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OFSO
28th May 2012, 19:41
Mrs OFSO's cousin has a large elderly black dog (indiscriminate breed) called Poppy, which was dumped on her years ago, and she's cared for Poppy ever since. Poppy has a sweet gentle nature.

Last year Poppy was diagnosed with cancer and the cousin has spent a lot of cash keeping her alive. The weekend before last Poppy was very ill and falling over, losing control of her bladder, wouldn't eat anything such as steak or chicken that cousin cooked especially for her. The vet said "don't expect Poppy to last the weekend".

The whole family went out to the favourite Turkish restaurant in Upper Street on the Friday night two weeks ago and as usual they couldn't finish up the mountains of excellent food. Accordingly the lamb chops, steaks etc were made up into a doggy bag and brought home for Poppy.

Late Friday night Poppy sniffed the lamb chops and thought she might try one. After that she thought she might try another, too. And a third, kind of forcing it down. Would you believe it, by Saturday midmorning her health was back to normal, on the Tuesday when I arrived she came out to greet me and show me her new toy - walking slowly but OK - and is doing fine today, a week later. The vet has taken her off the "last resort" medication today and said Poppy no longer needs it.

We told the owners of the restaurant last Friday - Turkish food is pretty good for us humans, but you wouldn't believe what it does for a dying dog !

G-CPTN
28th May 2012, 20:17
Excellent!

Loose rivets
28th May 2012, 20:42
I keep an open mind about these things since I posted on the medical forum about Curcumin and my pal with Parkinsons. Totally amazing, and he's still pottering on in his workshop and driving around his Texas-sized garden in a fourwheeler buggy.

G-CPTN
28th May 2012, 21:02
If nothing else, Poppy had a feast to remember . . .

Solid Rust Twotter
28th May 2012, 21:04
Good on that girl.:ok:

Rather be Gardening
28th May 2012, 21:36
OFSO, a lovely story to give hope to all us owners of ancient wuffers!:ok:

DX Wombat
28th May 2012, 22:14
Agreed RBG - how is your doggy doing?

gingernut
28th May 2012, 22:19
(Turkish) Delightful.

racedo
28th May 2012, 23:38
Loose Rivets

Do tell on this....

sitigeltfel
29th May 2012, 06:11
Just reminded me of an old tape buried away somewhere.....

05AFHeSk5N0

probes
29th May 2012, 06:21
Miracles happen :ok:.
Our dachs (kinda-elderly, too) had a very serious kidney condition 2 autumns ago, we had almost decided it won't do to let her suffer (wasn't able to move much any more), and then the doctor decided to wait for just one more round of blood-tests... which showed a little hope! Then we were told not to hope for more than half a year, and here she is now, as bossy as ever. Didn't get any Turkish, though, just the 'heart and kidney support' food something.

Loose rivets
29th May 2012, 06:45
racedo, this is the thread. I witnessed an improvement, but waited months to start this thread.


http://www.pprune.org/medical-health/229577-parkinsons-altzheimers-miracle.html#post2640612

racedo
29th May 2012, 19:17
Loose

Current situation given its 6 years since post.

chiglet
29th May 2012, 22:33
Our doggie [Cocker Spaniel] is a rescue dog. She is about 15yo. Three years ago she had a minor stroke, but pulled through. She has Reiki most days, and still wakks over 1km per day. She has artritis. can't see much, has "selective" deafness, but a great quality of life....oh yes, she thinks that she is a cat. She doesn't have owners...she has servants.
Long may it continue

Rather be Gardening
29th May 2012, 23:22
DX, he's a lot better, thanks. More lumps than dog these days, but every day's a delight with him:ok:

airship
31st May 2012, 18:04
Just wanted to echo G-CPTN's Excellent!.

Also to say that whilst I had 'many dogs as a child', I never accompanied any into their old age or last moments. As an adult, I've never quite been able to accept the increased responsibilities of having a dog, over cats. But I've accompanied all of my own cats during their illnesses, old age and last moments.

Unfortunetly, I've never had the support from my own vet that I might have expected (or others here have received from their own vets perhaps). My last vet (whom I used for almost 10 years - I have had no current vet for the past 2-3 years) was more keen on (spending my cash as vulnerable as I and many others are in these situations) conducting multiple and various tests using sophisticated equipment, often with poor prognosis, which invariably amounted to costing much more than the inevitable costs of actually 'opening up' and/or operating on the poor cat to 'really see' what the problem was in the 1st place...? For example, one of my ageing cats, diagnosed and treated for diabetes, whom I injected with insulin on a daily-basis over 8 months, with monthly visits to the vet to control the amount of insulin, basically suffered a horrible death in the very early hours one morning due to an overdose (the usual dosage prescribed, the vet closed and unobtainable - the emrgency number being a vet a 1/2 hour's drive away). I'll never know for sure, perhaps the cat (her name was Pudi), experienced a sudden reversal 'for the better' and didn't need the prescribed dosage anymore, or a lesser one would have been better. But as I knew later, there are methods and products available and which you should have at hand, such as having a bottle of maple syrup or sugar-rich equivalent, to administer to the cat's mouth during such a crisis. My vet never ever discussed this with me. I learned about it all (too late for Pudi) though.

But now I know. That vets are probably as trust-worthy as bankers (if you know what I mean).

PS. sitigeltfel, nice link to cats and dogs interacting...?!
PPS. Don't deny your cats / dogs their favourite tidbits and/or snacks, especially when they get older. These could make all the difference in their (wanting to make a) recovery. Just a thought.

ColliedogWizard
31st May 2012, 22:43
I used to love this band- Seventh Wave - as a lad. Remember listening to that song with my old mongrel in the 70's. Was lovely to hear it again, this time with the ageing collie - 11 1/2 & still going strong. Long may he do so.

Great post sitigeltfel.

Thanks:D

DX Wombat
1st Jun 2012, 00:15
Please be very careful and consult a vet before giving ANY unprescribed alleged remedy to your dog or cat as even the most innocuous substance may prove lethal - cats, for example can be killed by being given Paracetamol or Morphine, both safely prescribable for human beings. Just because it is safe for people does NOT mean it will be safe or effective for your animal.

Loose rivets
1st Jun 2012, 05:38
racedo. Current situation given its 6 years since post.

6 years!!?? Tis but the blink of an eye to me now.

He's much as described in post 3. My visit this spring found him pottering and managing his 180 acre garden, huge sheds of technical gizmos and vast ex-military toys of earth-moving persuasion. He describes technical things with a syllable-count that exceeds my twenty limit and has little tremor, however, tis an experiment with no real 'controls', but he really is beating the odds at the moment.

Loose rivets
1st Jun 2012, 05:45
DX. I was very surprised to be advised about the differences with animal's reaction to certain drugs. I had hoped to lull a much loved animal to sleep while on his favorite chair but almost every drug I could lay hands on was not suitable for animals. The benzodiazepine group for instance 'sends them crazy.' Didn't dare put it to the test, though what happened later couldn't have been much worse.

I paid quite a lot for a 15 year old cat to have two-stage euthanasia. The first jab seemed to cause chaos and was very upsetting. Shan't do that again.

airship
1st Jun 2012, 17:17
Loose rivets wrote: I paid quite a lot for a 15 year old cat to have two-stage euthanasia. The first jab seemed to cause chaos and was very upsetting. Shan't do that again.

Similar situation perhaps, to when I 'put down' my Grey cat back in 2007.

My vet administers the injection, leaves me alone with him. Comes back after several minutes, I say "he's still breathing...?!". The vet administers a 2nd injection, leaves me alone with him, comes back after another few minutes. I say "he's still breathing, WTF...?!". The vet administers a 3rd injection, whilst explaining that sometimes the drugs don't work as required or may be defective...?! This time, the vet stays with me, as I hold Grey. When I next put my ear down to his chest and no longer hear anything. No breathing, no heart-beat. Finally.

But I'll always continue to wonder whether or not his so-called "fatal prognosis" (cancer of the lower intestinal wall) could not have been perhaps resolved more readily by simply operating and cutting-out the bad part...? I often wonder whether Grey's "reteicence to die" during those events of 2007 and related above, reflected his wish to continue living, somehow trying to say, don't do it...?! :sad:

His death, perhaps more than the loss of my own father within a period of a few weeks at the time, probably contributed to my general anti-social behaviour, alcoholism and what not (but I'm getting to grips with all that, slowly).

"Good vets" are probably worth more than they weigh in gold. All the other vets are probably in fact dangerous to your pets' well-being...?!

racedo
1st Jun 2012, 20:30
6 years!!?? Tis but the blink of an eye to me now.

He's much as described in post 3. My visit this spring found him pottering and managing his 180 acre garden, huge sheds of technical gizmos and vast ex-military toys of earth-moving persuasion. He describes technical things with a syllable-count that exceeds my twenty limit and has little tremor, however, tis an experiment with no real 'controls', but he really is beating the odds at the moment.

You don't prove it works but then again you didn't set out to tell me that.

You proved it worked for 1 person which is a damm sight more than the $50 million the drug companies will spend on testing for something which may have disastrous side effects.

Worth a look further and if know of anybody with Parkinsons well its worth a shot, better than pumping them full of crap...............THANK YOU.