PDA

View Full Version : Video of F-35B suitability trials


Just a spotter
18th May 2012, 23:03
F-35B Ship Suitability Testing - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=Ki86x1WKPmE&feature=colike)

Watch the elevators as the aircraft leave the deck.

JAS

bnt
18th May 2012, 23:25
I hope they have some Teflon coating on the edges of those elevators - they're nearly scraping on the deck. At such a low takeoff speed with the vertical fan doing half the work, they aren't doing all that much, so I wonder whether they need to be vectored so dramatically ... :8

G-CPTN
18th May 2012, 23:37
If the take-off performance is as marginal as appears to be the case, one can expect a high percentage of failures to attain flight . . .

. . . with a subsequent ditching . . .

gingernut
19th May 2012, 07:23
some good advice written on the wall at 1:26

G&T ice n slice
19th May 2012, 08:14
Is it just me, or does the whole thing seem just waaaay to complicated for its own good?

not to mention costing $150 millions each.

Flap 5
19th May 2012, 08:15
The Harrier benefited greatly from the ski jump added to the flight deck. The F-35B should also benefit from a ski jump as well but with that amount of elevator deflection at take off there could be a problem ...

green granite
19th May 2012, 09:17
I wonder what the limiting speed is when that huge 'air brake' type air intake is open.

Milo Minderbinder
19th May 2012, 09:25
you mean the seagull scoop?

hval
19th May 2012, 09:28
Milo,

That's not a seagull scoop, it's a leaf blower.

On second thoughts carriers don't have leaves, so maybe it is a seagull scoop whilst on board a carrier.

Lon More
19th May 2012, 09:35
The F-35B should also benefit from a ski jump as well
NIHs at work?

It might take-off better without the airbrake

Avionker
19th May 2012, 09:53
I hope they have some Teflon coating on the edges of those elevators - they're nearly scraping on the deck. At such a low takeoff speed with the vertical fan doing half the work, they aren't doing all that much, so I wonder whether they need to be vectored so dramatically ...

I would say that the low speed is precisely the reason for such a large deflection. The elevators will be less effective with less airflow over them, so the deflection required for a given pitch down movement will be proportionally larger. At a guess the elevator input is required to counteract the pitch up that the ruddy great intake door is generating.

Noah Zark.
19th May 2012, 10:55
At a guess the elevator input is required to counteract the pitch up that the ruddy great intake door is generating.
Don't know about that, the elevators are moving in tandem with the jet exhaust nozzle. Just how much pitch up can the wheelie bin lid create?

Avionker
19th May 2012, 11:22
Now that you mention it, there also appears to be a significant amount of elevator deflection when landing from the hover. Any chance that it could be an effort to generate lift from the elevators at low airspeed?

Takan Inchovit
19th May 2012, 11:38
Wouldnt like to see the exhaust nozzle blow off, it must have huge loadings at that deflection angle.

Dan Gerous
19th May 2012, 14:51
I know very little about aerodyanamics, but could the elevators be being used as an "air dam", by keeping the column of downward thrust underneath the airframe and offering some support, rather than it escaping around the airframe?

URSUS
19th May 2012, 15:22
Autoland? it look precise

OFSO
19th May 2012, 15:59
All those scoops and flaps and doors opening.....reminds me of Tommy Lee Jones' Ford POS in the original "Men in Black" - and with "Promised Land" playing on the 8 track I know which I'd rather have !

ELVIS HAS DEFINITELY NOT LEFT THIS BUILDING.

Loose rivets
19th May 2012, 16:40
All of the above apply . . . erm, except about Elvis, don't know about him.


I hope the gas-filled struts are better than the ones on my little BMW. Number of times I've had that slap me nut.:*

I use stick to supplement them. Thinks, could the pilot reach round to take such a prop out? Just imagine it slamming shut.

???????? Gulp! (the engine and the pilot) Period of strangled noises, then the tide coming up the sides of the canopy.





Ban Edit notices:*

G-CPTN
19th May 2012, 17:44
This thing looks to me like a right bodge-up.
Whereas the Harrier was graceful . . .

Lyman
19th May 2012, 18:26
I sense a seriously and extensively photoshopped effort at humor.

A very expensive airboat, minus the air dams and a guy in front to catch alligators in the swamps of Florida.

sayin'

Milo Minderbinder
19th May 2012, 18:49
I don't think an airboat is going to skip off a ski ramp.....

http://www.baysearchandrescue.org.uk/files/cache/80f776246634746fdc2a194a5a8f2f5b.jpg

Um... lifting...
20th May 2012, 00:44
I'm guessing your exposure to actual airboats is somewhat limited.

ydpF611HD_4&feature=related

Tinstaafl
20th May 2012, 01:08
That must do terrible things to the hull's serviceable lifespan.

Milo Minderbinder
20th May 2012, 01:25
"I'm guessing your exposure to actual airboats is somewhat limited."

Agreed - though I've been pretty impressed watching the one pictured out in Morecambe Bay
Quite remarkable what they do with it - but it can't fly off a ski jump!

OFSO
20th May 2012, 08:19
Shy Talk, you are so right. Huge billion pound aircraft & transport systems, and also how many nuclear subs is the UK going to build - did I hear four ? And for what. Couple of guys in Afghanistan with a missile launcher or an IED couldn't care less about a nuclear sub.

But enough small fast transport systems with weapons mounted and enough guys to run them (aye, there's the rub, guys cost money) would scare the brown stuff out of 'em.

Lyman
20th May 2012, 08:49
shy talk, OFSO

Pints! My point, exactly. Crazy expensive weapons like this turkey are an insult to one's intelligence, and one's tax dough. Perhaps some will buy the "Fallout" technology, the fan is impressive. Weapons gross, range, and common sense make this program a boondoggle. Someone has (access to) more money than sense.

very old flyer
20th May 2012, 14:54
Well, I think it looks better than a Harrier! It is a quantum leap forward in capability, and will add greatly the the tactical flexibility of the USMC. Its cost may be the biggest problem.

chksix
21st May 2012, 16:22
That seagull scoop is just a disaster waiting to happen. Is the fan likely to surge without it? I'd recommend sideways opening doors.

I guess the door can be ejected with explosive bolts incase the hydraulic ram fails.

Matari
21st May 2012, 17:09
Early versions had sideways opening lift fan doors.

Maybe some engineers already thought this through?

http://navy-matters.beedall.com/images/x35b-02.jpg

Doctor Cruces
21st May 2012, 17:23
I think sideways opening would be better. Just imagine the drag factor of that huge airbrake whilst trying an STO at max takeoff. Looks like the control surfaces are struggling as it is (as said by many already).

:(

G-CPTN
21st May 2012, 17:33
Maybe the 'aerofoil' shape of the fuselage creates a low-pressure area that starves the fan of air?