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ExSp33db1rd
13th Jan 2013, 05:12
Rant,

Why can’t ‘they’ leave things alone ? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Never wanted a cellphone, but was eventually forced to accept one as a result of my involvement with a volunteer Coastguard unit, but recently the Gummint shut down the old CDMA – whatever that meant - transmission system and forced us all to buy new phones that received the ‘revolutionary’ 3G network, doubtless to be eventually replaced again by 4G ?

A grateful public, through voluntary donations, replaced my old phone which was still working as designed until the signal vanished, but the hole into which the new charger fits is now a different size, 2mm v 3mm. Of course it came with its’ own charger unit, but the car charger I had bought myself for my own convenience is now no good and I have to buy another one. Grrrr ! What was wrong with a 3mm hole, the new phone is no thinner than the last ?

Also – Mrs. ExS’s recently acquired ‘new’ car has one of the computer gadgets that winks and blinks at me all the time, thereby distracting my gaze from the job in hand – i.e. keeping my eye on the road. I don’t need it. I don’t need to know that I have used fuel at the rate of 7.8 ltrs per 100 km to -day, on a longer trip than yesterday to the Post Office, where I used 10.3 ltrs per 100 km, I know that short trips are less efficient on fuel useage than longer ones at a steady speed. I don’t need to be told that every few minutes. I know that a heavy right foot will use more fuel than a lighter one, I don’t need to be mesmerised by a moving bar-graph of consumption per second thrust in my face.

Over the next few weeks I’ll record the petrol purchased an a piece of paper, and eventually use a slide rule to work out that – perhaps – I achieve a rate of 8.630 ltrs per 100 kms on average, which I will use for the rest of the life of the car, if I care ? I certainly don’t want to re-compute my brain every few seconds as I drive along.

And – why litres per 100 Kms ? Whatever happened to miles per gallon, or as we’ve gone metric, kilometres per litre ? I can understand that easily, doing it backwards makes no sense to me. Grrrr !

I know, I know, I can change the computer read out to something else, like average speed, or a view of how many seat belts have been fastened, but another gadget keeps beeping at me if anyone fails to buckle up anyway, which also annoys Mrs. ExS as she invariably undoes her belt as we go through our gate, then we have to put up with a beeping maniac until we get to the top of the drive !

I don't need ANY of it, if it ain't broke, don't fix it !!!

probes
13th Jan 2013, 05:59
ditto!! (except l per km which is ok with me).
If you organise a protest march, I'll be there.

radeng
13th Jan 2013, 06:38
CDMA = Code Division Multiple Access, and considered by many engineers as a complete con which brought a lot of money to a US company. The easiest mobile telephone system to completely jam.

4G. Described by one of the guys responsible for producing standards for it as 'needed to cover up all the c*ck-ups we made with 3G'.

Same with the removal of analogue FM broadcasting, plus the idiot gummint obviously haven't thought out the cost in trade imbalance caused by people having to buy new radios, all manufactured in the Far East.

Hydromet
13th Jan 2013, 06:56
Same with the removal of analogue FM broadcasting, plus the idiot gummint obviously haven't thought out the cost in trade imbalance caused by people having to buy new radios, all manufactured in the Far East.
And why does digital reception drop out regularly. Is there any reason whatsoever for dropping analogue that is beneficial to the consumer? If not, qui bono?

Muffin Themule
13th Jan 2013, 07:03
Mrs. ExS’s recently acquired ‘new’ car has one of the computer gadgets that winks and blinks at me all the time, thereby distracting my gaze from the job in hand
'Tis what masking tape was invented for.


but the hole into which the new charger fits is now a different size, 2mm v 3mm

Two minimal cost possibilities:
a. ream out the 2mm hole to 3mm, or
b. turn the 3mm jack down to 2mm

Temp Spike
13th Jan 2013, 07:45
What the hell is a, "volunteer Coastguard unit"? They are ALL volunteer.

This post smells funny to me.

Big Hammer
13th Jan 2013, 07:58
Excellent rant there.

AlpineSkier
13th Jan 2013, 08:32
What the hell is a, "volunteer Coastguard unit"? They are ALL volunteer.

Very silly statement TS. The UK Coastguard service is a full-time, paid job as is, I am certain, the US Coastguard plus the French, German, Dutch and many others.

@ExSp33

Somebody has pressurised the phone companies into producing a standard charger specification but they aren't there yet.

david1300
13th Jan 2013, 09:09
I'm sure there is a lot you have left out of your rant - it is NZ after all. The weather for one, the woeful performance of the cricket team . . .

hellsbrink
13th Jan 2013, 09:11
Somebody has pressurised the phone companies into producing a standard charger specification but they aren't there yet.

I thought that the EU actually did something right and made that happen?

Tableview
13th Jan 2013, 09:30
I thought that the EU actually did something right and made that
happen?

Yeah, then you woke up and your coffee was cold!

We have about 10 Nokias between us, ranging from about 4 years old to a few months, and there are three different charger types. (We also have UK, continental, and South African plugs but that's our problem!)

Gertrude the Wombat
13th Jan 2013, 09:43
Is there any reason whatsoever for dropping analogue
Yes. They can make money selling off the analogue spectrum to someone else.

UniFoxOs
13th Jan 2013, 09:47
Somebody has pressurised the phone companies into producing a standard charger specification but they aren't there yet.

Don't know about that, but every new gadget I have seen in the last year or so charges via a mini-USB port (sometimes as well as a round one for its "own" charger)

Two minimal cost possibilities:
a. ream out the 2mm hole to 3mm, or
b. turn the 3mm jack down to 2mm

Sound like two ways to knacker a plug or phone. Easy solution (assuming it's same voltage), get a plug for the new unit, cut the plug off the old charger and solder the new plug onto the old charger. These plugs usually cost me 20-30 pence UK. I now have enough spare chargers on the shelf from outdated kit that I can either find one that does the job straight away, or find one with the right plug I can cut off for the new application.

UFO

OFSO
13th Jan 2013, 09:47
This sort of thing could frighten a person of nervous disposition:

My Ford lost it's Bluetooth connection to my phone today.
Instructions say tell phone to seek nearby sources.
Did it.
Instructions say tell phone to connect to "FORD AUDIO".
Did it.

Loud Spanish voice then bursts without warning from car loudspeakers scaring the sh*ts out of me, saying "type the numero secreto which has appeared on the car's computer screen into your mobile phone immediately".

Nearly dropped the phone but did it Lady then tells me I am "paired".

Hmmmm. Technology marches on.

ORAC
13th Jan 2013, 09:48
d6MyeD9yhDA

Sir George Cayley
13th Jan 2013, 13:24
And another thing. Why do supermarkets keep changing the location of the stuff I buy:ugh:

I doesn't make me browse for exciting new foods (no time for that) and elevates my blood pressure.

When you finally give and ask for help invariably the shop worker is as baff'd as me.

At least with online 'My Favourites' stays the way I like it.

Oh, and many of them have lousy signal strength meaning contacting Lady Cayley for instructions is very frustrating.

SGC

Tableview
13th Jan 2013, 13:37
Why do supermarkets keep changing the location of the stuff I buy:ugh:
I doesn't make me browse for exciting new foodsWe're not women. They go into a different mode when they go 'shopping'.

A man goes into : 'Go in, find it, pay for it, and leave as fast as possible' mode. (Average time spent in shop - 5 minutes)

Women go into : "Dress up, head for the shops, make as many stops as possible on the way, meet friends, gossip, have coffee, walk round the shops starting on one side and working methodically through each aisle without buying anything important, spend as much time as possible in the shop, block the aisles, and then start again this time buying stuff, get to cashier, pay with 4 different credit cards and various food redemption coupons and and assortment of small change" mode. (Average time spent in shop - 2 hours).

My o/h had planned planned to go shopping this morning (sales - the best time to stay away from shops in my view), early start, back for lunch......... Ended up leaving at 1230 and is still not home and hasn't even got to the place she was meant to call me from to confirm that she could get the one thing I needed.

oxenos
13th Jan 2013, 13:38
Since my phone is on the Tesco network, it would be reasonable to expect particularly good phone reception when I am in Tesco's. In practice, if I want to phone SWMBO from Tesco's, I have to stand right in the entrance to get a signal. Doesn't make sense to me.
Heading for the door with half a trolleyful of stuff that I have yet to pay for, I get very suspicious looks from the security staff.

Sallyann1234
13th Jan 2013, 14:02
Tesco don't have their own network.
They buy airtime on 02, so if you don't get good coverage you can blame them instead.

Tableview
13th Jan 2013, 14:03
Since my phone is on the Tesco network, it would be reasonable to expect particularly good phone reception when I am in Tesco's.

Non-sequitur. Your 'phone is not on the Tesco network, as they don't have one. You have a contract with Tesco and they buy time from one of the other networks, so they are known as an MVNO, Mobile Virtual Network Operator.

You are of course right, it would be reasonable to expect coverage, but that's not a reality!

Dushan
13th Jan 2013, 14:22
And – why litres per 100 Kms ? Whatever happened to miles per gallon, or as we’ve gone metric, kilometres per litre ? I can understand that easily, doing it backwards makes no sense to me. Grrrr !

Because it is measuring consumption of gasoline. Gasoline is sold in liters so it makes sense to represent it in leters per distance travelled, except it would be difficult to measur for one kilometer.

Sallyann1234
13th Jan 2013, 14:24
Surely since it is sold by the litre, it is more reasonable to specify how far that litre will take you?

probes
13th Jan 2013, 14:27
Tableview - :suspect:!
We're not women. They go into a different mode when they go 'shopping'.
Not all women are women, mind you!

Checkboard
13th Jan 2013, 14:33
And – why litres per 100 Kms ? Whatever happened to miles per gallon, or as we’ve gone metric, kilometres per litre ? I can understand that easily, doing it backwards makes no sense to me. Grrrr !

Surely since it is sold by the litre, it is more reasonable to specify how far that litre will take you?

Back when cars were newish, it was important to know how far the fuel in your tank would take you, so you knew if you could make the next (rare) fuel station.

Fuel stations are common now, so no one needs to plan their fuel stops in that manner.

It is more important to compare economy now when judging which vehicle to buy, or driving to save fuel - hence the figure is in how much fuel the car uses for a set distance. Different figures to provide information for different decisions. ;)

sisemen
13th Jan 2013, 14:34
Digital telly? Don't talk to me about digital telly!

In the old analogue days when a bit of dodgy weather interrupted the signal you got some snow on the screen (or a lot, depending on the dodgy wx severity) but at least you could still make out what was happening - more or less.

With digital tellies the slightest bit of weather seems to interrupt the signal and then you get the picture breaking up and "signal lost" appears on the screen. Then, at an indeterminate time later, the picture pops up again with a significant gap in the continuity of the programme. You have to keep an eye open for the repeats then and hope there's no dodgy weather when they're screening it.

Bleedin' things.

oxenos
13th Jan 2013, 14:37
Sallyann / table view

This IS Jetblast.

Don't take everything seriously.

hval
13th Jan 2013, 14:41
Checkboard,

Do you know that there has been a reduction in the number of petrol stations from 37,500 in 1970 to 9,000 in 2011?

Checkboard
13th Jan 2013, 14:42
Do you have trouble finding one when you want one?

hval
13th Jan 2013, 14:48
Yes, occasionally. Many rural areas have lost near by access to petrol stations. It means having to leave more fuel in the car and also knowing you need to fuel up during daylight hours.

You are correct though, that for most people fuel stations are common.

G-CPTN
13th Jan 2013, 14:57
The problem with fuel consumption (in the UK) is that it is sold in litres yet distances are measured in miles.

Figures in miles per gallon (miles per 4.55 litres) or litres per 100km (litres per 62 miles) both require mental arithmetic to become meaningfully useful.

Perhaps something like miles per ten litres?

racedo
13th Jan 2013, 14:59
Did you read the manual for the car ?

Most cars I have had that do Km/L allow it be changed to MPG.

G-CPTN
13th Jan 2013, 15:05
knowing you need to fuel up during daylight hours.
Denmark in the 1980s had automated fuel-pumps that delivered fuel in exchange for banknotes, meaning that fuel was available 24-7, even in remote areas (not that anywhere in Denmark is that remote).

Credit and debit cards weren't popular back then, but you could always exchange a cheque for cash at any retail outlet (backed up by your personbevis - ID card).

AlpineSkier
13th Jan 2013, 15:07
Did you read the manual for the car ?

Do you think I'm some kind of weirdo ?:ok:

UniFoxOs
13th Jan 2013, 15:19
Denmark in the 1980s had automated fuel-pumps that delivered fuel in exchange for banknotes, meaning that fuel was available 24-7, even in remote areas (not that anywhere in Denmark is that remote).

We had them here in UK. A mate's garage (well out in the country) was one of the first. A bit choosy about what notes it would take but a lifesaver on a number of occasions. He had to have it removed when the county council banned them due to the larger number of "ethnic" city dwellers who didn't understand that this fuel would give rather out more heat than the makers of their paraffin fires had designed them for.

UFO

Flap 5
13th Jan 2013, 15:24
Not so many years ago it was always quoted as miles per gallon. Logically if we are now using miles and litres it should now be quoted as miles per litre. Where did the number of litres per (an abitrary figure of) 100 kms come from? Doesn't make sense. :hmm:

I know how many litres my car's tank holds. Therefore I know how far I can go on a tankful, half a tank full or however much is left on the fuel gauge. Why should I need to make a further calculation after being presented with some number per 100 kms (or miles)? Daft.

Dushan
13th Jan 2013, 15:53
What is daft is the half-assed implementation of the metric system. Why liters, but keep miles? Makes no sense. And if you implement the metric system then accept its convention for fuel consumption which is measured in the quantity it is being bought/dispensed in.

Tankertrashnav
13th Jan 2013, 15:55
I really dont know why we don't just abandon our half-arsed attempts to hang on to "imperial" measure and go all out for metric. The current half world we live with a bewildering mixture of systems (4" x 2" sold by the metre, for example) is just potty.

Of course anyone nostalgic for the old system can always go and visit the States where they resolutely refuse to countenance anything metric, which is odd as they have had a decimal coinage system since the outset.

(You just beat me Dushan - your alternative spelling "half-assed" is noted!)

Sallyann1234
13th Jan 2013, 17:13
Agree totally.
Imperial should be consigned to history.
We are miles better with Metric :)

racedo
13th Jan 2013, 19:02
Do you think I'm some kind of weirdo ?http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif

Sorry mixing you up there as being a member of the fairer sex who always read the manuals....................then ask guys how to do it and we guess :)

ExSp33db1rd
13th Jan 2013, 20:12
I appear to have rattled a few cages ? :ok:

Two minimal cost possibilities:
a. ream out the 2mm hole to 3mm, or
b. turn the 3mm jack down to 2mm

Yes, I'm on to that and have done it for other gadgets but not yet attacked this one, partly because my local clone of Radio Shack can't provide the smaller plug, and partly because the Telecom giant have produced a small adapter cable - but ..... they're out of stock ! ( I wonder why ! )

What the hell is a, "volunteer Coastguard unit"? They are ALL volunteer.

Well ... no. I'm surprised that an American ( I presume, writing from the USA ) made that comment, the US Coastguard being the only one I know staffed by paid personnel - aren't they an arm of the US Navy , or maybe Marine Corps ? admit I'm not sure, but something like that. Thank you to the writer who knew about the others. NZ is totally voluntary, apart from head office staff, which are salaried,but I made the 'volunteer' statement as PPRuNe is read Worldwide.

I know I'm going to lose the Km/100 ltr or ltr / Km battle, but if the computer can work out ltrs per 100 Kms, then it can easily present the information the other way around if I choose, ( it has been pointed out that it can be changed from Ltr/Km to MPG, so it can also do what I want if allowed to be programmed that way -which it isn't and I can't change it ) if I'm using 8.3 litres per 100 km then even my simple slide rule tells me that that is 12 Km per litre ( and as I live 12 km from town my cost is a simple sum ! ) I don't even need Mr. Gates' latest gadget to do that.

Imperial should be consigned to history.
We are miles better with Metric

Shouldn't that be kilometres better off with metric ?

Here in NZ our aviation Met. uses knots for windspeed, Kms. for visibility, and feet for cloudbase. Standardisation ? don't make me laugh.

'Tis what masking tape was invented for.

As a Nav. instructor I occasionally had to block out the Doppler instruments ( remember that ? ) from the students gaze, and used two circular bits of cardboard on to which I stuck two examples of female anatomy culled from the pages of Playboy. My students appreciated that. One day I needed my flight notebook, and asked my 8 yr., old son to go upstairs and get it for me, he came back to the crowded lounge with the book in one hand, and the two instrument blocks in the other - are these what you wanted, Daddy, he said !

ORAC
13th Jan 2013, 20:18
the US Coastguard being the only one I know staffed by paid personnel - aren't they an arm of the US Navy , or maybe Marine Corps ? No, they're an armed force in their own right (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Armed_Forces)....

reynoldsno1
13th Jan 2013, 20:28
We are now slaves to technology - computer says no ....
I recently went to a professional photographer for a digital passport photo to be uploaded to the new online passport application system. The photo was rejected on the grounds that there was insufficient contrast. The photographer, who was involved in the development of the 'system', adjusted the contrast. The photo, plus tweaks, was rejected a further four times. I then had the original printed, and took the application to the passport office by hand. They said the photo was fine ... but wait, there's more
A colleague followed a similar process, but couldn't do an online application. Nevertheless, he uploaded their photograph to see if it was OK. Computer says yes .... The manual application ws made - but, yes, the photo was rejected, human says no...:*

Hydromet
13th Jan 2013, 20:37
Agree totally.
Imperial should be consigned to history.
We are miles better with Metric Quite so. Metric is a dozen times easier.

ExSp33db1rd
13th Jan 2013, 20:46
ORAC - US Coastguard, thank you for the info., wasn't sure.

ShyTorque
13th Jan 2013, 20:46
Sorry mixing you up there as being a member of the fairer sex who always read the manuals....................then ask guys how to do it and we guess

My wife never reads a manual for anything she buys. She usually throws them away with the packaging or loses them then expects me to know every last detail, unseen.

If I say I can't help without the manual she accuses me of being unhelpful and awkward because apparently I'm just supposed to know this sort of stuff.

Latest thing was a bicycle trip computer. She expected me "just to sort it out" and wanted to know all sorts of guff such as Calories burned each journey but it needs more programming than the Space Shuttle probably did. I eventually worked it out and programmed it after a fashion but I lied about her weight so she will go bl**dy hundreds of miles just to work off one Mars bar. :E

ExSp33db1rd
13th Jan 2013, 20:51
........ and of course the manuals are a language of their own, I've just bought a Portable Headlamp for my bike, a flashing LED gadget to attach to the helmet, the Manual is headed ...PROTABLE Headlight.

I don't need a Manaul to learn how to swithc it on, only how to get at the battrey when I need a new one.

ShyTorque
13th Jan 2013, 20:54
They really should come with a free dictionary, shouldn't they?

ExSp33db1rd
13th Jan 2013, 21:04
I'm sure there is a lot you have left out of your rant - it is NZ after all. The weather for one, the woeful performance of the cricket team . . .

Don't start me ... Clean (?) / Green - yes / Safe (?) New Zealand

To be fair I don't think the Clean, Safe stuff is any different to most places these days, but it is definitely OTT as a 'Come Here' slogan - and why do you think it's Green ? !!!

Adapter plugs. I used to travel around with a couple of bare wires attached to a pair of crocodile clips, and a box of matches.

The bare wires stuck in any strange plug holes that hotels might provide and for which I didn't carry an adaptor, held in place with a matchstick, and the croc. clips attached to most gadgets that I needed. Weigh the wires down somewhere along their length - a briefcase usually does the job - so that they don't wiggle around and fall out, and Bob's yer Uncle.

I never actually set any hotel on fire, but also never left them in place for any prying maid to find !

racedo
13th Jan 2013, 21:08
I eventually worked it out and programmed it after a fashion but I lied about her weight so she will go bl**dy hundreds of miles just to work off one Mars bar. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/evil.gif

So does she send postcards from whereever she is ?

ShyTorque
13th Jan 2013, 22:40
Nah, she's too knackered to write..... :)

Solar
14th Jan 2013, 00:02
Why does the bluetooth on my car occassionaly silence the radio when making the call but does not allow the in car speaker/microphone to be used leaving you having to pick up the phone as invariably the person on you are phoning has answered and is on the other end saying hello hello hello? Sort of defeats the object.

FullOppositeRudder
14th Jan 2013, 00:48
Latest thing was a bicycle trip computer.

Possibly one of the most fiendish devices to set up correctly.

I have a couple of bikes, the computers are different - although the same manufacturer and there absolutely nothing common in their programming other than an instruction sheet the size of a broadsheet with almost every language written included and presumably with the same convoluted directions.

Bah! Humbug :(

Hobo
14th Jan 2013, 07:55
Here in NZ our aviation Met. uses knots for windspeed, Kms. for visibility, and feet for cloudbase. Standardisation ? don't make me laugh.

And in my local plumber's merchants you order 3 metres of 4 inch soil pipe.

Manuals? Manuals???? For most it's: "If all else fails, read the instructions."

Ancient Mariner
14th Jan 2013, 08:18
As an ex-merchant navy engineer I prefer engine fuel consumption in g/hp/h. This tells me how efficient my engine is. Since no car manufacturer supply this vital information I will settle for liter/10 km.
I've just installed an app on my Adroid phone supplying me lots of vital information about my car's performance. Acceleration 0-60 mph, 0-100 km/h, 1/4 mile, 1/8 mile, 1 kilometer, horsepower, fuel consumption and on and on. It will also provide engine diagnostics. Haven't looked at the road since and every stretch of straight road has turned into a drag strip. One is amused.
Per

oxenos
14th Jan 2013, 08:20
At one time sisal rope was sold by the pound, but if you could find an excuse to get it from RAF stores, they issued it by the fathom.

TWT
14th Jan 2013, 08:32
The NZ Coastguard isn't tooled up like this :

_zcy5r2mrFM

ORAC
14th Jan 2013, 08:44
Here in NZ our aviation Met. uses knots for windspeed, Kms. for visibility, and feet for cloudbase. Standardisation ? don't make me laugh. Yeah, but that is the international standard....

I was an Ops Officer at RAF Leuchars in the 80s when we used to get Victor/VC-10 and Tristars attached on exercises to fuel fast jets.

The fuel came in railway tanks in gallons and was stored in the BFI in cubic metres.

The Victors and Tristars were fuelled in Lbs and the Tristars in Tons*.

The F4s took fuel in Lbs, the F3/GR1s** in Kgs and the Jags in Ltrs***.

* Lets not get into UK/US tons and tonnes

**Just to be different the F3/GR1s internal fuel was Kgs - but their underwing tanks were in Ltrs

***Lets especially not get into the different specific gravities of the different fuels....

Tankertrashnav
14th Jan 2013, 08:59
Total nightmare ORAC. I was on Victors when the Jaguars came in and the litres business was certainly a trap for the unwary.

Do the cousins still set their altimeters in inches? I remember we used to have to convert settings they gave us into millibars (although I suppose that would be hectothingies these days :()

exgroundcrew
14th Jan 2013, 09:55
I needed about 6ft of 3/4in planed wood, went to local wood merchant only to be told it's sold by the metre, so said OK give me 2 metres. Assistant then took out his calculator and started keying in lots of numbers! Whats the problem I asked, It's priced in feet was his response!http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wibble.gif

ExSp33db1rd
14th Jan 2013, 20:37
Yeah, but that is the international standard....

Yeah, I know.

We used to buy in gallons ( UK or US ) then convert to litres then apply the S.G. to get the weight in Kg ( or something like that, a long time ago now ) pre-electronic calculators the slide rule was King, but one Flt Eng. taught himself to use a Chinese Abacus ! Most impressive, but he kept us awake at night clicking all the beads.

Remember the Gimli Glider ( Air Canada B-767 running out of fuel ) that was a result of changing to a metric environment - someone 'forgot' ( or words to that effect )

The NZ Coastguard isn't tooled up like this :

I wish ( the aeroplane that is )
Unfortunately we ain't a "police" operation - I wish.

Last year I did an "exchange" to the US CAP Summer training school in Indiana, and learned that the CAP were founded just before WW.II, and sunk a sub. off the East Coast by lopping bombs out of a Piper Cub ! I asked our NZ CEO for the same privileges ! I wish.

AlpineSkier
14th Jan 2013, 20:50
And, of course, in the UK, they refer to the sawn size before planing so planed dimensions are always less than that quoted

When I go to a saw-mill in France it's the same, Basil because they are charging you for the volume of wood, so use dimensions pre-planing.

G-CPTN
14th Jan 2013, 20:59
When I go to a saw-mill in France it's the same, What? They use inch sizes? :E

Dushan
14th Jan 2013, 21:13
Manuals? Manuals???? For most it's: "If all else fails, read the instructions."

I have a rule: If it is so hard to figure out that you need a manual, it ain't worth using.

Dushan
14th Jan 2013, 21:16
We used to buy in gallons ( UK or US ) then convert to litres then apply the S.G. to get the weight in Kg ( or something like that, a long time ago now ) pre-electronic calculators the slide rule was King, but one Flt Eng. taught himself to use a Chinese Abacus ! Most impressive, but he kept us awake at night clicking all the beads.


or you could use one of these:

http://www.vcalc.net/images2/Curta-Image08b-232x415.png

Hydromet
14th Jan 2013, 21:20
Curta, the surveyor's friend. Great piece of engineering.

AlpineSkier
14th Jan 2013, 22:03
G-CPTN

What? They use inch sizes?

Not in wood BUT in some plumbing fittings and not translated to mm either. In brass/steel fittings , maybe from 1 1/2 " up, that's "un pouce et demi " etc

Halfbaked_Boy
14th Jan 2013, 22:07
Not in wood BUT in some plumbing fittings and not translated to mm either. In brass/steel fittings , maybe from 1 1/2 " up, that's "un pouce et demi " etc

BSP threaded stuff usually falls under this category, normally anywhere from 1/8" up to about 6" :)

Some people refer to the nominal bore in 'mil', where 15 mil is 1/2", 25 mil is 1", supposedly this is because it's easier to run these numbers through a computer than 25.4 mm (inch) etc etc!

M.Mouse
14th Jan 2013, 23:43
Do the cousins still set their altimeters in inches?

Yes they do but all the Boeings I have flown have the ability to display both. Clockwork dials have dual windows in the dial with millibars (or more correctly Hectopascals) on one side and inches in the other. EFIS is even better because at push of a button or switch the display can be switched between the two as also can the altimeter be switched to display metres (for China, Russia, etc) as well as feet.

Irritating as it is the fact is that before the world shrunk each society developed and used its own measures. With international travel and trade we have ended up with some extraordinary mixtures of units.

Someone asked why we in the UK don't bite the bullet and go totally metric and I tend to agree BUT as someone who grew up with imperial units I instinctively can visualise weight or measurement in imperial units but despite many years of using metric measurement and weight I still have to sit and think how long, say, 60 cm is. My girlfriend is from a metric country and when I use lbs or feet she always asks me to tell her in metric because she has the reverse problem.

We all hate change, my late mother to her dying day still used to convert decimal money into shillings and pence! As far as money is concerned I have a theory that as we grow up through our early formative years we develop and fix a sense of the value of our money then for the rest of our lives everything gets more expensive. What we also forget is that when a small house cost around £8,000 then an average salary was probably around £2000 p.a.

ExSp33db1rd
15th Jan 2013, 08:21
What we also forget is that when a small house.......................

Yes, I was earning £600 p.a. when a friend paid £4,000 for his first house - thought he was mad,must have won the football pools. ( it's probably worth £1,000,000 now ) but petrol only cost 1/9d a gallon, too. Realised that the World was doomed, doomed I say, when it went up to half-a-crown.

Tableview
15th Jan 2013, 08:30
When I bought my first car in UK, petrol was 2/10d a gallon. £0.15p a gallon, now £1.50 a litre or nearly £7/gallon if my quick calculation is correct, so about 50 times more expensive.

I remember when the price of a top quality fillet steak in CPT hit the R10 mark, that seemed a lot. Now we'd be glad to get one for R150, although that said the Rand is only worth about 15% now compared to what it was then (R1.60 to £1 compared to 14 now). I still convert prices in my head all the time between Rand, Sterling, and Euros - wish I could find a way to stop doing it.

My first flat in CPT cost me R55 a month, but then my salary was R320.

AlpineSkier
15th Jan 2013, 10:40
M Mouse


We all hate change, my late mother to her dying day still used to convert decimal money into shillings and pence

Here in France, when talking with people they know, many people talk in Francs, HOWEVER they are talking in Old Francs which were converted to New Francs at the rate of 100:1 some time in the 50's, then New Francs to Euros in 2000 at FF 6.56 = E 1. They usually refer to this old unit as "balles", so there are 656 "balles" to the Euro.

Someone in the village was telling me he had bought a second-hand car for 2,500, 000 "balles" which after a bit of brain-grinding came out as E 4,000 or so.

This guy however wasn't even born when the Old Franc existed, so I asked him why he used them " Oh, I just find it easier " :ugh:

G&T ice n slice
15th Jan 2013, 10:55
but petrol only cost 1/9d a gallon, too. Realised that the World was doomed, doomed I say, when it went up to half-a-crown.

You probably remember the hoo-haa that accompanied the duty increase that sent the price through 5/-

wings folded
15th Jan 2013, 11:09
Old Francs which were converted to New Francs at the rate of 100:1 some time in the 50's,


1st January 1960, actually.

ExSp33db1rd
16th Jan 2013, 08:54
You probably remember the hoo-haa that accompanied the duty increase that sent the price through 5/-

Yes, disgraceful Sir.

Yours truly,

Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells.