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racedo
16th May 2012, 18:12
Mate who is in finance in the process of recruiting an Accountant for a 9-12 month maternity cover.

He went to 4 national agencies with job based in South West London on decent money.

What has shocked him though is that he received 15 CVs, most he figured could do the job but he will only interview 4 ......

Only 2 of the 15 were Brits which he said was a shock to him as given the crap about unemployment he expected a higher proportion.

Puzzled whether this is the picture others have seen.

rgbrock1
16th May 2012, 18:36
Although not in accounting I work in the IT field.

Recently my company here in the U.S. advertised for a Desktop Support Technician. I was told the company received 173 Resumes for this position. 10 of them were from Americans.

Sir George Cayley
16th May 2012, 19:02
Despite the politically correct minefield this thread could stray into, race could be at the bottom of this.

My experience of contact with people in a variety of jobs is similar. Domestic staff are often East European - nothing appears to be too much for them and their happy polite disposition is a tonic.

Look how many medical staff come from overseas. A recent spell in hospital saw me attended to by a Rumanian House Doctor, a Filipino Staff Nurse and the rest of the nurses from a variety of African states. The only "English" staff member was a viperous bitch.:sad:

It may be a sweeping statement but are British non workers in the Benefit trap?

Lastly, the MV Empire Windrush brought Afro-Caribbean immigrant workers to the UK in the late 40's "to do the jobs UK workers won't do". Is there a parallel here?

In my own company we have sections struggling to recruit. Plenty of interest but no appropriate qualifications or experience.

I think growth needs two things at least, some level of inflation and increasing employment. If the supply of labour comes from abroad so be it.

SGC (now where's my tinfoil hat?)

rgbrock1
16th May 2012, 19:48
Here in the U.S. part of the problem lies with the employers and the current, dismal, labor market.

Often an employer will advertise for a position requiring in-depth knowledge of a lot of different areas, sort of like a jack-of-all-trades. (and master of none, is the way I look at it.) However, these all-knowing and all-powerful positions pay peanuts.

So who will take a position for peanuts? Either someone straight out of school with no other prospects OR, someone who thinks said peanuts is a lot of money compared to where he or she comes from.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
16th May 2012, 20:11
My sister has recently re-entered the UK job market now the kids are all at school, so I have been updated on this recently. Her hubby is also an accountant.
Corporate governance standards appear to be dropping rapidly. There seem to be a lot of firms looking for someone to carry the can if it goes belly up. Good accountants are trying to sit tight in a halfway decent job.

Relocation costs are also a biggie - IF you can sell at all. No-one is going to move for a temp job.

After a couple of scares, she is now happily employed with a top firm.

stuckgear
16th May 2012, 20:37
Mate who is in finance in the process of recruiting an Accountant for a 9-12 month maternity cover.

He went to 4 national agencies with job based in South West London on decent money.

What has shocked him though is that he received 15 CVs, most he figured could do the job but he will only interview 4 ......

Only 2 of the 15 were Brits which he said was a shock to him as given the crap about unemployment he expected a higher proportion.

Puzzled whether this is the picture others have seen.



a good friend of mine, known him nearly 20 years, completed a degree with reputable grades in macro-economics at LSE. been made redundant 4 times in 5 years. SOP is join company, brings his contacts into the business and before any statutory employment laws come into effect, make him redundant. the last company made him 'redundant' even though he had exceeded targets and brought in the company's biggest client and non-performers stayed on.

racedo
16th May 2012, 21:08
Note the comments, race not a part of it as company recruits someone to do the job, he told me pay is circa 40-45 k so its decent money he just stunned at the mix and availability of suitable candidates.

Could be just agencies he has used but they national ones so would expect a decent spread.

They didn't advertise in media but this he said this is the norm.

osmosis
17th May 2012, 07:06
Mainstream employment listings: farcical and full of grammatical and spelling errors. If you want some lunchtime entertainment, read the Oz ones.

The best spelling mistake yet? The requirement for the applicant to have good personable skills and repour. Little wonder no-one of any quality responds to such rubbish.

Fifteen CV s from an employment agent? They have GOT to be kidding.

stuckgear
17th May 2012, 07:49
fox3 makes a valid point as does osmosis.

may recruitment companies dont or cannot communicate the job functions, or even the company, or even categorise the industry itself so in terms of prospective candidate of a certain professional level, if they cannot communicate an actual and fairly accurate JD, it's just fishing.

then for a 9-12 month mat. leave cover, is it 9 months or 12 months? no one is going to relocate for a short term contract and then people of profesional level will likely have a family and commitments, moreso they will have preference for a full time job, not to go through the whole recruitment process for a professional role only to find themselves jobless again in a year.

unless the position is of a wage that mitigates the downsides, the potential candidates are going to be thin on the ground, be transitory workers, retired or desparate.

many jobs right now are asking for skill and experience levels way above the payscales offered.

pay peanuts, you get monkeys.

Victor Inox
17th May 2012, 08:00
Plenty of interest but no appropriate qualifications or experience.

Try finding any young employees in the manufacturing industry with an internationally competitive and completed apprenticeship. Saw a programme on TV the other day about a Daimler-Benz subsidiary in the UK. The HR manager said they had given up on looking for candidates for apprenticeships, because applicants simply did not have the skills necessary (based on the same profile as used to select apprentices at their German factories).

Alloa Akbar
17th May 2012, 08:22
I'll second that..

My company is always on the lookout for good quality, time served CNC Machinists / programmers.. Can we find any? No. We offer decent rates and up to a 60 hour week so the lads can make up to 55k making complex parts for the biggest names in aerospace and Formula 1 racing.. Our best recruits have been two Polish chaps ("North" and "South" :ok:) great work ethic, tremendous skill and bloody nice chaps to boot.

We are an SME and in 8 years we have never had anyone walk out the door for any other reason than retirement, I have no idea why it's so difficult to find good guys. :confused:

Fox3WheresMyBanana
17th May 2012, 09:14
A point on Employment agencies. My brother-in-law recently discovered, after a random phone call, his agency was submitting his CV for jobs he'd told them he didn't want just to pad out their submissions. He changed agencies

p.s. Alloa - got any apprentices?

Alloa Akbar
17th May 2012, 09:37
Fox3 - Yes mate, 4 of them at various stages and 2 just completed who are staying with us. Apprentices are the way ahead, but our ever expanding workload demand extra resource which as I said, is difficult to find.

Ancient Observer
17th May 2012, 10:15
Agencies.

Job agencies make estate agents look holy. The whole sector is full of wide-boys, chancers, and people who failed to get in to HR. I mean, most HR folk are useless, so if you are too useless to get in to HR, join a job agency. Many Agency staff are paid legal minimum, and depend on commission to earn any more.
Commission does different things to different people......................

If you want a recommendation about a Finance only search person, (MBA and FCA) PM for details.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
17th May 2012, 10:48
Someone I know attended the training course for a major employment agency. One of the first sessions produced the 'fact' that 90% of people lie on their CVs. A show of hands indicated 95% of the trainees had lied on theirs.

One of the problems with current HR is that it basically doesn't recognise or credit transferable skills, which seriously affects ex-mil types. As far as I can see, it is cowardice on behalf of HR, or an inability to recognise or evaluate quality when they see it.


Alloa - apprentices :D:D:D

AlpineSkier
17th May 2012, 11:24
Fox3

You're right about the transferability and lack of vision by agencies.

Unfortunately the favourite candidate for most companies will be their major competitor's best salesman/ product developer etc so that they can pull him in on day 1, do HR procedures and get business cards printed and then throw him straight into the fray on day 2 and start "contributing" instead of having months of "non-productive " training .

Another variant on the short-termism of ( US/UK) companies that is often complained about in the media.

Pitts2112
17th May 2012, 12:45
After my job hunting experiences this time around, I can confirm that the lawyers are getting a reprieve. Headhunters and every HR tw*t I can get my hands on will now be the first ones against the wall when the revolution comes.

stuckgear
17th May 2012, 15:20
Someone I know attended the training course for a major employment agency. One of the first sessions produced the 'fact' that 90% of people lie on their CVs. A show of hands indicated 95% of the trainees had lied on theirs.


isn't that interesting. many people don't have a need to 'lie' on their CV's but if recruitment agents B/S theirs then they are not looking objectively at other peoples.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
17th May 2012, 17:34
I agree with the recent posts.

The agencies tend to assume that everyone lies on their CV, and an ex-mil one looks totally unbelievable, especially since the agents also tend to assume nobody can be better than them.

I used to have to work with a guy who trained as a barrister then ran a recruitment agency. If you met him, he would instantly become top of your summary execution 'to do' list.

I presume you mean to reprieve lawyers in the postponement, not the cancellation of punishment sense.

Getting guys who don't need training is myopic. I have done two sales jobs, and in both cases became top regional salesman whilst still in training. And that included my bosses who'd been in the business over 10 years, one of whom had been poached directly from the competition. Unfortunately my techniques were not transferable, as I was ethical.;)

stuckgear
17th May 2012, 18:29
I used to have to work with a guy who trained as a barrister then ran a recruitment agency.


that's ironic, as in the UK many recruitment agents probably previously trained as Baristas before changing career paths !

Fox3WheresMyBanana
17th May 2012, 18:35
Frothing at the mouth was about all this guy could do; I doubt he could make a decent cappuccino. I know his brown nose wasn't caused by 'crema'.

Dan Gerous
17th May 2012, 18:48
Someone I know attended the training course for a major employment agency. One of the first sessions produced the 'fact' that 90% of people lie on their CVs. A show of hands indicated 95% of the trainees had lied on theirs.

During my spell of unemployment last year, I attended one of those agencies you get palmed off to by the jobcentre. I had my CV looked at and ridiculed, and was basically told you've got to tell lies to get a job. The knob head who was my advisor, didn't take to kindly to the fact that I said it was wrong, as, if you claim you can do something, then you better be able to do it. His smart arse reply was, get through the door first and worry about that later.

stuckgear
17th May 2012, 18:57
Not only that Dan, but he was recommending you make a material misrepresentation, which upon being discovered would involve termination for doing so and possibly subject to legal recourse.

what a :mad:ing moron.

rgbrock1
17th May 2012, 19:19
Some of the employment agencies, or recruiters, here in the U.S. are no better. Many lie, recommend lying ("but I didn't tell you that"), haven't a clue, etc.

I always get a kick out of recruiters who contact me with offers of employment, or the possibility of the same, in a job I am entirely unqualified for or have no experience in. Have you even read my Resume' you bonehead?