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uffington sb
8th Jan 2013, 22:03
Don't let injured people sit in your car or....

BBC News - Good Samaritan's car destroyed after pair given shelter (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-20944339)

He added no one was seriously injured in the collision.

Prazum
8th Jan 2013, 22:11
Our local police once made this mistake in a brand new high performance response car. I don't think they have ever made the same mistake...

ShyTorque
8th Jan 2013, 22:30
"We can only apologise to Mrs Dunlop for the inconvenience of that."

I can just imagine it.......

"Here ya go, luv - we've done. See ya!"

Mind you, it was a Vectra so no great harm done.

G-CPTN
8th Jan 2013, 22:39
The excised vehicle was no doubt in good condition, but was of 2000 vintage I believe and therefore 12 years old.

They might not be recompensed for the loss by their insurance company, but at least their financial loss will be limited.

UniFoxOs
9th Jan 2013, 07:59
The excised vehicle was no doubt in good condition, but was of 2000 vintage I believe and therefore 12 years old.

They might not be recompensed for the loss by their insurance company, but at least their financial loss will be limited.

They still might not be able to afford a replacement, though.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 08:07
I was caught up in this incident & I know that it was an X reg Vectra worth roughly 450-800 quid. If they can't afford a new one, then well...

parabellum
9th Jan 2013, 08:18
Well, being a Vectra, it may still be cheaper to repair it?;)

G-CPTN
9th Jan 2013, 13:26
It might prove cheaper to not claim on the insurance (a total loss) and save on future premiums.

Lonewolf_50
9th Jan 2013, 18:05
What?
They are sitting in a car and the firemen need to cut off the roof to get them out of the car?

DOORS!

What am I missing here?

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 18:13
What am I missing here? Adrenalin & shock. Friend of mine broke his back in three places & two ribs in a car crash. He got up & walked away. Ten minutes later he passed out from the pain. Paramedics know this.

Neptunus Rex
9th Jan 2013, 18:31
The original Good Samaritan was on the road to Jericho, accompanied by a psychologist. When they came across the guy who had been mugged and was near to death, the Good Samaritan tended to him, saving his life.

Meanwhile, the psychologist looked around and remarked:
"We must find the man who did this; he needs help."

mixture
9th Jan 2013, 18:37
Don't let injured people sit in your car or....

I am not medically trained, and am certainly not medically trained enough to determine whether someone involved in an RTA has serious non-visible injuries.

Hence I would not even move them. Let alone submit their bodies to the ranges of movement required to get out of their car, walk (assisted or not) and then get them to sit in my own car.

Hopefully the "good samaritan" was an off duty Doctor or something, otherwise she could have done more harm than good.

Tankertrashnav
9th Jan 2013, 21:10
Mind you it was a Vectra, so no great harm done

Bought a low mileage 02 Vectra 2.2 estate for 800 quid last year. Best buy I've made in years, fast, comfortable, quiet, reliable - had no idea anything was wrong with it till I read this thread. I'd still be really hacked off if anyone cut its roof off!

racedo
9th Jan 2013, 21:15
I am not medically trained, and am certainly not medically trained enough to determine whether someone involved in an RTA has serious non-visible injuries.

Hence I would not even move them. Let alone submit their bodies to the ranges of movement required to get out of their car, walk (assisted or not) and then get them to sit in my own car.

Hopefully the "good samaritan" was an off duty Doctor or something, otherwise she could have done more harm than good.

Patients got out and needed shelter or somewhere to feel safe......

If was in same situation I would offer the shelter, never know who or what you are helping and car can be replaced.

Got shunted a year ago when stopped to let a police car out on a busy road, me not hurt but suffered whip lash that physio sorted, other driver not hurt.

Cop stopped as was a POLACC and wrote down exactly what I said immediately I saw him.

30 minutes later he read it back to me and I said I don't remember saying it, he said they trained to take first statement as generally people in shock and don't think about lying.

Insurance company will pay up as bad PR not to.

G-CPTN
9th Jan 2013, 21:28
Most folk have an excess - which might cover the valuation of the Vectra!

(There's a difference between what you have to pay to buy a car (even privately) and what the insurance company will pay you for it - just try to sell your car back to the person that you bought it from).

gingernut
9th Jan 2013, 21:30
Whether it was a four hundred quid car or a forty grand car, it was probably valuable to her, and she acted in good faith - I hope she doesn't lose out.

Whilst I can't really knock the emergency services for performing a very difficult job, do we 'err a little on the side of caution instead of common sense ?

Mr Chips
9th Jan 2013, 22:10
I was told years ago on a first aid course to never let casulaties sit in your car - for exactly this reason!

Lonewolf_50
9th Jan 2013, 22:11
Even if it's raining?
Even if it's 20 below? :ugh:

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 22:15
In this case I was there-ish. It wasn't and it wasn't.

In fact when was it last 20 below here?

Lonewolf_50
9th Jan 2013, 22:17
As a point of clarification:

I wasn't referrring to the reported accident from the OP, I was responding to Mr Chips' use of never.
I was told years ago on a first aid course to never let casulaties sit in your car - for exactly this reason!

G-CPTN
9th Jan 2013, 22:19
Many years ago (at least 50) our family attended the funeral of a relative. My mother's aunty and uncle refused to take us in their car, as they said the back seats had never been sat in as they weren't designed for passengers, IIRC this was a pre-War Morris Minor, so it had escaped rear passengers for at least twenty years.

parabellum
10th Jan 2013, 09:34
There's a difference between what you have to pay to buy a car (even
privately) and what the insurance company will pay you for it

Not sure how it applies in UK now but down here I have an 'Agreed Value' deal with my insurer, they decide the amount and the rate it reduces, the premium is a little more than for 'Market Value' but should I have a shunt they might still agree a repair, if not my pay-out is better than market value and if my car is not a road-worthy write off but just an economical one there is a good chance of buying the salvage and having enough for a proper repair.

Sprogget
17th Jan 2013, 10:24
I wasn't referrring to the reported accident from the OP, I was responding to Mr Chips' use of never. In which case, your point was answered previously. Do keep up.

The woman whose car was destroyed has been given another foc by Vauxhall.

Good deed is repaid for kind Samaritan whose car was destroyed - News - Worthing Herald (http://www.worthingherald.co.uk/news/good-deed-is-repaid-for-kind-samaritan-whose-car-was-destroyed-1-4690863)

Lonewolf_50
17th Jan 2013, 16:46
Nice to see a happy ending. :ok: