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TWT
4th Jun 2012, 02:53
Very handy in this case:

Saudi princess runs up 15 million shopping bill - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/5514600/Saudi-princess-runs-up-15-million-shopping-bill.html)

Saudi Royal Princess Maha Al-Sudairi 'does a 5m runner from Paris hotel' | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2154152/Saudi-Royal-Princess-Maha-Al-Sudairi-does-5m-runner-Paris-hotel.html?ito=feeds-newsxml)

Loose rivets
4th Jun 2012, 05:12
Naughty Auntie!!!!!!!!!!


Her weekly dry cleaning bill alone was said to be 30,000.

That sounds reasonable. Mine's nearly that, and I only send in me underpants.:}

. . . a representative would offer staff an embossed document stating "Payment to Follow".


An embossed document? I hadn't thought of that. It'll make all the difference.

Come on shop owners. The woman has been shortchanged, and clearly needs to cover herself. Mind you, a Burka with no eye slot would improve her looks.

Lon More
4th Jun 2012, 08:36
If she's not paying her cleaning bills her creditors could start selling her kacked kecks on E-Bay.

ArthurR
4th Jun 2012, 11:06
Loose rivets:
Her weekly dry cleaning bill alone was said to be 30,000.

That sounds reasonable. Mine's nearly that, and I only send in me underpants.http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/badteeth.gif


sounds like its not only your rivets that are loose:E

Sallyann1234
4th Jun 2012, 11:20
What a crazy country. They'll let her run up debts for millions, but won't let her drive!

beaufort1
4th Jun 2012, 12:32
Well that might be a blessing, think how many parking tickets she would have run up. :}

ExXB
4th Jun 2012, 13:46
I'm fairly certain that she does not qualify for 'diplomatic immunity'. While she may be a member of a royal family she doesn't appear to carry any diplomatic status.

Methinks that retailers of expensive undergarments should be more careful extending credit.

In any case DI would not extend to dealings of this nature. Parking tickets, speeding fines, murder yes, but running up bills, no.

Checkboard
4th Jun 2012, 14:04
Sorry, ExxB:

Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_Convention_on_Diplomatic_Relations#Summary_of_provisi ons)

Under Article 37, the family members of a diplomat that are living in the host country enjoy most of the same protections as the diplomats themselves.

and,

Under Article 29, diplomats must not be liable to any form of arrest or detention. They are immune from civil or criminal prosecution, ...

The only thing the French government may do is expel her.

tony draper
4th Jun 2012, 14:20
I though Diplomatic Immunity didn't protect if a actual crime was commited?,wasn't some Saudi Prince nabbed put on trial and sentenced for bumping off his boyfriend a while back?
:uhoh:

flyingwerks
4th Jun 2012, 14:24
Ask the nephew to pay he owns the George. v

airship
4th Jun 2012, 15:13
TWT's first link apparently dates back to 2009...By Peter Allen in Paris 12:52PM BST 12 Jun 2009, the second is a bit more upto date...

In my own experience, the Saudis have always (eventually) settled all outstanding debts remaining from expenditures by 100% or all of their (2,000 plus + counting) Princes and Princesses etc. during their unofficial "foreign visits" abroad.

Thank goodness none of our own Royal Family (the UK of GB and Northern Ireland) behave similarly, or are as numerous...?! :ok:

Checkboard
4th Jun 2012, 15:34
I though Diplomatic Immunity didn't protect if a actual crime was commited?,wasn't some Saudi Prince nabbed put on trial and sentenced for bumping off his boyfriend a while back?
Sorry, Mr D - but it's immunity from arrest or prosecution for ANY crime, up to and including murder. One bloke shot his wife and burned her body in his back yard in front of a bunch of witnesses, and the police could do nothing about it.
Diplomatic immunity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplomatic_immunity#Diplomatic_incidents)

Having said that, the police can ask the country of the diplomat to withdraw immunity, in which case arrest and prosecution can go ahead (good luck with that for the Saudis :rolleyes:). The diplomat's country may also launch their own prosecution for the crime, at home under their own laws - so the diplomat may not get off scot-free even if they can escape arrest and prosecution in their host country.

With the Saudi Prince thing - it isn't enough to just be a Prince. You have to be nominated as a diplomat by your government - that is, assigned to a diplomatic mission, and given a diplomatic passport designating you as such.

ExXB
4th Jun 2012, 15:55
Sorry, ExxB:

Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_Convention_on_Diplomatic_Relations#Summary_of_provisi ons)

Under Article 37, the family members of a diplomat that are living in the host country enjoy most of the same protections as the diplomats themselves.

and,

Under Article 29, diplomats must not be liable to any form of arrest or detention. They are immune from civil or criminal prosecution, ...

The only thing the French government may do is expel her.

Don't disagree but I don't see where this 'lady' is a family member of a diplomat living in France. She, nor her husband, are diplomats accredited by France. She is the spoiled child of a prince, or whatnot.