PDA

View Full Version : Help please skydiving video


glad rag
7th Jan 2013, 08:06
Folks there was a skydiving video in the thread where a pilot raced the skydivers down and had a interesting landing. I can't find it anywhere now, anyone know where it is?

Mods I'll bin this thread when I get a answer.

M.Mouse
7th Jan 2013, 08:30
You mean this idiot? (http://tinyurl.com/afdgzbx)

P6 Driver
7th Jan 2013, 09:04
This is the same approach and landing seen from the ground;

(Video link removed - see post further down!)

I'm more impressed with the capability of the Do.28 than I am with the pilot!

Flying Bull
7th Jan 2013, 09:18
Hi P6Diver,

Can you explain why you're not happy wirh the pilot?
My fixed wing times are long ago, but I remember approaches like that from my military trainers.
Nowadays with a helicopter it makes Even more fun…
Greetings Flying Bull

P6 Driver
7th Jan 2013, 13:43
1. Limited margin for error.
2. Personal opinion.

You could ask Poster #2 why he thinks the pilot is an idiot...

bluecode
7th Jan 2013, 14:11
Most skydive pilots beat some or all of the jumpers to the ground. Particularly on turbine types. Did it regularly myself in my time and that in a piston following all the rules and with the correct engine handling. That's not particularly remarkable.

A lot of people have criticised that pilot in the video. Few I suspect were experienced skydive pilots.

M.Mouse
7th Jan 2013, 19:21
I call a 90 degree banked turn at <100' and levelling the wings a few feet above the runway, unless display flying, unnecessarily reckless with virtually no margin for error.

Personal opinion (15,000 hrs experience including 1,500hrs on light singles and twins + extensive gliding experience).

Checkboard
7th Jan 2013, 19:46
No matter how hard you try, or how reckless you fly, you can only ever equal the low flying record ... :suspect:

Tourist
7th Jan 2013, 20:02
Those are not videos of the same flight.

P6 Driver
7th Jan 2013, 20:19
Tourist,

Thank you for that. On that basis, I've removed the link from my original post so as not to confuse anyone further.

Juliet Sierra Papa
7th Jan 2013, 20:24
Those are not videos of the same flight.

I agree. :(

gingernut
7th Jan 2013, 22:08
Only 190 hours in a C172, but whilst exhilarating, it doesn't seem to show much airmanship ?

Airborne Aircrew
7th Jan 2013, 22:18
It's funny how everyone is complaining about the way the pilot was reckless... Most normal people would call those he beat to earth reckless... ;)

dwshimoda
7th Jan 2013, 22:35
I think he shows superb flying skills. However... He is totally and utterly dependant on everything working out - there is not 1 degree of error available to him. A slight miscalculation of the wind, distance to go, height above threshold, many other factors, and he's toast. Let's not mention even a hiccup of an engine, let alone a total power loss. Any of these would leave a Dornier shaped smoking hole in the ground.

Very confident in his own ability, probably very skillful at flying, and certainly very stupid. I wouldn't let him near an aeroplane, nor I doubt would his aircraft's insurers if they knew.

And I do have some experience of jump operations, and yes, we do often beat the jumpers down (particularly the tandems who have to pull higher) but not flying like that.

Just my opinion.

DW.

Edited to change "piloting" to "flying"

bluecode
7th Jan 2013, 22:43
I call a 90 degree banked turn at <100' and levelling the wings a few feet above the runway, unless display flying, unnecessarily reckless with virtually no margin for error.
My italics. That's the point. He is clearly not some low time kid out of flight school. He is in fact actually a display and aerobatic pilot apart from his day job as a diver driver.

Funnily enough I didn't see many people criticising that 'reckless idiot' Ray Hanna while he was still around and what about that Bob Hoover, the maniac.

That's the trouble when you look at a video out of context.

It's seems to me that if more airline pilots had spent a season dropping skydivers before they moved onto heavy metal. There would be less need to train them in basic stick and rudder skills to stop the pulling instead of pushing all the way down from 34,000 feet.

gingernut
7th Jan 2013, 22:45
Trying to compare it to surfing, and you do (eventually) get better by getting close to the edge.

Having said all that, after having broken a few digits, lost me'two front teeth and having a tow in from The RNLI I decided to calm down:p

He looks a little to close, but can see where he's coming from.

CityofFlight
7th Jan 2013, 23:52
Have to say, I was impressed with his flying skills as well. And having sky dived a few times, I never paid attention to their maneuvers, but have been aware that they enjoy the occasional challenge of landing first.

The guy obviously knows his aircraft and VFR seemed optimal. With those kind of skills, his next career could easily be that of fire fighting pilot. :ok:

Tourist
8th Jan 2013, 08:21
dwshimoda

"A slight miscalculation of the wind, distance to go, height above threshold, many other factors, and he's toast. Let's not mention even a hiccup of an engine, let alone a total power loss"

I disagree.
Many of those things might cause him to have to abort the landing, but none will cause a crash. Only misjudgement of height will do that.
Total loss of power is actually one of the areas where this kind of an approach might be advantageous, as he requires none whatsoever till he is on the runway!

He has obviously done this many times, as evidenced by the two videos available, plus the fact that someone was waiting to film him. I expect that he has incrementally moved to this particular landing pattern over an extended period, a bit like when working up to a display. He obviously has visual markers he uses to judge the turn as evidenced by the correction on downwind on the internal video.

Very high level of skill displayed, though I would have some concerns about his ability to forsee a skydiver/other aircraft in an unexpected position. I am a qualified, though relatively inexperienced, skydiver and I can think of things that could be done which might cause problems.

Very nicely judged though.

M.Mouse

It is not a 90 degree banked turn, merely a steep one.

Checkboard

"No matter how hard you try, or how reckless you fly, you can only ever equal the low flying record ... http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gif"

Not strictly true, a FRADU hawk managed to get a bit of itself below zero at 420kts and lived to tell the tale...........

Takan Inchovit
8th Jan 2013, 08:33
Is not the one who jumped out of the aircraft, an idiot? :E

funfly
8th Jan 2013, 12:15
What happened to engine shock cooling then?
Or was that just a myth we were taught when learning:hmm:

SASless
8th Jan 2013, 12:28
Fun,

The guy was flying a Turbine powered aircraft. Think about it!

Checkboard
8th Jan 2013, 12:32
It's a turbine :)

bluecode
8th Jan 2013, 14:56
What happened to engine shock cooling then?
Or was that just a myth we were taught when learninghttp://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/yeees.gif
Actually we could get into a whole different discussion as to where and when the most damaging shock cooling occurs and it isn't neccessarily in the descent if it exists at all. Cylinder head temperature doesn't reduce drastically in a fairly fast descent.

In any case there are long established engine management techniques in piston engined skydive aircraft which minimise shock cooling or avoid it all together assuming it does actually exist. But piston engined aircraft will probably only beat the occasional tandem to the ground.

In any case the Dornier is a turbine. So it doesn't apply.

M.Mouse
8th Jan 2013, 22:11
It is not a 90 degree banked turn, merely a steep one.

You are right it was only 87.5 degrees.

People mention Ray hanna and Bob Hoover. Neither flew at such extreme attitudes and levels when it was completely unnecessary.

OK, I am convinced the young chap at the controls is the ace of the base and an absolute genius flying right on the limits when neither display flying nor having any good reason to do so,

What do I know anyway?

In any case there are long established engine management techniques in piston engined skydive aircraft which minimise shock cooling or avoid it all together assuming it does actually exist.

Try telling that to any experienced C404 pilot.

G-CPTN
8th Jan 2013, 22:52
No matter how hard you try, or how reckless you fly, you can only ever equal the low flying record ... http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gifhvDDDKnNhuE

Preston Brockhurst
9th Jan 2013, 08:43
Is not the one who jumped out of the aircraft, an idiot?

Nah, he probably knew what the approach and landing was going to be like.