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SpringHeeledJack
7th Jan 2013, 22:37
I was watching a TV programme earlier on one of the food channels and a question was posed by another viewer, when did such large portion sizes become normal in the USA and who started it, the working class or the affluent ? It made me wonder.....The best I could come up with was perhaps after WW2 and originating in the mid-west where both meat, dairy and wheat products were in plentiful supply. Over the years when eating in various eating establishments across the pond, even with my large appetite, I was forced to bring nearly half in a doggy bag to go so large were the portions, or leave it to be thrown away which grated on my frugal nature.

I don't recall such large normal portions in any other country to be honest, although some of the food was as heavy as hell :} So cousins what say you ?



SHJ

CityofFlight
7th Jan 2013, 23:26
IMO....this came about from marketing to compete against the next establishment, as more and more eateries became prevalent, when food prices were low. Personally speaking, some have the reputation of still over serving and they market their portions as such. The consumers are truly paying for what is taken home or thrown away. They could easily be split between 2 people.

But...Am also seeing a trend, in the non-family style restaurants, to reduce these large portions to normal ones, focusing on protein, with 1-2 small sides included. Anything else is sold ala carte, to the hungry eater. I have also noticed that many are no longer offering baskets of bread. All good choices in my opinion.

For those that want the large portions, they will pay for it with their health. Free will and survival of the fittest. :ok:

11Fan
7th Jan 2013, 23:28
And a McDonalds Large Fries will feed an Ethopian family for a week.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
7th Jan 2013, 23:32
I expect it's also a function of fixed cost increases, to which Government regulation significantly contributes (oh, the irony).
e.g. a main meal must go for at least 5.00 fixed costs. Add food costs of 3.00 for ingredients = 8.00, or for 8.25 the restaurant can fill the rest of the plate up with fries.


.

Dushan
7th Jan 2013, 23:33
I would like to turn this question around a bit.

When did the rest of the world suddenly decide that neatly arranged minuscule pieces of food, called "nouvelle cuisine" become a normal size meal for grown ups.

Dushan
7th Jan 2013, 23:35
For those that want the large portions, they will pay for it with their health. Free will and survival of the fittest. :ok:

But with "free" Obamacare all is good, no?

CityofFlight
7th Jan 2013, 23:36
And....at the risk of coming off as another well known YouTube ppruner....


Jim Gaffigan Director/Food - YouTube (http://youtu.be/kYJMloF0jR0)

Dushan
7th Jan 2013, 23:37
There are YouTube PPRuNers? Pray tell.

SASless
7th Jan 2013, 23:39
So cousins what say you ?

Eat what is put on yer plate Sonny....and if you don't....think about all those poor starving Chinese kids!

Why do folks who live outside the USA question what we do here.....is it envy or something?

I never criticized the British for putting those horrid hard nasty green peas ya'll eat over there.....I just pushed them to a corner of the plate and ate around them.

You sound like me Mum....always whining about the portion being too big....never minding she is in her 90's and has an appetite of a Sparrow.

Metro man
7th Jan 2013, 23:53
I have noticed as well that the slices of cake which are sold in coffee shops are far too large. In this case profit is the motive, the shop may sell X number of portions of cake per day, a customer would refuse to pay $6-7 dollars for a small slice and would rather do without, regarding the shop as greedy.

If however only large slices are sold for this price then they are "worth" the money and the customer pays up, even though the amount is far more than he would like. A few extra $$$ per customer mounts up. When I have coffee and cake with the wife we share a slice between us and it's more than enough.

CityofFlight
8th Jan 2013, 00:05
There are YouTube PPRuNers? Pray tell.




Dushan....Damn it!:p

500N
8th Jan 2013, 00:20
Dushan

"When did the rest of the world suddenly decide that neatly arranged minuscule pieces of food, called "nouvelle cuisine" become a normal size meal for grown ups."

+1 :ok:


Although I will say that some of the portions in the US are
so OTT it is not funny. Seems to have got better in the last
few years, at least in LV.

brickhistory
8th Jan 2013, 01:02
So cousins what say you ?


Simple.

I need to eat like this:

http://blu.stb.s-msn.com/i/51/73321943B266223DF068CDB426D42B.jpg


If I'm gonna carry this concealed:

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/174/394692139_419d5d312a_z.jpg

Dushan
8th Jan 2013, 01:14
Ahhh, that is beautiful, brick. I have one just like it, but I don't have the box. Wonder if one can buy the box separately.

That salad is a it on the skimpy side, though.


City, brain fart. Got it. Damn it.

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 01:21
For the longest while....the SW .44 Magnum always came in a wooden box until it was eclipsed by powerful hand guns. .44's are just so....well....common these days!

con-pilot
8th Jan 2013, 01:30
Uh, anybody care to post a picture of a full English Breakfast? :ooh:

Dushan
8th Jan 2013, 01:34
con, is that payback for the picture I sent you yesterday? Full English breakfast, including fried bread, is probably the most disgusting thing I ever tasted.

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 01:38
Knock a couple of these back sometime!

OH....by the way....that is a dinner plate....not a salad plate!


http://www.roadfood.com/Photos/5584.jpg


If you get to Amarillo, Texas.....this here is the Steak House to visit. If you feel up to the challenge....wolf down their 72 ounce Steak in less than 60 minutes and it is free.

Man VS food (http://www.bigtexan.com/manvsvideo.html)

tu chan go
8th Jan 2013, 01:46
Why oh why do they insist on putting that little cocktail stick through the top of the burger........then they have to colour it so the customer can see it and not ram it through the roof of their mouth and sue the restaurant??

Its not likely that the 12 inch diameter bun is going to slip sideways off the burger, is it?

:E

chevvron
8th Jan 2013, 02:13
'Embers' Restaurant, Bourbon St, New Orleans.
We both had the 'small t-bone' which was plate size; the people on the next table had 'ribsteaks'. In England, we would call these a rib joint and the size was such that it would feed a family of four, yet they had one each!!
As we left, I said to them 'you're slowing down'; he replied 'we didn't know it was gonna be so big'!

Krystal n chips
8th Jan 2013, 03:55
" Full English breakfast, including fried bread, is probably the most disgusting thing I ever tasted. "

" nouvelle cuisine"..or how to take a lot of money for minimal effort from the gullible to be more precise, I would concur with. You may wish to add delete "organic" insert "artisan" ( the term currently in vogue for the same marketing rip off ) to the sentiment.

The UK's fabled breakfast comment however, suggests a palate jaded by the waffles, syrup and "bacon", well it came from a pig let's put it that way, offered as the American equivalent. And then there's the spam fritter, a concoction that should be marketed as the perfect emetic.

I wonder how you would cope with heaven on a plate, Hollands Steak n Kidney pudding, chips, mushy peas and gravy....:p

As for the Man vs food programme, well I stick to my view that it's "obscene" in the sense that shovelling excessive portions down your gob proves what, exactly?....not forgetting the patrons of the various establishments emulating him as a matte of course.

I would be intrigued to learn the "rationale" associated with consuming food in excessive quantities other than gluttony.

visibility3miles
8th Jan 2013, 04:16
Movie theaters sell huge servings of popcorn and soda. They are priced as expensive for "small" (or reasonable) portions, a more expensive jump to "medium", and only a minor bit more for "large," which comes with free refills.

The price for "small" sends you into sticker shock. The largest size seems like a "bargain", and sells more cheap popcorn.

The food counter is a major profit center for a movie theater.

Solid Rust Twotter
8th Jan 2013, 05:42
Quite happy with a 3lb steak and a salad. You can keep the greasy potatoes.

ExSp33db1rd
8th Jan 2013, 07:48
One of my first meals with a future-to-be-Mrs.ExS ( an American by birth ) was lunch in Honolulu, at a smart restaurant downstairs in the Ala Moana shopping Mall. (no, not the Food Court, a proper eating establishment )

We came off the beach, reasonably dry and not too sandy, but still in beachwear, and she marched me into this smart restaurant - where there were table cloths and damask knapkins, and the waiters wore bow tie and monkey jackets - in America, at lunchtime !!!!

After a short perusal of the large, gilded. menu she announced to our obsequious waiter that we'd have a hamburger - and split it.

I nearly died and tried to crawl under the table, but not a single eyelid was batted, and we got two plates with a half hamburger each thereon. Enough food to see us through dinner, too.

Since then we almost always 'split' when re-visiting the US of A - and I still gain weight.

Ridiculous, I often ask for half the food for half the price, but that's rarely an option, tho' more recently "senior" portions -for which I qualify in Spades - is more than enough, it is a bit much having to eat dinner at 4.pm tho' to get the "senior" menu, still, needs must.

Sprogget
8th Jan 2013, 07:56
You sisters are so defensive it's hilarious. :}

SpringHeeledJack
8th Jan 2013, 08:13
I asked the question(s) earnestly and yet within a few posts we had political references and shortly thereafter guns and (mock?) defensiveness where no offense was intended.....:rolleyes:

Anyone want to reply without drifting like a tumbleweed ? ;)



SHJ

green granite
8th Jan 2013, 09:34
Surely the thread title should be Hysterical food portion sizes (USA) :cool:

probes
8th Jan 2013, 09:47
to match the size of the people around? :E

ok, ok, I'm not an American therefore it's none of my business - even more indecorous, not a pilot either... so I'll go to the kitchen and blush. :\

haughtney1
8th Jan 2013, 09:57
No no no, we've got this all wrong, we should be asking.."why the need for big cars?" which has led in a Darwinian sense to most Americans having a subconscious desire to fill the extra width of the seat with body mass:E Why do you think them there SUV's have such spongy suspension? Plus..don't forget extra body fat/mass is also a clever trick by the food and gun industry to cull the stoopid ones in the herd.

Dushan
8th Jan 2013, 09:57
SHJ, you posted in JB. What did you expect?

haughtney1
8th Jan 2013, 10:05
SHJ, you posted in JB. What did you expect?


I hope he didn't expect a sensible answer...you know..something like...cos they is all greedy and like cheese on their fries as well...when garlic mayonaise is sooo much better....

MagnusP
8th Jan 2013, 10:07
Well, the ingredient contant of a restaurant meal is generally a small part of the overall cost, and restaurant owners would rather scrape leftovers into the slop bucket than deal with grumbling still-hungry customers.

Biggest steak I tackled in the US was 24oz at the Bum Steer in Tucson. Biggest in Europe was a bison t-bone in Ferney-Voltaire at a place called La Truite. Both delicious. That was then. Now, the mental mog scores leftovers from a 10oz ribeye. :rolleyes:

brickhistory
8th Jan 2013, 10:30
I asked the question(s) earnestly and yet within a few posts we had political references and shortly thereafter guns and (mock?) defensiveness where no offense was intended.....:rolleyes:

My reply was intended to be tongue in cheek - highlighting a ginourmous 72 oz. steak meal along with the impracticality of trying to carry in a concealed manner a S&W .44 Magnum with and 8-inch barrel. I thought that irony thing was a specialty for y'all?

And what did you expect with a thread that singled out one nation? Should I start one asking for the name of the one good dentist in a certain green and pleasant land?

As to portion size, food is/was cheap. Gotta beat the other guy in getting customers through the door.

Obesity rates for both the U.S. and UK are astronomical. Why is that?

Octopussy2
8th Jan 2013, 10:32
Mmmm, their website looks good, Magnus, I may have to try out la Truite...

Lightning Mate
8th Jan 2013, 10:41
'nuffink wrong with this innit.

http://i636.photobucket.com/albums/uu82/Lightning_29/fullenglish_zps9acd06e3.jpg

AlpineSkier
8th Jan 2013, 10:42
And what did you expect with a thread that singled out one nation?

brick, I think a particular reason for Brit interest in the USA is that - whether by cultural leakage or corporate uniformity - what you have today, we will have in five years ( and Europe a few years after that ). In light of that, the UK has absorbed (sic ) much of the obesity problem, but it has had to be incubated at home because restaurants have not ( none I know anyway ) adopted the giant portion size.

When I saw it, I felt that the nice box would be obvious in your shoulder-holster and , particularly, hinder a fast draw. Never saw Clint use the presentation box :E:E

MagnusP
8th Jan 2013, 11:07
Octopussy, damn! I see you're just over the border, lucky you. I also used to enjoy eating at a place called (I think) Le Pirate in F-V. A few of us were taken there for a seafood tasting menu meal, and when it came to the tuna steak in mushroom sauce, no-one else liked the look of the single giant morel mushroom on top. RESULT! I got 6. :ok:

KAG
8th Jan 2013, 11:41
I know I eat a lot, but I am addicted to the gym, which is good to stay thin.

Maybe the problem is not how much we eat, but how little we move and spend calories in 2013?
I know in Europe (in US too) not so long time ago many people were paysan and had to move physically a lot just to survive...

Nowaday however... Basically no need to move.

I believe not having a daily combat sport or any other gym activity is a mistake.

Octopussy2
8th Jan 2013, 12:23
Magnus indeed I am and thanks for the recommendation! And popping just over the border to eat makes sound economic sense. If I get there, I'll let you know.

Re the huge portions in the US, I simply find it off-putting - I think I end up eating less than I would have done ordinarily, because I'm outfaced by such a massive portion of food (mind you, I seem to recall the same happening in Yorkshire... :p)

Saintsman
8th Jan 2013, 12:32
I visited Texas a number of years ago and was quite amazed at the size of portions on offer. I was told the "This is Texas, everything is big in Texas". They seemed quite proud of the fact.

I was taken to an all you can eat pizza place. The food was riduculously cheap. $1.99 (it was 20 years ago). The locals had it piled up on their plates. It was noticable that they were nearly all huge, and sadly their kids were too, but I suppose the attitude is if it looks like a bargain, make the most of it. The trouble is they would be taking advantage of those sort of offers every day. At those prices, it was cheaper to eat out than cook at home.

Ancient Observer
8th Jan 2013, 12:35
I'm still puzzled about the OP question. Why????

Lonewolf_50
8th Jan 2013, 13:19
Ancient Observer:

metro man and visibility have answered your question in their posts.

The better half and I are no longer burning fuel at the rate we used to, so our standard approach at a restaurant tends to be one appetizer, split, and one entree, split, and a glas of wine each. That still sometimes has us taking a small "to go" box home.

We also eat out less frequently.

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 13:31
KAG wrote:

Maybe the problem is not how much we eat, but how little we move and spend calories in 2013?

Good point KAG. But I'll take this a bit further. The problem is also WHEN we eat.

Most Americans eat their main meal at dinner time: anywhere from 17:00 onwards. (5pm for you non-military folks.)
Think about that. The later one eats the more likely one is to remain sedentary afterwards. And on goes the weight.

Until having lived in Germany for a number of years I was guilty of the WHEN as well. But in das Vaterland most Germans eat their main meal around noon-ish and then at night they have what is called Abendbrot (Evening bread) which is much smaller in quantity.

which is what I do. My main meal here is eaten at noon-ish, here at work, and at night I have either nothing or Abendbrot.

Of course none of the above says anything about the value of regular exercise. Extremely vital.

Oh, and water. Drinking oodles of water during the day not only keeps one hydrated but seems to keep some excess tonnage off.

SpringHeeledJack
8th Jan 2013, 14:01
The OP was watching a TV programme from the USA on a US TV station, about great local places to eat, those known only by reputation and a fellow viewer asked the question, "since when have such large portions been normal in the USA ?".....We discussed this and came to the conclusion that before WW2 portion sizes might have been more modest, in line with society, so more likely thereafter 1950's ? This wasn't a question regarding fast food practices, more the normal restaurant trade.

As has been mentioned it was perhaps a marketing gag to get the customers through the door, but was it due to the cheaper 'factory-farm' methods making food costs less ? Was it driven by the working class trade or across the food industry ?

To be honest I hadn't given a thought to the by-products such as obesity and ill health or even that it was in the good ol' USA, more about the 'how did it come about ?' etc. Even for JB the defensiveness has been a bit unnecessary. Bearing in mind that the people in the US are, primarily ex-european stock and therefore the same today as before, how do they within a short period of time have the ability to consume more calories than their fellow persons elsewhere ? I think that the economy of scale elsewhere will keep massive portion sizes a hypothetical issue due to costs, but as said body sizes are on the increase, perhaps due to additives and other stuff.



SHJ

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 14:15
SHJ wrote:

but as said body sizes are on the increase, perhaps due to additives and other stuff.

Additives and other stuff? Perhaps. Laziness and lack of regular exercise come to mind first and foremost. Couch potato-ism sitting in front of the boob tube for hours doesn't help.

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 14:20
Tis fairly simple.....as human bodies are like internal combustion engines....put more fuel into the tank than the engine burns....the tank overflows...right?

As we are freed from doing heavy manual labor these days....unlike times past....would one suspect maybe the food portions have not changed all that much but the calorie burn has decreased?

As the UK has gone to fat as well as here in the USA....what explanation do you have for that in Blighty? Did the food portions grow there?

Seems not as the crux of the discussion so far has been about the gluttony of the Yanks and not the Obesity of the Brits.

Lonewolf_50
8th Jan 2013, 14:22
Or sitting in front of a computer and typing stuff on a forum -- :eek: whoa, what have I done!

(Bridge on the River Kwai moment there. :E )

MagnusP
8th Jan 2013, 14:46
SASless, not so much increasing portion sizes as decreasing nutritional content, I suspect. Look around a supermarket in the UK and there's far too much processed food full of "empty calories". An increasing number of people living sedentary lifestyles without adjusting nutritional intake may be one reason for the UK's obesity problem. We don't feature in the "People of Walmart" website yet, but we're getting there. :(

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 14:56
MagnusP wrote:

and there's far too much processed food full of "empty calories".

These same "empty calories" are usually chocked full of insane amounts of grams of fat.

MagnusP
8th Jan 2013, 14:59
Indeed, RGB; no nutritional value (so the body demands more), but the pounds pile on.

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 15:01
Ah yes.....People of Walmart......errrr Tesco!;)

haughtney1
8th Jan 2013, 15:44
All this talk of food has inspired me to create an ice cream sundae.....
I can already feel my arteries hardening:E

And SAS..don't you mean iceland...:E

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85q4gJLyfZo

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 15:51
An ice cream sundae? Okay. Bet you don't have a Jim Dandy
by you though. Wanna talk about artery clogging and belly bulging? A Jim Dandy is also a sundae, sold here in the US by
the chain called Friendly's. This is what it looks like: (The pictures does not do this behemoth justice. It normally takes at least 4 people to eat one. However, I know of several slobs who eat it by themselves.)

http://s3.amazonaws.com/foodspotting-ec2/reviews/724302/thumb_600.jpg?1311624251

probes
8th Jan 2013, 15:59
how do they within a short period of time have the ability to consume more calories than their fellow persons elsewhere ?it's just our history as species. I saw a documentary of penguins yesterday and thought something's wrong with my vision - but they were just incredibly fat before the mating season and laying eggs. For which they have to travel and no food and it's cold, too.
For the humans no fast follows and they get fatter and fatter.

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 16:03
probes:

For humans no fast follows? Follows what, the mating season and laying eggs? :}:}:}:E:E:eek:

Ancient Mariner
8th Jan 2013, 16:16
Early 70'ies and my wife and I found ourselves, for whatever reason, in Galveston, Tx. Wifey, then a size 34/36 decided that we needed ice cream. Two Banana Splits duly ordered. When I gave up it looked like new so wifey ate mine as well. She's kept doing that in most restaurants, and there's been a qiote a lot of those through the years.
She is still a size 34/36...................I am not.:hmm:
Per

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 16:19
Ancient:

Might want to do some conversions with those sizes you mentioned. A size 34/36 here in the US would be a woolly mammoth to shame. And I'm quite certain that is not the case here.

probes
8th Jan 2013, 16:24
rgbrock, can't you think of anything else, just for a nanosecond?? http://mail.yimg.com/ok/u/assets/img/emoticons/emo28.gif No fast follows eating much (after all, our forefathers didn't catch a mammoth every day, I suppose?), and weren't one told not to hijack decent topics and digress? :8




OK, rgbrock, just send me a certificate to prove that you can, and you're forgiven, then :p.

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 16:29
probes:

Of course I can think of other things.

But it would be no fun to do so!!!!!

Ancient Mariner
8th Jan 2013, 16:35
rgbrock1, I am quite certain you are correct. She would be a US size 4/6.
Per

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 16:36
Ahhh. 4 or 6 is quite svelte. Very nice indeed.

Krystal n chips
8th Jan 2013, 16:59
" 'nuffink wrong with this innit "

Actually, there is something very wrong with that photo.....the complete lack of fried bread !...it's a core ingredient FFS ! :cool:

" As the UK has gone to fat as well as here in the USA....what explanation do you have for that in Blighty? Did the food portions grow there "

Well oddly enough, they have although not quite to the same volume as across the pond..plus, there are now so many junk / fast food outlets, the opportunities to guzzle almost at will are endless...so people do, et voila thus, in conjunction with the lack of exercise for most ( paper boy delivers next doors Sunday papers, c/o parents driving family car for example...:ugh: ) and the cycle develops nicely into a porcine shaped nation.

Ancient Mariner
8th Jan 2013, 17:03
She is indeed, pity I am not. The thing that really annoys me is the amount of chocolate, marsipan, licorice and whatnot she can ingest while I walk past the fridge and add two pounds. :*
Per

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 17:10
Ancient:

It's called metabolism. Your other half obviously has a high one.
You, on the other hand, do not.

Same here. I do not. However: a little secret. There are two ways of boosting an otherwise sluggish metabolism: exercise and Vitamin-B. The latter in abundant doses. Here in the US one can buy different brands of Vitamin B 150. One of these per day would boost the metabolism of the dead!

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 17:27
You reckon this shall become an all too often occurrence if the British cuisine continues to assimilate other kinds of food?

Mr. Creosote - YouTube

Davaar
8th Jan 2013, 17:31
How different from the British experience!

Cambridge tea room:

Customer: "Two cups of tea, please".
Tea arrives, eventually.
C: "Oh! I'm sorry. Can we have it without milk, please?"
Waitress: "Well, you didn't say that".
C: "That's true. I didn't know it would come automatically with milk"
W: "Well, you didn't say."
C: "That's true. Nevertheless, please may we have two cups of tea without milk?"
W: "Well, you'll have to pay for it"
C: "Good. That will be sixpence times two, I believe. I can carry the freight."

Edinburgh tea room after a show during the Festival:

Customer: "Two cups of tea, without milk. Oh! And some slices of toast please".
Waitress: "No. We don't serve cooked meals after ten o'clock".

Dushan
8th Jan 2013, 17:56
Davaar, that reminds me.

Couldn't get buttered toast in London. I can't stand toast that is dry, cold, and brittle. I like it buttered a soon as it comes out of the toaster so that the butter melts and soaks into it.

I asked for it, they said "no cannot be done". I asked why, they said "because the cook doesn't make special requests". I asked what would happen if I asked for a steak and wanted it rare or well done, they said "that's different".

Thank god there is MacDonald's in just about every place in the world.

rgbrock1
8th Jan 2013, 18:05
Did you get your buttered toast at MacDonald's, Dushan?

<I shudder to think how that worked out if you did>

tony draper
8th Jan 2013, 18:14
Now now! := some of us prefer toast to be buttered when it is cold so said butter does not melt into said toast,especially with soldiers soft boiled egg for the dipping of.
I believe we had a bit of a debate re this on another thread a while back,there are more of us cold toast butterers then you think.

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 18:26
Drapes.....some family secrets are best left secrets.;)

Davaar
8th Jan 2013, 18:38
<I shudder to think how that worked out if you did>

One has shared the shuddering in days gone bye. Once at breakfast in an expensive London hotel I was close to a table occupied by two rather lovely middle aged American ladies. I could just overhear their exchanges re toast. They were not happy, and planned to take it up with "management", as it were.

I felt rather as one would who sees a man struggle through a blizzard, head bowed, unable to make oneself heard over the storm, as the struggler moves ever closer to an abyss. One wanted to help, but could not.

Rather lovely middle aged American lady: "Aw! Waitah! Kehun yew pulease git mooy some toast at mowah the'un blewd-heat?"

I rather thought, after all, that she had won.

Lonewolf_50
8th Jan 2013, 18:40
When I was young, I preferred my toast buttered. In my early 30's, wife and I did about a four month Weight Watchers diet that allows some toast, but dry.

I took a fancy to it, and since then, prefer dry toast. Something to do with the crunch, I think.

One can still make soldiers for the soft boiled egg with dry toast.

Davaar:

"Aw! Waitah! Kehun yew pulease git mooy some toast at mowah the'un blewd-heat?"

Can you translate that into standard prose, please?

I got "Waiter, can you please get me some toast at more than blood heat" or "at more than blued heat."

Makes no sense either way.

BenThere
8th Jan 2013, 19:19
The portions are so over-the-top at some places that the wife and I often share an entree, which most establishments are happy to do. We also do a lot of happy hour appetizers as our main meal going out.

reynoldsno1
8th Jan 2013, 20:52
Maybe the problem is not how much we eat

I think it probably is - processing and refrigeration, plus relatively cheap prices, means most of us have an access to food that our ancestors would not have dreamed of. The tendency in the West of putting all the food on a single plate also means we feel obliged to eat it all.

The Japanese have an expression - "hara hachi bu" - which translates as stomach 80% full. This is what they deem as sufficient to eat at one sitting.
mrs r1 is SE Asian so meals are usually presented as a small portion of rice plus 2 to 3 other dishes. I eat a small portion of each dish separately - I don't pile it all on one plate. As I have aged I have made a conscious effort to eat more slowly to match my slowing metabolism.

We lived in the US for a number of years. It only took a couple of months to learn that ordering one dish and splitting it between us seemd to be perfectly acceptable. ;)

Davaar
8th Jan 2013, 21:54
Lone, your first attempt was right. I am no expert in phonetics and I was trying to capture the lady's accent. Seems I was not too far off. The "blood" as in "blood-heat" was a charming diphthong.

It only took a couple of months to learn that ordering one dish and splitting it between us seemd to be perfectly acceptable. . We are slow learners. It took us years to summon the nerve to ask for a doggy-bag. When we did crumble, the d-b in that particular restaurant was in the shape of, in fact, a doggy.

Given today's generosity, one can live for days on the one doggy-bag.

brickhistory
8th Jan 2013, 21:58
One of the best reasons for frequenting JB is to read others informed opinions, as well as the dross.

Another is that once in great while, a linguistic gem like this appears:


charming diphthong


It is indeed a wonderful language.

Milo Minderbinder
8th Jan 2013, 22:13
a former drinking friend of mine was a 22-stone gut busting foodaholic

I was with him once in a local pub when he went for the "if you can eat all of a 24oz steak meal we'll give you another free"
So he ate the steak, got a free one. And ate all that. He then demanded a second free one, and ate all that as well and demanded a third free one......at which we both got banned from the pub for being bad for profits......


I went with the same guy on a hiking trip round Ireland (more of an extended pub crawl)
One night in the Hostel in Dingle he was sleeping on the top bunk with a young 17 year old 7-stone german girl on the lower bunk (yes it was a mixed dorm). At three in the morning the bed springs gave out and Dave fell through onto the poor girl, asleep, and bloody near crushed her to death. It was only the thick foam dunlopillo mattess that saved her, otherwise I reckon every organ in her body would have ruptured.
As it was, she was too scared to say anything for days after, poor kid was probably traumatised for life.

Dushan
8th Jan 2013, 22:17
Did you get your buttered toast at MacDonald's, Dushan?

<I shudder to think how that worked out if you did>

NP. They have a buttered, lightly toasted, English:eek: muffin. Almost as good as toast, the point being that no matter where you go in the world you know you'll get a meal that has no surprises or pretentious waiters.

Carry0nLuggage
8th Jan 2013, 22:39
LM, I think I'd send that back for some proper fried eggs. You know, the ones which leak yolk when cut and you have to mop up with the bread mmmmmmmmmmmmm:ok:

Sprogget
8th Jan 2013, 22:45
the point being that no matter where you go in the world you know you'll get a meal that has no surprises or pretentious waiters. The real point being we see how American culinary hegemony spreads around the world exporting disastrous quantities of cardio vascular misery with it on the back of narrow minded hordes unwilling to place so much as even a single toe in the local culture.

Checkboard
8th Jan 2013, 22:50
... but I still like the muffins :)

con-pilot
8th Jan 2013, 22:54
The real point being we see how American culinary hegemony spreads around the world

Well that's easily fixed, just remove the armed personnel that stand out side of those horrid American food places, that forces the local people to go inside the fast food restaurants, forces them to over eat and then puts them into taxi cabs to take them home so they cannot walk some of that horrid food off.

Nothing to it.

Slasher
8th Jan 2013, 23:32
Back in the early 1990s when you left the Bush Company in ANC, turned left
and walked till you reach a T intersection, crossed the T and entered that gas
station restaurant and ordered a "Big Bugger" you'd get a burger literally the
size of a family pizza and with all the trimmings, side of fries etc, all for ten
bucks. I could never finish the bloody thing even if my drinking back at the
Bush was moderate.

I once asked the bloke what would it cost to order a "Small Bugger". He said
there's no such thing but he'd charge the same anyway.

Same with Aunt Kizzies Back Porch on Marina Del Rey...yer chicken fried steak
with spuds and black-eyed peas came either large or extra large. $10 and $12
respectively. There was also a great place in the Village in NY (name escapes
me at the mo) that served the biggest thickest steaks in the Union with all
the trimmings all for $9.50.

I never went hungry when I overnighted Stateside and one got a fair bang for
one's buck. The same portion in Europe NZ or Oz would cost at least 3 to 4
times more.

ExSp33db1rd
9th Jan 2013, 02:41
There was also a great place in the Village in NY (name escapes
me at the mo)

What was the name of that place in NYC, where the steak cost $1.99 and you cooked your own at the table in what was then a new-fangled micro-wave oven at every table ( like the juke box selector that used to be at every table in the various Diners around the USA )

Thank god there is MacDonald's in just about every place in the world.

but why do the ALWAYS ask if you want sugar, but NEVER ask if you want milk (cream ) ?? It doesn't matter how many times one says coffee black they ALWAYS give a shot of the cream dispenser as they put the cup down by the coffee caraffe. ( at least it's filter coffee, not that yuppie espresso junk )

Private jet
9th Jan 2013, 11:57
What was the name of that place in NYC, where the steak cost $1.99 and you cooked your own at the table in what was then a new-fangled micro-wave oven at every table ( like the juke box selector that used to be at every table in the various Diners around the USA )

Not sure about cooking your own steak, especially in a microwave! but there is a chain called "Tads" where they have a cafeteria system. Always crowded but in my experience not good. Tough steak, macaroni cheese like glue and limp salad. Still there was lots of it and under $20! That seemed to be all my fellow diners cared about. One to avoid!

MagnusP
9th Jan 2013, 13:17
Firmly in Mr Draper's camp when it comes to toast. Let it cool sufficiently that you can essentially put a slice of butter on it and see toothmarks when you take a bite. Yum. Unsalted butter, please (That's another argument started on this thread, I'm sure).

We get doggy bags all the time. MrsP asked for one when she couldn't finish a large steak. "Oh, goody" thought I, thinking I would benefit. Alas, no. The cat scored the several ounces of fillet steak. :{

SASless
9th Jan 2013, 13:35
Place near DFW....called "Cooks R U" or something very similar.....excellent cuts of meat, make your own salad...cook your own Steak over a roaring grill, cold Coors Beer....all at an excellent price.

Lightning Mate
9th Jan 2013, 17:47
Coors Beer

Have you spelled that correctly?

brickhistory
9th Jan 2013, 17:54
sprogget's


The real point being we see how American culinary hegemony spreads around the world exporting disastrous quantities of cardio vascular misery with it on the back of narrow minded hordes unwilling to place so much as even a single toe in the local culture.


Funny how the world seems to want that though. Almost as if the restaurants concerned set up thinking there would be local customers for the products.

Or, maybe, it's like con said, you could removed the armed guards that make those poor people eat at such places. Damn that free choice and all.

Maybe invest in overseas mushy peas shops in reply? I'm sure that'd show us...

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 19:09
The Shorebird at the Outrigger Reef in Honolulu, I think, was the best of all. You had happy hour on the bar side, then picked out a ribeye and cooked it yourself on the huge grill on the restaurant side, with Waikiki in front of you. Overhead, slow moving belt-driven fans moved the air. The ambiance was magnificent.

Alas, about 10 years ago, the grill was shut down, and the great old bar was gone, replaced by a new restaurant/bar configuration that doesn't hold a candle. I thought it must have been a liability deal, that maybe a few too many drunks planted their faces on the grill while cooking their steaks. Because the old bar and grill were excellent and couldn't be improved upon. It was a must stop for all the visitors we had when we lived there.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 19:31
Damn that free choice and all.That choice is nowhere near as free as either of you sisters imply. The freedom to choose exists in the same fashion in America & no intelligent individual would freely choose obesity and yet it is endemic.

Sooo, you can try to reduce the question to simple yes/no responses or you can acknowledge that it's far more complicated than you would like others to believe. As in so many matters, your laughable obfuscation for the purposes of political capital fails again. Nice try though, like it.

421dog
9th Jan 2013, 19:34
Yup, spelled correctly. The brewer is "Coors" of Golden, Colorado.

brickhistory
9th Jan 2013, 19:38
That choice is nowhere near as free as either of you sisters imply.


Hmmm...

1. Do I want to travel/walk/drive/bicycle, etc to McDonald's/KFC/Burger King, et al?

Yes/No

2. Do I want to order something grease-laden from the menu?

Yes/No

3. Will I go to a different establishment or choose to cook healthy in my own abode?

Yes/No


Damn, I am Machiavellian...

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 19:39
That choice is nowhere near as free as either of you sisters imply.

The choice is absolutely free. You choose what you eat. If you're going out you choose where to go, and then have a menu.

No one has to eat the wrong things, overeat them, and become obese. That's a matter of personal choice, habit, and values. Some people value the joy of a great meal, with flavors and experiences that transcend the value they place on svelte figures, model appearance, and such. Who am I to criticize?

If you ask me, the happiest people I know tend toward the rotund.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 19:51
That choice is nowhere near as free as either of you sisters imply.

There are those damn armed guards again, forcing people to eat too much food. :p

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 19:56
The gang is out tonight. Three on one!!

You ladies over value your free will. Either that or the entire multi billion dollar marketing industry is an utter waste of time & effort. Now you three heroes maybe the exception: NO ONE TELLS ME WHAT TO EAT!!! but collectively you are susceptible to those pressures whether you believe it or not.

And the chains know that and they use it ruthlessly to push the sh*t they sell. And it all comes from the USA. Stone cold facts.


I'll just leave that here & await more weary old platitudes about free will, the first amendment & how I can't possibly understand anything to do with America. Y'all wake me when you have a new angle, kay?

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 19:58
So you have a weak will, don't take it out in us.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 20:03
Classy, just about what I expect.

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 20:06
Classless. Ditto.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 20:12
Truth hurts eh fellas?

Don't take it so hard, you conquered the world after all. Just a shame you had to export a global epidemic of heart disease, cancer & foreshortened life spans to do so.

Would you like fries with that?

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 20:26
Is that pathetic or what?

First, we didn't conquer the world, and had no intention of doing so.

Second, American fast food franchises, owned by indigenous entrepreneurs, generally, put an offering out there for people to take or leave. In enormous numbers, they took, just as they did here.

If you've got a better idea, make the investment, put it in the marketplace, and we'll see who buys it.

AlpineSkier
9th Jan 2013, 20:28
Is that pathetic or what?

Really have to agree with you there: real head -up-the-arse attitude.

Worrals in the wilds
9th Jan 2013, 20:39
Would you like fries with that? Nope. Take the fries and jam them. Jam the burger too, I'll walk on by.
There, it's not so hard is it? :E Trust me, I've done it. It's called self control, which is a dirty couple of words in today's world of plenty. Many people would like to limit the power of advertising (and it is powerful) which is a legal and logistic nightmare. IME it is far easier to teach people to identify the advertising devil for what it is, recognize its superficiality and ignore it accordingly. Advertisers aren't going to go away but with practice they can be ignored.

Been there, done that. It's easy to blame the big fast food names, and yes, they're American. Then you can hoe into the meat pies, sausage rolls and pizza, chinese deep fry takeaways, fish n chips and all the other crap that's sitting there waiting to eat at 2000kcal a meal :uhoh:, safe in the knowledge that it's not really fast food. After all, it's not American so it must be okay, yeah? Chuck in a litre of Iced Chocolate, it's produced by the dairy industry and Dairy is Good. :bored:

The dreaded McDonalds have just launched a rather interesting marketing campaign in Australia. It's very Ocker, overtly Orstrayan. It co-incides with a new 'Australian' menu and some truly dreadful bush poetry underscoring some cheesy Orstrayan footage of dinky-di 'Aussies' going to 'Maccas' (the local slang name for McDonalds which they've never previously acknowledged).

Kentucky Fried Chicken (sorry KFC, can't have that pesky 'fried' word in the marketing :eek:) are running a similar campaign.

Why is this interesting :8? Because it's never happened before. As a member of the fast food generation, I've never seen an ad for these companies that distances them from their roots. They've always been proudly US of A. This year? Not the case. I wonder why...:hmm:

Maybe they're losing market share to self declared 'healthy' options like Subway (also American of course, and only healthy if you order a half sub with no meat) and several new ethnic and/or gourmet burger franchises. When you look at the calorie count there isn't a lot of difference, but the ethnic/gourmet mobs are really pushing the health thing, and I wonder if it's starting to bite (so to speak :}).

Kofte Burger or Miss India sounds a lot better for you than McDonalds or KFC and they're not nasty American fast food providers. Still laden with saturated fat and calories of course, but they're different. Just ask their PR department...

There's only one diet that works. The ELD diet. Many of us have learned this the hard way. Ignore the emotive advertising and stuff less food in your gob, then you get smaller.

ELD? Eat less, dick head.

Dushan
9th Jan 2013, 20:44
There are those damn armed guards again, forcing people to eat too much food. :p

Yes, and they are armed with Brussels Sprouts guns.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 20:46
you conquered the world after all

We did, when did that happen? I must have been asleep at the time. :p

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 20:47
Really have to agree with you there: real head -up-the-arse attitude. Oh really?

Riddle me this. Do you know what Cornflakes are?

You do? Good. Then you probably know they've been around in the market for well over 100 years. One of the oldest brands around right? Everyone knows what they are & where to buy them.


Why then are they still advertised?

Nervous SLF
9th Jan 2013, 20:49
Now I feel guilty having a Macdonalds macmuffin about once every 4 or 5 months :( I honestly can't remember the last time I ate KFC but it is at least 4 years ago when my wife was in the U.K. and I stayed at home.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 20:49
Nope. Take the fries and jam them. Jam the burger too, I'll walk on by.
There, it's not so hard is it

No, it is not that hard at all. I do it every day.

Worrals in the wilds
9th Jan 2013, 20:51
Riddle me this. Do you know what Cornflakes are?
Because they're competing with fifteen other companies producing exactly the same crap, processed product? They want you to buy their crispy fried cornmeal with sugar, not the other brand's identical product.

And even worse, they're competing with wholegrain bread manufacturers who make a product with nutrients in it. :ooh:

KFC's like tequila. Once in a while it seems like a really good idea, but you spend the next day regretting it. :(

Nervous SLF
9th Jan 2013, 20:52
Oh gawd you have done it now - mentioning Brussel Sprouts and Guns. ;):)

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 20:52
I know the menu varies from country to country. In France you can get beer and wine at McDonald's, which would never happen in the US.

McDonald's here now serves salad meals which are healthy, nutricious and low cal. As I take too many of my meals on the run through airports, I know I can count on McDonald's for a consistent, reasonably priced meal, served quickly. And if I've ever had a complaint, I got what I wanted - no questions asked. I consider such things important, and I'm a loyal customer.

I've worked world-wide, and wherever I saw McDonald's I found the same quality, reasonable cost, and consistent products. A Big Mac is the same everywhere. No surprises. It's not gourmet, but you know what you're going to get.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 20:53
So speaks the spokesman for 300 million Americans. No wait, it's anecdotal schtick being presented as fact.

I notice this tactic with the sisters. Say something, they shoot. Present a cogent & coherent argument, they shoot again, with the same bullet.

Then they muster their pals & shot again repeatedly until everyone gets bored/worn down with the nonsense then retreat into the GOP wheel where they slap one another on the back whilst claiming victory.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 20:54
I've worked world-wide, and wherever I saw McDonald's I found the same quality, reasonable cost, and consistent products. A Big Mac is the same everywhere. No surprises. It's not gourmet, but you know what you're going to get. Post #80 for you me lad.

AlpineSkier
9th Jan 2013, 20:55
Riddle me this. Do you know what Cornflakes are?

Oh dear, it's breakdown time.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 20:56
So speaks the spokesman for 300 million Americans. No wait, it's anecdotal schtick being presented as fact.

I notice this tactic with the sisters. Say something, they shoot. Present a cogent & coherent argument, they shoot again, with the same bullet.

Then they muster their pals & shot again repeatedly until everyone gets bored/worn down with the nonsense then retreat into the GOP wheel where they slap one another on the back whilst claiming victory.

So speaks the spokesman for the world's population. Who cannot debate anything without bringing politics into the discussion. :rolleyes:

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 20:58
Ah personal denigration from Alpine Skier. Any chance just one of you apparently grown up individuals can resist insulting me for the capital offence of not agreeing with you?

It's embarrassing. I'm embarrassed for you.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 20:59
Hello pot, kettle calling, hello pot, kettle calling. :p

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 21:00
So speaks the spokesman for the world's population. Who cannot debate anything without bringing politics into the discussion. :rolleyes:

I have no problem with that. Life is politics. At least it is for adults. That's twice now you've opted for a personal dig instead of actually engaging on the issue. I suspect it's because you either don't understand the matter or more likely you are actually aware of the damage the American fast food industry has set in motion around the world.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 21:05
I suspect it's because you either don't understand the matter or more likely you are actually aware of the damage the American fast food industry has set in motion around the world.

One more time, it is a matter of free will and choice. No one is forcing any one to eat American fast food.

I would wager that you do not eat American fast food, no?

Why? Because you choose not to, by your choice and free will.

Nuff said.

Dushan
9th Jan 2013, 21:06
Truth hurts eh fellas?

Don't take it so hard, you conquered the world after all. Just a shame you had to export a global epidemic of heart disease, cancer & foreshortened life spans to do so.

Would you like fries with that?

But, was it on time, or are the accusations of "late to the war" going to be cast?

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 21:09
One more time...it's a record with a scratch & you don't understand the limits of your own self determination. Sorry to break it to you old whisky chops, but you ain't a free man at all. You only think you are and that is hubris pure & simple.


I notice this tactic with the sisters. Say something, they shoot. Present a cogent & coherent argument, they shoot again, with the same bullet.

Then they muster their pals & shot again repeatedly until everyone gets bored/worn down with the nonsense then retreat into the GOP wheel where they slap one another on the back whilst claiming victory.

Edit to add, Hi Dushan, I didn't realise you'd finished playing with your crayons. Would you speak to Con Parrot? He's repeating himself again.

con-pilot
9th Jan 2013, 21:15
Edit to add, Hi Dushan, I didn't realise you'd finished playing with your crayons. Would you speak to Con Parrot? He's repeating himself again.

And you were talking about personal insults. :=

Now that's funny. :p

Typical, cannot win on the merits of your side of the argument, switch to personal insults. :hmm:

brickhistory
9th Jan 2013, 21:25
Don't take it so hard, you conquered the world after all. Just a shame you
had to export a global epidemic of heart disease, cancer & foreshortened
life spans to do so.

Would you like fries with that?


Man, it must suck for you to be a conquered individual then. I had no idea that the individual franchise owners invested their money into such a diabolical plot. Pity that you and all those that choose to overeat there couldn't see it coming.

Perhaps give it a go one day over here with asking if I want mushy peas with mine.

Shoulda tried harder in (marketing) school.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 21:28
Not an insult at all. Rather I'm expressing a conviction based on prior interactions.

You take as you find. You though, you just seize on my every move, ignore the issues & when that fails, repeat yourself. Talk about thinking in straight lines.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 21:34
Man, it must suck for you to be a conquered individual then. I had no idea that the individual franchise owners invested their money into such a diabolical plot. Pity that you and all those that choose to overeat there couldn't see it coming.

Perhaps give it a go one day over here with asking if I want mushy peas with mine.

Shoulda tried harder in (marketing) school. You are aware that sarcasm is the lowest form of wit? Irony though, not such a strong suit. It may have escaped your notice, but we also have capitalism here.

I know! us! Whoda thought it? Now that means entrepreneurs will make decisions based on profit, not morality. That does not change the moral position of marketing foods high in sugar, salt & fat to children for example by using a cartoonish clown & giving away toys with meals.

What you're trying to do is equate British morals with American. It doesn't work, I don't have to excuse my country men to disapprove of yours. It's actually another form of obfuscation Brick, something you actually doe excel at. Some of us see through you though & you're going to have to try again there son.

brickhistory
9th Jan 2013, 21:38
you're going to have to try again there son

Dad?! Is that you? If so, about that college tuition I paid...


You are bleating about how American fast food conquered the world.

Every else is saying that the individuals have the choice to partake or not.

You are arguing that clever marketing trumps free will.

I disagree.

Next.

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 21:46
Sprogget,

The sugar and salt is in there because that's what they're buying. There's no conspiracy, only a competition to deliver a taste that people want to buy.

If you can sell oatmeal and seaweed, more power to you. And you can use whatever props you wish to make it marketable.

It would probably be a better world if it came to your way of thinking about diet. I understand your chagrin, and have sincere pity for you that the American fast food franchises are the most successful world-wide today, as it seems to pain you so. Maybe that'll change one day in your favor, but I won't hold my breath.

Dushan
9th Jan 2013, 21:53
Edit to add, Hi Dushan, I didn't realise you'd finished playing with your crayons. Would you speak to Con Parrot? He's repeating himself again.

Sorry, cannot stay long. On my way to grab a quick bite (Burger King or MacDonald's?), and then off to the range for a few hundred fun-filled rounds.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 21:54
You are arguing that clever marketing trumps free will.

I disagree.

Next.
The dismissal. See my earlier post on sister strategy.

There are reams and I do mean reams of research documentation I can point you towards that blows that dismissal into next week. I think you know this, so I further think you wish to extricate yourself from this position. Madison avenue was built on the power of advertising & marketing. It works. It is known to work. People are susceptible to the messages. The process is sophisticated, refined & targeted. Corporations spend billions on it annually. Smart people run corporations.

You though, you disagree. Ok, I get it. I get the level at which you operate.

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 21:55
One of the real bargains out there is the Double Whopper with Cheese. Less than $.01 per gram of fat!

brickhistory
9th Jan 2013, 21:58
I get the level at which you operate.


Yep. Pretty black or white, right or wrong, 1 or 0.

Marketing is about trying to influence your choice.

Like the pronunciation of "aluminum," you and I put the emphasis on different parts of the word, in this case, sentence.

Lonewolf_50
9th Jan 2013, 21:58
Worrals, I like the ELD program. I may use that in the future.

As to the Sprogspew Chronicles: do you feel left out of the insultathon? :E

Dushan
9th Jan 2013, 21:59
OK, Whopper then it is, double cheese and bacon. Mmmmm, that's gonna be good. An I pass by Diary Queen on the way back. Maybe a Sunday. Mmmmm. No, banana split, with extra chocolate, no caramel.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 22:01
Yet Brick, you offer up tough guy platitudes. I would be more receptive if you came here and said I disagree because this empirical evidence compels me to do so.

Instead of that, what you actually do is disagree because on a personal level it satisfies your base needs. So, I get the level at which you operate.

I may be highly disagreeable, heck I am, I know it, but never make the mistake of thinking I didn't work you out years ago.


I did.

BenThere
9th Jan 2013, 22:07
Public service announcement

Sprog is feisty, given to insult at times, thinks there is a coordinated right wing cabal posting here, thinks morality is solely in his domain, and has resentments toward the US.

Okay, I can handle that.

I respect, though, that he sticks up for his views, asserts them boldly, and defends them. That's the essence of why I'm here over the years, arguing with the likes of Sprog, heated though it can get.

You're still wrong, Sprog, but respect the differences and argue with the honor and morality you have yourself invoked.

brickhistory
9th Jan 2013, 22:10
I did.


Congratulations! I'm betting that wasn't nearly as satisfying and probably was much darker than you imagined.


But the thread, and current tangent, is about whether marketing trumps free will.

As I have seen fast food advertising, and rarely eat at them, I postulate that free will can be effective.

You, with your "reams and reams" of evidence, and noting the Madison Avenue (actually they've moved) advertising moguls have taken control of the world, seem to think that marketing is stronger.

I believe that is the argument stated.

And to settle it, you propose...?

I saw a Burger King on my drive home today. I did not stop and have a yummy Double Whopper with cheese.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 22:12
Sarcasm & anecdote. The circle completes.

Oh & Madison Avenue is a figure of speech, in the same way that newspapers aren't actually written in Fleet Street. No charge for the help.

Sprogget
9th Jan 2013, 22:48
and has resentments toward the US.
Gotta contend that one. I dislike bad behaviour, wherever it comes from. No axe to grind against the USA, as I have said many times here.

Metro man
10th Jan 2013, 00:30
The dreaded McDonalds have just launched a rather interesting marketing campaign in Australia. It's very Ocker, overtly Orstrayan. It co-incides with a new 'Australian' menu and some truly dreadful bush poetry underscoring some cheesy Orstrayan footage of dinky-di 'Aussies' going to 'Maccas' (the local slang name for McDonalds which they've never previously acknowledged).

Does that mean they're going to start putting beetroot in the hamburgers ?;)

jcjeant
10th Jan 2013, 00:46
Hi,

Everyday .. you don't need more than:
U.S. Army Rations - K-rations (http://www.usarmymodels.com/ARTICLES/Rations/krations.html)

Breakfast Unit
Canned meat product
Biscuits
Compressed cereal bar
Powdered coffee
Fruit bar
Chewing gum
Sugar tablets
Four cigarettes
Water-purification tablets
Can opener
Wooden spoon
Dinner Unit
Canned cheese product
Biscuits
A candy bar
Chewing gum
Powdered beverage
Granulated sugar
Salt tablets
Cigarettes
Matches
Can opener
Wooden spoon
Supper Unit
Canned meat product
Biscuits
Bouillon powder
Candy
Chewing gum
Powdered coffee
Granulated sugar
Cigarettes
Can opener
Toilet paper
Wooden spoon

Suggestion:
Add some water ..

:ok:

Howard Hughes
10th Jan 2013, 01:02
As I sit here eating my tuna/salad sandwich, I am wondering where I can get some of this 'free will'? I have partaken of far too much of Mr McDonalds products, not to mention the Colonel, the King of Burgers and their friend Krispy. With my medical fast approaching, I am trying to shed at least a little of the additional 20 kilos (44 lbs) I seem to have accumulated on my 5' 6" frame these last few years.

I have a different take on the matter, I don't think it's portion size that accounts for the increasing girths around the World, moreover its caloric content of the foods. With the intense processing foods undertake, you are getting four to five times the nutrients (both good and bad) that you would have 20, or 30 years ago. In the 70's my Grandad would eat 18 roast potatoes with his Sunday roast and he was as skinny as a whippet, of course it could have been the drinking and smoking that kept him that way! ;)

gileraguy
10th Jan 2013, 03:13
Yep Maccas is putting beet root on the burger here in Oz. we're the worlds largest by capita consumer of beet root.

And of course you know the difference between an egg and a beetroot?
You CAN beat an egg...
But you can't beet a ROOT!
V Aussie joke.

And you know why they put the pickles in Maccas? It would have to be labels confectionary due to the fat and sugar content of the product otherwise.

It's not food, but you can eat it. There are plenty of processed foods being sold to the public. The Maccas model just happens to work best...

Worrals in the wilds
10th Jan 2013, 03:26
That's funny. :ok:
Yep Maccas is putting beet root on the burger here in Oz. we're the worlds largest by capita consumer of beet root.And don't forget the new pavlova sundae. I'd post a link but Sprogget would probably go into orbit. :eek::}

Canned cheese product? :yuk:
I've always said the Army don't get paid enough for the hardships they endure.
In the 70's my Grandad would eat 18 roast potatoes with his Sunday roast and he was as skinny as a whippet, of course it could have been the drinking and smoking that kept him that way! http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gifHe also probably did a lot more incidental walking than many of us manage these days. Anyway, good luck with it! Been there, done that, counted the damned calories...:sad: IME soy and chilli sauce are your new best friends.

SASless
10th Jan 2013, 12:19
jcj,

Do you know anyone that could eat an entire can of Fruit Cake that was in the Army "C" Ration? Excellent Claxton Fruit Cake....but so rich....so very rich...and chock full of sugars of all kinds.


Or...for that matter...eat a can of the Sphaghetti w/Meatballs.....cold?

The new MRE's (affectionately known as Meals, Rejected by Ethiopians).....have an entre' called Pork Chop with Jamaican Jerk Spices......that even Nigerians would refuse to eat.

rgbrock1
10th Jan 2013, 13:48
brick wrote:

As I have seen fast food advertising, and rarely eat at them, I postulate that free will can be effective.

Key words here, brick, are "can be". However, since so many statistics show that Americans are, on average, the fattest slobs on the earth (most obese too) how is that free will workin' out, eh?

Good marketing knows exactly how to influence people's behavior. And it works splendily.

So much for free will.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
10th Jan 2013, 15:10
I have seen entire Ration Pack Fruit Cakes devoured, indeed several by several individuals.
We were climbing glaciers with 100+ lb packs.
8,000 calories a day (I was the Rations Officer on the exped.) and no one was getting fat.

That's the root of the problem - lack of exercise.

Lightning Mate
10th Jan 2013, 15:21
That's the root of the problem - lack of exercise.

Nuffink rong with Egyptian PT.

brickhistory
10th Jan 2013, 15:22
Good marketing knows exactly how to influence people's behavior. And it works splendily.

Agreed. There are some mighty intelligent folks working hard to separate all of us from our money.


So much for free will.


Wow.

reynoldsno1
10th Jan 2013, 21:07
The RAF 48 hour tinned ration pack had an oatmeal bar that probably contained dark matter rendering it heavier than normal gravity would suggest. The 48 hour designator also referred to the hiatus produced in the normal human digestive process, hence the paltry number of sheets of shiny toilet paper included in the pack.:=

CATIII-NDB
10th Jan 2013, 22:02
The little stick in the middle is to keep the bun on during periodic spasms of Atmospheric activity from fellow diners - imagine a Veggie Burger of those proportions.

My experience of the US is of the Mid West and California - I never came across such Ginormous monsters of portions as shown in some posts. Is the monster portion idea limited to places like Texas or Arizona etc ?

brickhistory
10th Jan 2013, 22:16
Usually, the portions aren't has have been shown.

I posted a 72 oz. steak offered by a Texas place that they use more for marketing than a standard meal.

That said, the portions of most middle and lower scale restaurants are fairly large. Certainly larger than most of us should eat given our sedentary life-styles, but that is personal choice.

But, if one chooses to gorge, it is most definitely possible.

AlpineSkier
10th Jan 2013, 22:43
brick

Given your last post and from someone who hasn't been in the U.S. for 20 years, whaT "would be the weight of a normal steak and wuld rthe cost per oz be inproportion to any giant steaks offered... or would they be on a loss-leader basis ?

brickhistory
10th Jan 2013, 22:48
I enjoy a good steak.

Where I am, Midwest, a 12 oz. New York Strip or Ribeye (my favorite), would run $25-30 at a mid-level place. A beer, whisky, and limited wine kinda place.

If you want to go fancy, with white table linen, a good wine list, waiters in ties, etc, you can easily double that price.

Wine not included.

Your mileage will vary in other locales - NYC, LA, etc, etc.

That Texas promotion runs, I believe, on a "if you can eat it all, it's free. If not, you bought it." Don't know the price.


And I rarely can finish a steak of that size (12oz) anymore. :{

G-CPTN
10th Jan 2013, 22:53
I posted a 72 oz. steak offered by a Texas place that they use more for marketing than a standard meal.
I was unable to find a price for that 72 oz steak (which was offered 'free' if the customer finished it (and, presumably, the rest of the garbage served with it?), but the rule of thumb suggested that their other prices were about a dollar per ounce.

BenThere
10th Jan 2013, 22:59
Good question. As one who travels half the time and eats extensively in restaurants, I'll offer the following:

In a nice restaurant, the typical steak offering is a 12 oz. Ribeye, NY Strip, or an 8 oz. filet mignon. Typically, served with salad and veggies, they will run you $25-30. The restaurant will gouge you on the wine, coffee and dessert and you'll walk out of there paying $150 for two, tip included. That's at a nice place. You can do better or worse going up and down the scale.

The Big Tex steakhouse in Amarillo, famous for the 72 oz. sirloin, free if you can eat it in an hour, along with salad and potato, is a specialty. I tried to do it in the late '70s, got about halfway through and gave up. The steak was good, tender, and cooked my way, but it was just too much. People do it, though.

con-pilot
10th Jan 2013, 23:01
Besides that, I don't think one becomes over weight from just eating lean, broiled or charcoaled steaks.

It's all the crap that comes with it, baked potatoes with butter/sour cream/bacon bits, salads with high calorie dressings and not to mention the fresh bread and more butter.

One of the best and most enjoyable diets I was ever on was called the Beef and Bourbon diet, all the red meat I could eat and Scotch for me. I lost over 20 pounds and have kept it off.

Another one, diet, is to eat nothing white, don't eat any that cannot spoil and eat it before it does.