PDA

View Full Version : Breeding Habits of Woodworm?


BabyBear
21st May 2012, 18:37
Having a log burning stove I annually buy 2.5m logs (known locally as sticks) from the Forestry Commission and use the chopping of them as a second source of personal heating. Having just started to chop them this year I notice they are riddled with woodworm holes. My understanding is that the holes are made when the adults leave?

Question is; is there a risk of introducing said beasties to the house if I bring the logs in for burning during the coming winter?

BB

G-CPTN
21st May 2012, 18:43
First identify your specie of woodworm (beetle):-
Woodworm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodworm)

Common furniture beetle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_furniture_beetle#Life_cycle)

OFSO
21st May 2012, 19:19
Yes BabyBear there certainly is ! I never bring logs into the house until just before I'm going to burn them, and I suggest you do the same. Incidently if you have processional caterpillars in your area and pine trees, wear gloves when handling firewood as the wee hairy beasties leave a trail when climbing over logs. I talk from (itchy) experience !

BabyBear
21st May 2012, 19:43
Thanks G-CPTN, checked thos eout previously and found they didn't help.

OFSO, if you bring them on before burning and burn every day then presumably there are always logs in the house (during the winter)? I don't keep them in the house during the summer months. What I want to know is whether the woodworm will have left my sticks and gone elsewhere, or are likely to still be in the trunks?

Who was asking about log burners last year?:= Now what's the coalman's number?

BB

anotherthing
21st May 2012, 22:35
The male worm needs to get wood before he can breed

Airborne Aircrew
21st May 2012, 23:02
The male worm needs to get wood before he can breed

That's true of most mammals too.. :}

osmosis
22nd May 2012, 02:53
What I want to know is whether the woodworm will have left my sticks and gone elsewhere, or are likely to still be in the trunks?

From our experience in Oz... still in the trunks. Be warned.

OFSO
22nd May 2012, 03:25
presumably there are always logs in the house (during the winter)?

No, they remain in a stack out the front or in the trailer and I go and get them as necessary. This also keeps me awake, going out to get 'em. Only exception to this is when it's snowed hard, then they go outside on the rear terrace.

david1300
22nd May 2012, 04:13
@anotherthing - would have made me spit coffee on my keyboard if I was drinking some at the time :ok::ok:

Milo Minderbinder
22nd May 2012, 08:34
the wrong question is being asked, as woodworm beetles are going to get into the house if the logs are stored anywhere local.

The correct question should be:
is the wood and timber in the house treated with pesticide?

In the UK all such building materials are treated, to prevent such infestations. Is that the case in your part of the world?
Of course, most furniture isn't treated - but most of that nowadays is MDF anyway

BabyBear
22nd May 2012, 09:02
Milo, that is a question I considered, yep in the, presently sunny UK, and contemplating getting out to chop more logs. It was more the structure of the house I was concerned about, hadn't really considered being sat on the chair and ending up on the floor as it collapsed around me.:eek:

It seems it is not worth taking the chance for the sake of a 100, or so. Anyone want 3 or 4 tonnes of logs?

BB

AlpineSkier
22nd May 2012, 10:02
Woodworm can't survive if it is warm and dry, so if present would presumably retreat further into wood when wood is brought into (warm ? ) house and then be consumed by flames.

Milo Minderbinder
22nd May 2012, 11:39
BabyBear

How old is the house? Or if its old, how long since it was renovated
I'd be very surprised if the timbers are untreated

MagnusP
22nd May 2012, 12:22
We bought an antique mahogany chest of drawers which had old signs of woodworm, and a faint smell of paraffin which apparently can be used to treat woodworm. The logs would burn better, too!

gingernut
22nd May 2012, 22:46
One has to be select when stealing firewood.

Ignore anyone who says, "I've got a few old logs," they'll be likely powdery and full of fungus. Either burn, hot compost or leave.

Chop up said wood...


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0021.jpg


then sort out the wheat from the chaff, all the sh*tty bits, put near shed for burning in chiminea when out in the cold...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0022-3.jpg

Stock up pile in log shed and use to grow runner beans around....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0016-2.jpg

Build up pile......

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0007-1.jpg

And keep building.....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0006-2.jpg


Build up "PUP" (P*ssed up pile-easy to access on a Tuesday night.)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0026.jpg


Worry about woodworm then burn house down....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0017-1.jpg

BabyBear
22nd May 2012, 23:30
Build up "PUP" (P*ssed up pile-easy to access on a Tuesday night.)

If you require to find logs this P*ssed up Tuesday I suggest your internal body thermostat requires seeing to.:p It must be the hottest evening of 2012!

BB

gingernut
22nd May 2012, 23:44
Not this Tuesday BB, but Tuesday's in general. :p