:13
Come ON Gertrude,

I can - theoretically, mind you - get from Sao Paulo to Abidjan with stops in Atlanta, New York and Paris, and for a total fare that's less than a direct flight, if in fact one exists. The Three Stops will involve FOUR different aircraft, with loads of time for tourism in between arrivals and departures - or not. With any overnights for my account, of course. That's because that wonderful revenue management software is superb at filling seats, no matter what the routing is. It quickly learns what your legroom requirements are, how many nappies you might have to change en route, whether you're a sucker for organic food and whether you usually travel alone, with your wife, significant other or mistress/boyfriend.

What Dilbert's pointy-haired boss's secretary has done is select all the extras before looking at the schedules, and I don't doubt the total would come up to what she's quoted!

Matari
14th Jan 2013, 23:52
I'm afraid Gertrude's little stroll down the path in the local dorp does not involve anything so complicated as air travel, or heathen foreigners, for that matter.

ricardian
14th Jan 2013, 23:56
Gertrude the Wombat said Can anyone explain what "and it's only three stops" means?
Loganair flights in the Northern Isles often have 2 or 3 stops when flying to/from Kirkwall

yotty
15th Jan 2013, 08:48
Jeeeez Temp, if we abandon the skies how on earth are we going to carry on with the "Chemtrails"??? :eek:

ExXB
15th Jan 2013, 09:12
On US domestic routes it was not unusual to have flights with multiple stops (even change of gauge). I recall NW had a flight (single flight number) with a routing something like SAN-LAX-MEM-MSP-BOS. In context of Dilbert this is likely a reference to one of these puddle-hoppers, which were/are well hated by everyone that took one!

In the US, where aircraft don't always fly out and back, but have a sequence of sectors you see this much more than in other markets. With limited availability of flight numbers the aircraft could keep the same flight number over multiple sectors for an entire day. The airline may not promote the origin-destination but selling you a one, or even two-stop in between is certainly possible.

Gertrude the Wombat
15th Jan 2013, 09:31
In the US, where aircraft don't always fly out and back, but have a sequence of sectors you see this much more than in other markets.
Thanks. We don't see much of such routes in Europe - it'd be quicker to take the train in many cases than take a flight which isn't non-stop, particularly after you've factored in the two hours for the security theatre and the fact that the train station is in the city centre, where you want to be, but the airport is another hour out.

ExXB
15th Jan 2013, 10:21
In the NW example that I gave I guess you could take the train SAN-LAX, but not any of the other sectors. I guess they were selling SAN-LAX more for connections rather than true O&D.