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Jolly Hockeysticks
10th Apr 2002, 13:26
Questions are a mix of History and Geography or thereabouts.

In the light of experience of the first quiz, I’ve changed the points scoring.

As suggested by Checkboard I will edit this original post to add the correct answers so far.

Remaining unanswered questions in bold red


RULES
1. Questions posted on Wednesday about midday UTC. Answers posted on Sunday or whenever I feel like it.
2. 2 points for each correct answer. Multi-part questions require all parts answered correctly for the 2 points. 1 point will be awarded for answers that are significantly on the right track. The 2nd point will be awarded to the first person to “fill in the gaps”. Bonus points may be awarded additional relevant information.
3. There is no Rule 3
4. Judge's decision final.
5. Do not edit your posts. If you want to add or correct something post a new reply. The points go to the first person to get the correct answer. "First" is taken as the posting time. If you edit a post, the editing time will be used.

NOTES
Where a question asks about a “State” this means a country, nation, principality, any territory wholly independent. If the question refers to one of the United States of America, then it will say “US State”.


1. Where were the first known stone fortifications?
Jericho - Foss
2. Who stole what from Westminster Abbey in 1950?
Scottish Nationalists stole the "Stone of Destiny" or Stone of Scone - LowNSlow/Foss
3. The shortest war on record was fought between which two countries and for how long?
Britain and Zanzibar. It started at 9.02am on August 27, 1896 - and ended with Zanzibar's surrender after 38 minutes shelling. - LowNSlow/DeepC
4. Which state has a zero birth rate?
Vatican City - LowNSlow
5. What made it’s maiden voyage on 17 Jan 1955?
The Nautilus, 1st nuclear-powered submarine - DeepC
6. Which was the first country to give women the vote?
New Zealand - LowNSlow
7. Who said "Although present on that occasion, I have no clear recollection of the events leading up to it."?
Sir Winston Churchill (regarding speculation on the precise location of his birth) - DeepC
8. Which two states established full diplomatic relations on 10 January 1984 after a break of 116 years?
USA and Vatican City - DeepC
9. What was Reagan celebrating when he announced that the Americans hostages in the U.S. embassy in Tehran had been freed?
His presidential inauguration celebrations - FlyingV
10. Which country has the largest number of islands?
Finland has 179,584 islands. About 80,000 islands litter the south-western coast and about a further 100,000 islands inside the lakes. - FlyingV
11. What is comprised of approximately 37,000 dark basalt columns packed together?
Giant’s Causeway, Northern Ireland - LowNSlow
12. How many states are in the United States?
Technically, there are only 46 states in the United States. Kentucky, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia are not officially states but commonwealths - scran/FlyingV
13. Why did U-2 pilot Gary Powers encounter a hostile public on his return to the USA?
The public apparently believed he should not have allowed himself to be captured alive - DeepC
14. Which country is the world's largest producer of cork?
Portugal - LowNSlow
15. What did Rome achieve in 133 B.C., London in 1810 and New York City in 1875?
Achieved a population of 1 million people - FlyingV
16. Where is the sleeping land?
Siberia. The name comes from sibir, a Mongolian word for "sleeping land." - DeepC
17. What was the longest recorded bombing mission (i.e. from take off to landing)?
On the first day of the Gulf War, 17 January 1991, B-52G Stratofortresses from the 2nd Bomb Wing of the Eighth Air Force, Strategic Air Command, took off from Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana and flew to the combat zone in Iraq where they launched thirty-five cruise missiles. They returned to Barksdale thirty-five hours after departure. The cruise missiles, the first to be air launched from B-52Gs in combat, hit targets near Baghdad and northern Iraq - DeepC
18. In the 1930s/1940s Pan American Airways using flying boats for their route network across the Pacific Ocean. What three aircraft types were used?
Sikorsky S 42, Martin 130, Boeing 314 - LowNSlow
19. Who was greeted by English police near Dover on 25 July 1909?
Louis Bleriot - LowNSlow
20. Where will you find a mountain named after a Polish general who fought in the American Revolution?
Australia - FlyingV
Bonus points - name the Polish general
Mount Kosciusko, Australia's highest mountain is named for Thaddeus Kosciusko - scran/Checkboard

Firsts

a. Who was the first Israeli prime minister to visit the Pope?
Golda Meir - Kilted
b. Who was the first person to be killed in a crash of a powered aircraft?
Lt. Thomas E. Selfridge of the U.S. Signal Corps was killed on 17 September 1908 when Orville Wright's experimental plane lost a propeller over Virginia. Wright was seriously injured - Drop and Stop
c. When and where was the first ever German air raid against Britain?
OK. We've established it's Dover. But not 21 Dec 1914 as they only bombed the sea. When did they hit the land?
The correct date is 24 Dec 1914.
On 21 Dec a German FF29 seaplane tried to conduct the first air raid against Britain but the bombs dropped in the sea close to the Admiralty Pier at Dover. On 24 Dec 1914, a second raid on Dover by the same aircraft dropped a bomb on the grounds of a rectory in Dover. There were no casualties and little damage. A third raid by the same aircraft on the 25 Dec resulted in two bombs being dropped near Cliffe railway station, Kent.
d. What, and when, first carried a payload including live creatures around the moon and safely returned them to earth?
Zond 5. On 14 Sep 1968 (A biological payload of turtles, wine flies, meal worms, plants, seeds, bacteria, and other living matter was included in the flight) - ORAC
e. Which country first legalised abortion?
USSR in 1920 - DeepC

Lasts

f. Who was the last Miss Canada?
Nicole Dunsdon - LowNSlow
g. Who was the last Catholic pope that was married?
Adrian II (aka Hadrian II) (867-872) - ORAC
h. Who was the last Fuhrer?
Admiral Karl Donitz - LowNSlow
i. Who was the last chairman of the KGB?
Vadim Viktorovich Bakatin - Foss
j. Who was the last British monarch to lead troops on the battlefield?
George II - LowNSlow
Bonus points going here for: where and when??
At the battle of Dettingen 27 June 1743 George II commanded his troops in battle. The last occasion a British king did so - DeepC

Final Scores
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 17
FlyingV - 8
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Kilted - 3
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 2
Checkboard - 1


JH

LowNSlow
10th Apr 2002, 14:14
It's been a boring day so here goes:

2. Scottish Stone of Scone
3. England and Zanzibar - 45 minutes
4. Vatican
5. HMS Britannia
6. New Zealand
7. Oliver North
10. Phillippines
11. Giant's Causeway, N. Ireland
12. 50
13. He caused the Cuban missile crisis????
14. Portugal
15. They became the country's Capital
17. RAF Vulcan raid on Stanley, Falkland Islands
18. Boeing 314 Clipper, Martin M130, Sikorsky S-42
19. Bleriot

Firsts
b. Robert Cadman. Glider accident 2nd Feb 1739
c. Jan 1915, Gt. Yarmouth
Lasts
f. Nicole Dunsden
g. Felix V (Pope from 1439-1449)
h. Admiral Karl Doenitz
i Putin
j. George II

Jolly Hockeysticks
10th Apr 2002, 15:58
LowNSlow

2. Yes it was the Stone of Scone also known as the Stone of Destiny. 1 point. But who stole it?
3. 1 point. Right countries, wrong time.

Correct answers to 4, 6, 11, 14, 18, 19, f, h, j
Wrong answers to 5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, b, c, g, i

In b. I meant in a powered aircraft. I’ve amended the question. Have a point anyway for being technically right the way it was worded.

g. Felix V was regarded as an antipope, not being cardinally elected, so not the answer I’m looking for


Good effort there – total 21 points.

JH

DeepC
10th Apr 2002, 16:17
3. England and Zanzibar (45 Minutes)

7. Winston Churchill about his birth.

8. US and Vatican.

13. Gary Powers was criticised for not poisoning himself or destroying the plane to stop him or the plane falling into soviet hands.

17. Gulf War, January 17, 1991, B-52G Stratofortress from Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana (thirty-five hours)

FlyingV
10th Apr 2002, 16:23
10 Indonesia
15 Largest City in the world

Jolly Hockeysticks
10th Apr 2002, 16:44
Correct answers there from DeepC for 7, 8, 13, 17

Still the wrong time for 3.

Sorry FlyingV, both wrong.

I forgot to say in the rules (added now) about editing posts. Don’t. If you want to add or correct something post a new reply. The points go to the first person to get the correct answer. "First" is taken as the posting time. If you edit a post, the editing time will be used.

Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 8

DeepC
10th Apr 2002, 16:52
3. 38 Minutes (England, Zanzibar)

5. USS Nautilus (SSN 571), Nuclear Powered Sub.

Foss
10th Apr 2002, 16:54
1. Jericho 7000BC (Before Cannon)
2. Scottish Nationalists, Scottish Stone of Scone
3. Salvidor and Honduras over football, 4 days long
4. Vatican
5. dunno but Britannia was launched in ‘53 I think
6. Dunno
7. Churchill
10. Papua New Guinnea (sic)
11. Giant’s Causeway, County Antrim, Northern Ireland
12. 50
13 Suspicions of how he was ‘shot’ down, lengthening Cuban crisis
14. Portugal
15. Became countrys capitol
16 Land of Nod, guestimate
17. Bombing of runway at Port Stanley during the Falklands
18. Boeing 314 Clipper, dunno rest
19. Bleirot after landing
20 haven’t a baldy

FlyingV
10th Apr 2002, 16:54
15. Mega-cities (1 million people)

DeepC
10th Apr 2002, 16:55
16. Siberia

FlyingV
10th Apr 2002, 16:58
20. Southern Australia

Foss
10th Apr 2002, 17:00
Last
Last KGB boss Vadim Bakatim

Foss
10th Apr 2002, 17:04
first air raid

21st February 1915, Zeppelin, Colchester

FlyingV
10th Apr 2002, 17:06
12. How many states are in the United States?

I guess since it didn't say "US States" (see notes) then the answer is 1 (50 US states making up 1 state - the USA)

Surely you didn't mean that ??? :confused:

Foss
10th Apr 2002, 17:08
not quite right, but first fatal military aircrash
September 28, 1912. Lt. Lewis C. Rockwell, with Corporal Frank S. Scott in a Wright "B" Signal Corps Aeroplane No. 4.

Jolly Hockeysticks
10th Apr 2002, 17:16
OK. DeepC got the time right for the quickie war. 1 point.
Also correct from DeepC 5, 16

Foss got it right on 1, i, and got the other point in 2 for who nicked the Stone of Destiny. The rest are either wrong, or already answered.

FlyingV got 15, 20

OK, so FlyingV is a smartarse…:o . No it’s not what I meant.
For the purposes of question 12 – ignore the NOTE under the rules

Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 13
Foss - 5
FlyingV - 4

Foss
10th Apr 2002, 17:33
first country to legalise abortion
Denmark, 1939

FlyingV
10th Apr 2002, 17:34
9. his inauguration as President.

10. Finland

ORAC
10th Apr 2002, 19:57
9. He was celebrating his inauguration. The Iranians deliberately delayed the take-off till after Carter was formally out of office.

10. Finland.

12. 49 if you only want the continental states. 51 if you include Puerto Rica as part of the US commonwealth.

c. Zeppelin raid in Jan 1915.

d. Zond 5 in Sept 68 - turtles and fruit flies.

g. Hadrian II.

ORAC
10th Apr 2002, 20:00
c. Should have added Great Yarmouth and Kings Lynn.

scran
11th Apr 2002, 00:31
Damn - late again.

Jolly -

10 - Indonesia?

If that's wrong,

how about the Federated States of Micronesia?

scran
11th Apr 2002, 00:41
And can I now add:

20 - Kosiosko

Firsts - D: Apollo 8, launched 21 Dec 1968 (My birthday - I was 12) on a mission that took 6 days 3 hours

scran
11th Apr 2002, 00:45
And 12 must be a trick question.

There are 48 contigous (sp?) states, ie - 48 together

There are 49 in the north american continent - the 48 plus Alaska

There are 50 total - 48 plus Alaska plus Hawaii

Drop and Stop
11th Apr 2002, 02:33
b. Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge was the first man killed in a powered aircraft :17 Sept 1908. Aircraft piloted by one Mr. Orville Wright.

Jolly Hockeysticks
11th Apr 2002, 03:33
FlyingV has got 9 and 10 right
ORAC got d. and g.
Drop and Stop got b.

Good morning scran, you can have 1 point for the name of the mountain/surname of the Polish general. What was his first name for the other point?

Question 12 is a little tricky. The answer is not 50.

Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 13
FlyingV - 8
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 1

scran
11th Apr 2002, 03:50
Here in Australia we call him Mount:D :D :rolleyes: :p



I'll get back to you...........:p

scran
11th Apr 2002, 06:15
I don't want to give it away Jolly, but does 12 have something to do with the older "states", for example Mass - being 'Commonwealths', becuse of their original posession by England.?

Still woking on the mount thing..

Checkboard
11th Apr 2002, 06:15
In February/March 1840 Count Paul Edmund de Strzelecki, (accompanied by a local grazier, James Macarthur), approached the Main Range from the Murray side, using Hannels Spur. Strzelecki climbed "the highest peak" alone and controversy still exists today as to whether he actually climbed Mt. Townsend or Mt. Kosciuszko. He named the mountain "Kosciusko" because he thought it resembled the tomb in Krakow of the Polish patriot of the same name. The Geographical Names Board, in line with the current policy of being politically correct, changed the spelling to "Kosciuszko". It was not necessary for KAC to adopt the name change. Similarly other organisations such as the Kosciusko Huts Association have maintained the original spelling.

Born of impoverished landed gentry in the eastern Polish province of Polesie on February 4, 1746, Thaddeus Kosciuszko , a military engineer, became one of the 18th century's greatest champions of American and Polish freedom. The house at the corner of Third and Pine Streets, where Thaddeus Kosciuszko resided during the winter of 1797-1798, serves as a memorial to his life and accomplishments.

One of the first foreign volunteers to come to the aid of the American revolutionary army, Kosciuszko made many significant contributions to the American Revolution including the fortifications at Saratoga and West Point. The two worlds of Kosciuszko were in sharp contrast. The revolution he helped lead in Poland in the early 1790's was crushed; although an exile from Poland, Kosciuszko was a hero in the United States. The life and work of this Polish-born patriot are commemorated here.

scran
11th Apr 2002, 06:20
I defer to Checkerboard.........well done mate!!!:D

Checkboard
11th Apr 2002, 06:23
Gotta be quick on the cut & paste ;)

hailstone
11th Apr 2002, 10:39
12 - how about 51, including the district of columbia ?

Kilted
11th Apr 2002, 12:52
Arghhhhhh! J

ust got here, and I see most of the Q's have gone already - well done all - I'll have to make sure I get here on time next week!

Kilted
11th Apr 2002, 13:00
a: Golda Meir

c: 21 October 1914, Dover

e: 1971, India

j: Culloden, 16th April 1746

Stumped on 12, like everyone else it seems :D

Jolly Hockeysticks
11th Apr 2002, 14:30
Getting closer guys & gals

Checkboard gets the other bonus point for the Polish general/mountain. I was going to give him another bonus for all the extra info. But then he confessed about the quick cut and paste. So I won’t.

Kilted, despite late arrival, has got a. and half of c. It was Dover, but wrong date.
e. and j. wrong

Re 12. scran is on the right track – so 1 point

Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 13
FlyingV - 8
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Kilted - 3
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 2
Checkboard - 1

JH

FlyingV
11th Apr 2002, 19:39
12. Technically, there are only 46 states in the United States. The remaining 4 are not officially states but are referred to as commonwealths. These are kentucky, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. The two words actually have the same meaning. The term commonwealth was preferred and retained by these 4 when admitted to the Union. :D

pigboat
11th Apr 2002, 21:16
Pennsylvania is a State. Sez so right on the license plate, "Keystone State." Isn't Virgina a colony, and Rhode Island is officially also a Plantation - State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Is Louisiana still a territory, and isn't New Mexico a puebla? And Texas a Republic? AAAGGGGG!!!
:eek:

Checkboard
12th Apr 2002, 06:06
Who said "Honesty pays" :D

Jolly Hockeysticks
12th Apr 2002, 06:22
Not me.....:rolleyes:

Jolly Hockeysticks
12th Apr 2002, 06:29
So FlyingV has finished off 12 correctly.

What’s left?

The date in c.
e.
and a couple of bonus points for when and where in j.


Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 13
FlyingV - 9
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Kilted - 3
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 2
Checkboard - 1

DeepC
12th Apr 2002, 08:22
j. The last British king to lead his troops into battle was George II in 1743 defeating the French at the Battle of Dettingen in Germany

DeepC
12th Apr 2002, 08:25
c. first German air raid on England was on Dover on December 21, 1914

DeepC
12th Apr 2002, 08:27
e. USSR (Soviet Union) 1920.

scran
12th Apr 2002, 13:39
While I agree with Deep C re the George II question (Battle of Dettingen - Spring 1743) the answer re the air raids is incorrect I think.

Should be the raid by Naval Schutte-Lanz L 3 and L 4 flying from Hamburg and Nordholz on 19 Jan 1915, and their bombs fell in the area of Greater Yarmouth, Norfolk. A third airship turned back because of engine trouble.

Four Seven Eleven
12th Apr 2002, 17:07
c) 21 Dec 1914- A German FF29 seaplane conducts the first air raid against Britain, dropping bombs in the sea near Dover.

(Edit: Didn't see DeepC's post above)

Jolly Hockeysticks
12th Apr 2002, 17:46
OK boys and girls, DeepC gets the bonus point about Georgie2 leading the troops.

Now about c., the first air raid was on Dover. That we’ve established. But the date is still wrong. On 21 Dec 1914 a German FF29 dropped bombs in the sea near Dover, but bombing water off the coast doesn’t count. That’s easy. When did they first hit the hard stuff?

And e. is still unanswered.


Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 15
FlyingV - 8
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Kilted - 3
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 2
Checkboard - 1

JH

DeepC
12th Apr 2002, 18:48
e. USSR, 1920 as it says a few posts above.

Foss
12th Apr 2002, 20:35
...and what had the pilot had for breakfast that morning...
sheesh JH, yer certainly a stickler;)

Jolly Hockeysticks
13th Apr 2002, 06:08
OK, I’ll give in on e. and give DeepC the points for USSR 1920.
I was actually looking for Iceland 1935. There is some dispute/confusion on this one. The USSR allowed abortion in 1920 but later reversed the policy and didn’t legalise it again until 1955. However technically I suppose it counts.

So, when did the Germans bomb a solid bit of Dover?


Scores so far
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 17
FlyingV - 8
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Kilted - 3
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 2
Checkboard - 1

LowNSlow
13th Apr 2002, 06:28
Rats, pipped at the post for e.

Jolly Hockeysticks
14th Apr 2002, 07:37
OK. The missing answer for c. is 24 Dec 1914

On 21 Dec a German FF29 seaplane tried to conduct the first air raid against Britain but the bombs dropped in the sea close to the Admiralty Pier at Dover. On 24 Dec 1914, a second raid on Dover by the same aircraft dropped a bomb on the grounds of a rectory in Dover. There were no casualties and little damage. A third raid by the same aircraft on the 25 Dec resulted in two bombs being dropped near Cliffe railway station, Kent.


Final Scores
LowNSlow - 21
DeepC - 17
FlyingV - 8
Foss - 5
ORAC - 4
Kilted - 3
Drop and Stop - 2
Scran - 2
Checkboard - 1


JH

Checkboard
14th Apr 2002, 16:38
STILL NO EXTRA POINT! - I'll wait for the next one like a shark in the JetBlast water!