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rgbrock1
7th May 2012, 22:08
According to a recently released report in The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, at current rates 42% of all Americans will be considered obese by the year 2030. This would cost an additional $550 billion in medical expenditures.

The report further concludes that by that same year - 2030 - 11% of Americans will be considered severely obese. Which is considered to be at least 100 lbs over normal weight or a body mass index over 40!!!!!

Go McDonald's!!!!!

Solution?

http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/Uploads/Graphics/338/04/338-0401223849-Fat_People.jpg

Or, this?

https://encrypted-tbn1.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS1JtDXO09L9Mn-R-XEOFVkCJwuPjT1O5R3SFjiQCafOoN66Ujesw

tony draper
7th May 2012, 22:29
That assumes a continuing reasonably affluent lifestye,the way things are shaping up we could all be in for some very thin times and a lot of thin people, by 2030 might be the only fat folks about will be the local warlord and his minions.
:uhoh:

RedhillPhil
7th May 2012, 22:30
I don't think that we're very far behind looking around the town centre this morning.

tony draper
7th May 2012, 22:32
Those whom the gods wish to destroy they first make fat.:E

rgbrock1
7th May 2012, 22:33
Well, RedhillPhil, not knowing that from these shores then perhaps this might do for our cousins on the other shore:

http://antidieter.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/headless-obese-2.jpg

What a quote, Tony D!!! I like it. :ok::ok::ok:

Seldomfitforpurpose
7th May 2012, 22:35
I don't think that we're very far behind looking around the town centre this morning.

One of the downsides of the 'special relationship' is that where they lead we generally follow :uhoh:

Edited to add I genuinely believe there are more upsides than downsides :ok:

rgbrock1
7th May 2012, 22:39
Hey, sffp, don't blame us. Blame....

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/h-1Quu2GYHM/0.jpg

SMT Member
7th May 2012, 22:47
Mate of mine went to the US for the first time recently, and he came back shocked at how big people, and not just some but the vast majority, were. Second shock was the size of portions at restaurants; he found like the rest of us that half a starter is more than enough in most cases, and was quite taken back by how the locals would tuck into mountains of food without a care in the world.

He told a story about how they passed a 300lbs fella, who was walking from car parking to the entrance. They drove past him, up the the entrance dropping someone off, then back 500 yards past the large guy to park and walk back. Being visitors they needed to be signed in, badged up and undergo extra security checks. Having completed all that, the big guy walks in and looks like he's about to collapse - he'd walked all of 200 yards in 20 minutes. Was in his mid 30ies, unlikely to live to see 40.

tony draper
7th May 2012, 22:53
Mother nature getting her own back because we in the affluent west have short circuited evolution with our antibiotics and vaccinations.:rolleyes:

ZOOKER
7th May 2012, 23:31
A Caledonian colleague introduced me to the splendidly descriptive term, 'Munta'.
So, is the fattest state Muntana?

It's not just the USof A though.

Anyone going to the Waddlington Airshow this year?
If it's a hot day, it's a real field trip.

goudie
8th May 2012, 00:05
Shopping in the likes of Costco, where the practice of buying in bulk is relatively cheaper, must be a factor in making it easy for people to over-eat.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
8th May 2012, 00:17
It's not simply portion size, it is the fact that there are generally either no small portions sold, or they are at a ridiculous price differential, e.g. Obesity Burger $5, double everything for only $6.

We have a few 'Texan' sized Canadians, but at least my locally run cafe has a "half breakfast" of 1 egg, 2 small sausages and 1 round of toast for $3, which is actually a fraction under half the price of the full breakfast. And they'll do a bowl of granola for $1.50. This is the solution, in my view.

Happy to report that the local Burger King has shut down, but 2 new small local cafe's have started up.

11Fan
8th May 2012, 00:29
Look on the bright side. When we run out of food, there will still be plenty to eat.

Tastes of chicken.

pudoc
8th May 2012, 00:37
If most people become obese, at least I'll look super duper hot and be in all the magazines when my average body becomes 'the not-norm' and therefore sexy.

Let 'em be fat! :D

G-CPTN
8th May 2012, 00:51
If most people become obese, won't that become the norm?


Likewise as more and more people become moronical, won't the general level of IQ depress, so that intelligent people will earn higher IQ ratings?

A meringue?

ExSp33db1rd
8th May 2012, 01:28
Yes, the USA restaurant portion size is a big issue.

Shortly after I met Mrs. ExS. we were in Waikiki, and went from the beach for a lunchtime snack at a very smart restaurant, which I thought wouldn't even let us in, us in beach wear, albeit dry, which didn't match the white damask tablecloths and waiters wearing bow ties - at lunchtime ! but Mrs.ExS, being American and not at all bothered about any sort of 'class' distinction marched in and scanned the elegant, and expensive, menu. We'll have a hamburger,and split it, she said. I wanted to crawl under the table, but the waiter didn't bat an eyelid and even brought the half hamburgers on separate plates, each of which was an adequate meal in itself.

I would prefer to pay half the cost for half the food, but I guess the restaurants would soon go out of business if everybody did that, but 'splitting' a dish seems to be quite acceptable in the US for those of us who don't want to waste the money and the food when a 'doggy bag ' is not an option. We do it all the time, but it doesn't seem as acceptable in other Countries - imagine trying to get a Parisian waiter to oblige !

I have a two word diet. Eat Less - and I'm still putting on weight ! ( but I do like my ice cream ! My aged aunt said that she would die of Cream )

Um... lifting...
8th May 2012, 03:04
While it's been many years since I have been to this place (which I did under duress, but yet it is considered by many to be a fine restaurant), I recall that every item on the menu (which is entirely a la carte) is enormous.
You will note that they enthuse about their 'corn-fed' beef, which I find curious, as beef cattle aren't evolved to do well on corn at any stage of life. The meat is fat-laden (marbled is the term of choice) and served in enormous butter-coated slabs.

Ruth's Chris Steak House (http://www.ruthschris.com/Menu/Signature-Steaks)

I did eat in the last year or so at this place below while on business. Note the size of the steaks, and the prices associated with each size (Fox3 touched on this concept above). For those who have forgotten their avoirdupois weights, 3.5 oz is approximately 100 grams.

So, the smallest steak on the menu (the petit filet) is 230g, and costs $31. Show me a 55kg woman who can throw that back (and stay at that weight) and I'll show you someone who does a fair bit of physical labor.

The next smallest (the filet) is 345g, and costs $35.

The largest (granted, it's for two) is a stunning 1.36 kilogram slab of meat, 3 pounds, and costs $80. Long ago my mother would prepare a 3 pound roast for our family of 6 on Sunday and my father would get at least a couple of sandwiches out of it during the ensuing week.

Untitled Document (http://www.rootssteakhouse.com/menu-dinner.html)

It's my country, and it's positively bizarre, but it's no mystery why people's arses look like two rhinos copulating under a blanket. People order this stuff, routinely.

And nobody looks like they are enjoying so much as a bite of it.

Ultralights
8th May 2012, 04:02
Hey, sffp, don't blame us. Blame....

hey, i hav never seen anyone force someone to eat Maccas, or all of a large meal they have purchased.

its called personal responsibility. sadly not many people left have it. only 1 person is responsible for the amount of crap and food you shovel down your throat. :rolleyes:

probes
8th May 2012, 04:23
And nobody looks like they are enjoying so much as a bite of it.

yep, that's interesting. I've noticed that when dining out with friends from the US - different items are ordered without real appetite, like routine. We even discussed it once - where have I got the feeling that I should eat what I order/put on my plate? Meaning I do not want too much, if I have a choice. Guess it was our grandparents who knew what shortage meant. Like them saying: one doesn't play with food; or: don't take more than you want etc.
But the really terrifying thing is the fat acceptance society, or what was it called.

reynoldsno1
8th May 2012, 05:32
Lived in the US for 3 years, with mrsr1 who is a US size 0 (petite) (no kidding ....). We cottoned on fairly quickly that we could order a meal and two sets of utensils and a spare plate without any disdainful looks...
We once went to one of dem "Country Kitchen" all you can eat for $14 places once - 'twas eye opening, nay, bulging ...

To quote John Pinette, the somewhat adipose (but very funny) American comedian - "Salad is not food, salad is something that goes with food..."

jabird
8th May 2012, 05:45
But the really terrifying thing is the fat acceptance society, or what was it called.

That would be NAAFA.

It isn't just about what you eat, how (or if) you burn off what you eat is another key part of the deal.

In that respect, Americans have Mr Ford to thank as much as Mr Kroc.

Juud
8th May 2012, 09:24
rgbrock1, you´re taking a US centric view here. ;)
More accurate thread title would be United Nations of Obesity.
Like in many other ways, the States are ahead of other nations, but the world is catching up.
Clearly visible on board; we now have the fat people problem on flights to the ME, the FE and South America. And it´s always been evident on Africa flights.

Interesting article in Newsweek recently about why the traditional approaches are not working; well worth a read. Link (http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/05/06/why-the-campaign-to-stop-america-s-obesity-crisis-keeps-failing.html).

It also clearly demonstrates why Drape´s postulation is overly simplistic and untrue.
That assumes a continuing reasonably affluent lifestye,the way things are shaping up we could all be in for some very thin times and a lot of thin people, by 2030 might be the only fat folks about will be the local warlord and his minions.
:uhoh:
versus
The conventional wisdom these days—promoted by government, obesity researchers, physicians, and probably your personal trainer as well—is that we get fat because we have too much to eat and not enough reasons to be physically active. But then why were the PC- and Big Mac–-deprived Depression-era kids fat? How can we blame the obesity epidemic on gluttony and sloth if we easily find epidemics of obesity throughout the past century in populations that barely had food to survive and had to work hard to earn it?

It´s not just calories in and out.

tony draper
8th May 2012, 09:35
I reckon tiz a genetic change, humanity has ceased evolving upwards striving for hight and is now expanding in the horizontal plane.
:)

skwinty
8th May 2012, 09:38
Have you ever seen pictures of fat people in a concentration camp?

Sprogget
8th May 2012, 09:44
Yes I have, but they had guns, so therefore there must be a correlation between guns & obesity.

It's a good point though Skwinty. My mum points out that being born in 1941 meant that she and everyone she knew grew up eating veg grown in the garden, rabbit, Lord Wooltons pie & either walking or cycling everywhere. No fat people around in her youth.

Isn't it completely obvious? The not so secret secret is burn more calories than you consume, the simplest of equations. If however, you give everyone a car, a 50" tv, central heating, sedentary jobs & endless supplies of crappy food made with high amounts of sugar, salt & fat then people will succumb in large numbers to indolence and all that it brings.

skwinty
8th May 2012, 09:51
Here is an interesting article...if you indulge you bulge,,,lol

Why are Americans fat? : The New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2009/07/20/090720crbo_books_kolbert?currentPage=1)

Captain Sand Dune
8th May 2012, 09:58
Seen lotsa fat Brits, Kiwis and Aussies too.....................

skwinty
8th May 2012, 10:01
Yes, it's not just an American problem.

It is more a poor choice of food types and lack of exercise which is a common human failing.

RedhillPhil
8th May 2012, 10:03
Have you ever seen pictures of fat people in a concentration camp?

Hah, you just beat me to it! Last time I said that in company there was a shocked silence. People just can't take the truth nowadays. Funny how the obese always have "a slow metabolism" or "It's my genes" or "I've got a glandular problem".
None of 'em ever say, "it's because the hole at the top is bigger than the hole at the bottom".

Sprogget
8th May 2012, 10:10
Remember, it's your hands, not your glands.

Worrals in the wilds
8th May 2012, 10:10
Everywhere you go these days, you see people eating. Go to the movies, go to the shops, go to the motor show, go to a train station; there are people eating 'snack' foods that contain the same number of calories as a full meal, usually from fat and sugar. :ooh:

Petrol (gas) stations have more food than car products, newsagents have racks of the aforementioned 'snack' foods and rows of soft drinks. Everywhere you turn there's food for sale.

I lost a reasonable amount of weight by eating three smallish square meals (not always the healthiest of food, but less than I had been eating) and two serves of fruit, and rigorously staying away from 'snack' food. Every now and then I fall off the wagon and the number on the scales goes up. :sad:

I think we need to get back to the 'food is for mealtimes' concept our grandparents subsribed to, then I suspect we could eat the same greasy lamb chops, bacon and butter they did without ending up hippo size.

jabird
8th May 2012, 11:54
RHP,

None of 'em ever say, "it's because the hole at the top is bigger than the hole at the bottom".

Not many, but our "system" isn't set up to encourage personal responsibility. I did put on a large amount of weight over the last four years and I can legitimately say that weight gain is both a result of my illness and the medications used to treat it.

However, the way I see it, that just means I have to try harder to maintain a stable weight and then take it off. At no stage throughout this process has anyone other than my consultant suggested that I am heavier than I should be, despite having regular check ups.

I can now at last say my weight is coming down and that I am a bit tubby, rather than a fat f***.

Anyway, off to the carvery, on two wheels, will probably need to keep going for at least another hour afterwards.

anotherthing
8th May 2012, 12:06
Although America leads the way in obesity, the UK isn't that far behind.

Must admit though, when in Florida last Winter, I can honestly say I never had on good meal, despite going to some supposedly half decent restaurants. Was extremely disappointed, though the hotel, TPC Sawgrass Marriott, did very good, and varied breakfasts. Maybe therein lies the problem... people are used to eating crap food, and lots of it?

Reduce portion sizes, increase taste and nutrition and charge the same. Surely peoples taste buds will eventually wean them off crap?

MagnusP
8th May 2012, 12:12
I miss roast pork. (Stick with me here.)

MrsP was never an enthusiast, but would put up with it on Sunday's menu from time to time. However, since her Mum moved to Edinburgh and now has Sunday dinner with us, I can't cook it as it upsets her tum. I have to resort to a few cold slices from the butcher's cold meat counter. Not the same.

However, jabird's carvery mention has given me the idea to suggest to MrsP that we take her Mum out for lunch some Sundays to somewhere where I can pig out on pig (More crackling, please. You call that a portion of roast spuds? Think again, young man.) while not upsetting either on the distaff.

Thank you for the inspiration.

Tableview
8th May 2012, 12:18
I found some old school photos the other day. The majority of my peers at school were skinny little runts like me (I weighed 50-58 kilos from the age of about 15 until my mid 30's when too many long flights and business class meals and expensive hotel meals spoiled my waistline!) with only about 6 'fatties' on a house photo of roughly 100 people (and I remember who they were!)

Now I see the majority of kids in the age range roughly 8-16 are what we would then have called fat, and the skinnies are in a minority.

Sprogget
8th May 2012, 13:11
But it is NOT a one way street.
Never, Ever Give Up. Arthur's Inspirational Transformation! - YouTube

beaufort1
8th May 2012, 13:28
Interesting thread.
One thing that has struck me is that as a youngster, there is no way my parents would have let me walk around eating in the street. It just wasn't done. I'm not sure when this attitude seemed to relax. ;)

corsair
8th May 2012, 13:37
It's not just America. We are following not far behind on this side of the pond. It's also related to your status in society. The poorer you are both financially and educationally. The more the chance of being fat. In my son's school which draws most of it's children from a middle class background. It's notable how few kids are even slightly overweight. The same applies to their yummy mummies and in the related secondary school the teenagers, boys and girls are skinny although noticeably tall.

Not so in other schools in the area.

Being the Father of two boys it is difficult to get them to eat properly. It would be fairly easy to feed them fast food all the time. Clearly that's what happens. My two are always hungry, complaining about their tummy rumbling ten minutes after lunch. If we filled that gap with sweets and drinks instead of fruit like we try to do. They would soon be little roly polys.

It's easy enough to blame McDonalds or restaurants for serving big portions. But they are only responding to customer preferences. The problem starts in the home. There does need to be better education on the subject. Something like the Jamie Oliver campaign a while ago.

Um... lifting...
8th May 2012, 13:45
Reduce portion sizes, increase taste and nutrition and charge the same. Surely peoples taste buds will eventually wean them off crap?

We're hard-wired for fat, salt, and sugar. Many studies have indicated that your lovely thoughts (which I happen to subscribe to) are wishful thinking for the population at large. You have to want something more than you want to stuff your face to do that something. And stuffing one's face is easy. Very easy.

The food scientists have spent their careers perfecting delivery systems for fat, salt, and sugar. Even the packaging is designed to maximize delivery.

Think of drinking beer from a bottle. It can only come out of the bottle so fast.

Think of drinking a Starbuck's Frappuccino from a bottle. It comes out of the bottle just as fast as gravity can accelerate it.

green granite
8th May 2012, 13:52
It always amazes me the number of fat nurses and other hospital staff you see while sitting waiting for your appointment.

tony draper
8th May 2012, 14:00
One prefers one's nurses to be on the plump side.:rolleyes:

Um... lifting...
8th May 2012, 14:12
One prefers not to visit nurses in their work habitat.

rgbrock1
8th May 2012, 14:14
Although I certainly agree with the source of the problem lying in the types and quantities many people eat, I also think there are far more underlying issues which need to be addressed.
I'd like to sum up my ideas on this issue thusly:

1. Lack of exercise.
Many, many Americans do not exercise. We're not talking about having to do it on a daily basis. But even 3-4 times per week would suffice.

2. Laziness.
How many people get in their cars to drive 1/2 mile to pick up some "little extras" at the corner market? And then, naturally, drive the 1/2 mile back. Is this really necessary? Wouldn't it be so much better, and healthier, to walk the 1 mile round-trip?
It really doesn't take a Triathlete to walk a 1 mile round-trip.

3. Soda.
Many, many people drink soda. And not the "diet" type either.
Anyone ever see the amount of carbohydrates in a 12 oz. can of Coca-Cola? Last time I look there are 35 grams. That's a lot.

4. Water.
In my experience few people drink enough water during the day. I know many who don't drink water at all. Very vital to one's well-being, hydration and - believe it or not - in metabolism and digestion.

5. Vitamins.
The B-complex vitamins, and especially Vitamins B6 and B12, are used for many things, one of which is to increase metabolism. So, if one claims to have a slow metabolism - which is quite understandable - try copious amounts of the B-complex vitamins to raise that slovenly metabolism!

6. Time of Day.
Most Americans - don't know about Brits - eat their main meal, dinner, at night. Bad idea. One really should eat lighter at night and try eating the main meal at midday. This way, you have the rest of the day to burn it off as opposed to at night when, after eating, many people become even more sedentary.

Tableview
8th May 2012, 14:25
1 & 2 go together.
Lack of exercise undoubtedly. I see some of the kids being transported to the bus stop ........ 500 metres, and being dropped off at the school gates even if that means sitting in traffic for 10 minutes rather than walking for 3. SWMBO takes her 2.5 litre diesel car to the village, roughly the same distance, even if she has nothing to carry. I walk, and if I have shopping to carry, it goes in a backpack. I often walk to a neighbouring village and back, 10 km, for lunch. I am probably 'lucky' to have the time but then having time is often about organising one's life better.

3. We have a few bottles of Coke in the house - a 6 pack lasts for a month, it's usually my son's friends who drink the stuff. I am often shocked when I go to an office and see people drinking fizzy drinks all day long.

4. Water. It pains me to see how few people drink the stuff that comes from the tap, preferring to pay outrageous prices for water in plastic bottles.

6. Time of day. Some Europeans have their main meal at lunchtime - most notably the French, but obesity is becoming a problem there too because they have replaced the lovely traditional French brasseries with MuckD and Flunch and Quick and so on.

rgbrock1
8th May 2012, 14:41
Tableview:

No you've gotten my going concerning kids being driven to the bus stop. It is an outrage. In our neighborhood for example, each morning on my way to work I drive by the local school bus stop. There is a black SUV of some sort which drives to the bus stop each morning with kids in the back. Older kids going to high school. The house the SUV departs from is located approx. 1/8 of a mile - if that - from the school bus stop.

We live in a very, very rural area. There is absolutely no crime whatsoever. (Aside from Saturday night cow tipping that is!).
So it's not like the parents are trying to protect their kids from some local nut jobs. 1/8 of a mile they are driven to the bus stop. That, to me anyway, is the epitome of sloth-like behavior and lazy in the extreme.

Then again, the same bus that picks up these kids - if you unfortunate enough to get stuck behind it - stops ever 1/4 mile or so to pick up another bunch of high school-aged kids.

Disgusting.

teeteringhead
8th May 2012, 14:56
Lack of exercise undoubtedly. I see some of the kids being transported to the bus stop ........ 500 metres, and being dropped off at the school gates even if that means sitting in traffic for 10 minutes rather than walking for ... indeed so Tableview and rgb - but it has become official now. As I posted on a similar thread a coupla years ago ... There's also a creeping institutionalisation of idleness amongst the youth.

Most of the young in our village are bussed to the nearest comp (for cousins - Public High School) which is about 6 or 7 miles away.

When the Teeterettes went to said school (last one left about 10 years ago) there was one school 'bus stop in the village for the kids. Village is I guess about half-a-mile across, ergo max walk to 'bus stop 400 yds ish. Had a stroll to get the paper from the village shop the other morning when off work, and noticed there are now four different school 'bus stops in the village, for the same 'bus, going to the same school ...... :ugh:

hellsbrink
8th May 2012, 15:29
Now, I feel like throwing a spanner in the works.

Now, one has never tried to claim to be some "Adonis". If you've ever had someone being dragged away from you by their Guide Dog, you would understand what I mean.

But this is the thing, I always was "rotund", my whole life. Now, I grew up in an age before McVomits were really invented in the UK, and being around at that time in a small town meant you were active, and I mean ACTIVE. Running around like loons as kids in a dead end street, down at the park playing football or running around like loons, cycling around like a loon everywhere when first set of wheels were gotten, doing a weekly 15 mile bike run on country roads at the age of 12, dog would get a 4-mile walk every day. Pretty much a "normal" childhood and nothing like the sedentary lifestyle today. Food was home cooked (especially soup) and mostly local produced, especially meat, and plenty veg were home grown. I could keep up with the best of them and I guess that nowadays I would be called "hyperactive" (ok, coffee at the age of 8 was maybe not a good idea).

But I was still "round". I was still "fat". How does that work in with the theories about calories and exercise?

rgbrock1
8th May 2012, 15:32
hellsbrink:

Slow metabolism.

charliegolf
8th May 2012, 15:54
220 children aged 3-11 in my school. Recent height/weight (and vision, but that's not related) assesments resulted in 8 (3.6 %?) having a letter about their weight. That fits well with an 'eyeball' survey I did about a year ago when the topic came up. Not bad, I think.

Give it time though!

CG

WhatsaLizad?
8th May 2012, 16:02
As an US citizen, I won't apologize for much, but I will beg and grovel for the world's forgiveness for our cigarette and rap/gangsta' culture exports, and for our food policy.

What's happening in the US is the result of decades of cheap oil and large corporate agriculture businesses manipulating goverment policy.

The main problem is corn subsidies. The crap is grown into mountains the size of the pyramids courtesy of the US taxpayer. Since it is subsidized, cheap and plentiful, meat producers have a cheap supply of feed which then artificially keeps the meat supply cheap. Same goes for all the sugar drinks and the endless list of high frutcose corn syrup products that would taste like crap without it or be too expensive if produced from sugars grown on a pure free competition market based system.

Another little known fact is other healthy vegetables are not subisidized. in fact, from what I've read, farmers are prohibited from growing other crops if receiving the corn subsidy. Gee, how do you think that rule happened? :ugh: In the end, if you tried to eat healthy, it would be cost prohibitive for low income families to buy fresh vegetables compared to a McD's fat meal.

Another factor affecting the portion size is cheap energy. Cheap is always relative of course.( Just forget the hidden tax of 12 nuclear aircraft carriers and hundreds of billions of expenses in maintaing a military presence in the Middle East while we get a majority of our oil from other sources. :ugh:) With cheap oil, the portion size gets alot bigger. It also encourages the use of cheap transportation with everything from cars to golf carts to electric scooters instead of walking.

If you want to see the ultimate damage, go to Disney in Orlando when it's jammed with Americans (not skinny Brazilians, although that's good at times). You'll see legions of obese 30 something parents pushing obese kids in a stroller. They can't even rent a single stroller for their fat kid as he/she is chauffered from ride to ride. They rent the double wide ones made for two kids so one fat kid has a place to place his 32 oz sugar drink and his electric fan to keep cool. It's not unsual to see 6-8 year olds with beer bellys like a portly 45 year year old. you can't even walk through the park when it's jammed with these invalids. At another park, while walking a crowded path we hear beep-beep-beep. Behind us was Ma and Pa American, two overweight but able to walk people, riding the rented scooters through the crowd and demanding that people get out of their way. The best part was they both had cigarettes in their mouths. I shook my head saying, "Their's Obama care, zero personal responsibility and everybody else pays".

It's going to be seriously ugly in 20 years (or less) when the diabetes from all this sugar intake explodes.

Groundbased
8th May 2012, 16:37
CG, your experience tallies with mine. 180 kids at our school (4 - 11) and very few are overweight.

There is some oversight of what they eat for lunch and they can't buy or bring in things to eat at playtime.

The problem appears to start once they get to high school. All controls are removed and they have the option to stand around doing nothing at breaktimes, or go out to buy loads of sweets and drinks.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
8th May 2012, 16:44
First boarding school I taught at was on a hillside. Boarding houses up the hill, school and facilities at bottom of hill.
Games/PE almost daily. Change for games in houses.
Lazy kid forgets books? Back up the hill to fetch them!
Only one fat kid (boy) in the school, and he was in the one boarding house at the bottom of hill.
No diet control required.

green granite
8th May 2012, 18:40
From the Torygraph: :ugh::ugh::ugh::ugh::ugh::ugh:

Obesity a 'derogatory' word, says Nice
Doctors tasked with tackling the country's obesity crisis have been told to avoid using the word obese, because it could be considered "unhelpful" or even "derogatory".

A quarter of adults in Britain are now obese, a figure that is due to more than double by 2050. Those from poorer backgrounds are much more likely to be obese than the more affluent.

But a government quango is now advising public health experts drawing up anti-obesity plans around the country to avoid using the 'o' word itself for fear of upsetting people.

Health campaigners last night attacked the softly-softly approach, describing it as "extremely patronising".

Under draft guidance issued by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice), those who are obese should merely be encouraged to get down to a "healthier weight".

Obesity a 'derogatory' word, says Nice - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9252311/Obesity-a-derogatory-word-says-Nice.html)

rgbrock1
8th May 2012, 18:50
Ahhhh, the politically correct crowd at it again. They'll be the death of all of us some day soon. :ugh::ugh::ugh:

Tableview
8th May 2012, 19:14
I wouldn't call them obese. Do you think that someone like this would know the meaning of the word?

I'd call them FFs. And that's being polite. I do understand that there are people who have medical condition that make them obese - I know two - but this type of person ............ please!

http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w497/pprunemike/fatchav.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/happyaslarry/555579432/ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/happyaslarry/555579432/)

Rossian
8th May 2012, 19:28
...the comment by Mr lifting re cattle not eating grain reminded me of a tale I heard from a farmer friend who said that he'd noticed pigs in the same pens as the cattle being fattened on grain during a trip to the US.
The explanation was that the cattle eat the grain but their digestive systems don't cope too well and excrete most of it, undigested. Cattle are indiscriminate shitters.
Pigs on the other hand are omnivores and very clean in their habits and usually crap in one place.
So, the pigs hoover up the semi-digested grain, thus cleaning the pens, and crap neatly in the corner. Thereby making it much easier to keep the stockyards clean.

A win-win all round.

The Ancient Mariner

probes
8th May 2012, 19:39
It really doesn't take a Triathlete to walk a 1 mile round-trip.


one of the Americans working around here was just puzzled by the way of life and said: "In the States you never walk to get somewhere."
Meaning, if you need to work out, you drive to the gym 2 blocks away, and then you drive to the park and walk there :E.

coffee at the age of 8
actually it's recommended for hyperactive kids now (coffee). There was some explanation, don't remember right now.

Juud
8th May 2012, 19:51
http://i1178.photobucket.com/albums/x372/Juud81/Screenshot2012-05-08at84910PM.png

probes
8th May 2012, 19:54
An old one, but ever-ironic:

http://crossfit-ares.typepad.com/.a/6a0133edb6ed76970b0134860e1061970c-800wi

Fox3WheresMyBanana
8th May 2012, 20:13
Up here in the Great White North, we do at least have the excuse of needing a bit of spare fat in case of starvation. We regularly get "marooned in snowdrift, survived for 2 weeks+ without food" stories in winter. I find I put on about a stone and a half in winter, then lose it by July.
People don't tend to mention women carrying a few extra pounds around here, partly because we're so polite, but partly because half our Province's medals in the last Canada Games were for women's wrestling.:ouch:

MagnusP
8th May 2012, 20:42
WhatsaLizad:
As an US citizen, I won't apologize for much, but I will beg and grovel for the world's forgiveness for our cigarette and rap/gangsta' culture exports, and for our food policy.

Nah, not having that. Some baccy extracts are medicinally important, and there's a lot of good rap around (and I'm in the 7th decade, FFS). I'll accept your apology for the rest (gracious, eh?) except for some of your food/agriculture policy, which I think has helped in leading food production around the world.

I'm in a good mood this evening. :ok:

rgbrock1
8th May 2012, 20:47
Had a pint or two did we, Magnus?!!!!!!

MagnusP
8th May 2012, 21:08
Working on it, RGB. MrsP has the knitting coven in residence, so I've done some work in the garage and am now hiding in the office with 3 guitars (+ amps, FX &c), the computer and a couple of beers. I fully expect the cat to come skulking through here any time now in a show of solidarity. :ok:

The mad little sod may take the opportunity to attack as many balls of wool as he can while he has the chance. Traitor.

anotherthing
8th May 2012, 21:11
Nooooooooo Magnus, you can't drink, it's really bad for you and causes cancer.

Oops, sorry - wrong thread :}

MagnusP
8th May 2012, 21:12
Your alter ego is KAG, and I claim my five pounds. :p

1DC
8th May 2012, 21:53
I think it was yesterday that i heard on the news that Britain is now the most obese nation in Europe.
I was born in 1940 and don't recall being hungry (my parents probably went hungry for me). In my class at school we were nearly all skinny but their was always a fat lad and i am sure he didn't get any more to eat than we did.
Today my grandchildren are just as skinny as i was, they probably eat more but are lucky to get into McDonalds three times a year. Their Mother always walked them to and from school and now they are old enough they walk themselves.After the original moan about why they were "the only one's walking to school" they took it as the norm. They drink coke whenever they can. Grand daughter has gone to dance class since she was about 5 and grandson plays in a football team in the winter and a cricket team in the summer.
Last Easter they went to Orlando and could not believe how large the other kids were, the thing that surprised them more than anything was how much the other kids could eat. My grand kids ate more in that fortnight than they normally would,and enjoyed it, but in every diner or restaurant they would be pointing out to each other how much more the other kids were eating and wondering how they managed it...
My sister is in her eighties, she remembers WWII and her late husband served with some distinction although he never talked about it. Remembering the war is important to her ( and me). Some years ago i took her to America because she wanted to go, we went to the places that she had dreamed about and always wanted to visit. After about a week she suddenly stopped in the middle of the street and said "These people couldn't fight another world war, they aren't fit enough, we needed them the last time how will we manage the next time"
I fancy if she looks around in the UK now she will come to the same conclusion.............

Fox3WheresMyBanana
8th May 2012, 21:59
She's wrong about war fitness. It's often been this bad.
One of my Great Uncles was a PTI during the First World War. Huge numbers of conscripts were very unfit, and needed months of fitness training before they could be handed a rifle.

Malnutrition and skinny then, malnutrition and fat now.

Sprogget
8th May 2012, 22:00
I recall the first time I gave my daughter a drop of Coca Cola - diet only in my house. She would have been about three. She sniffed the beaker, sipped it, then guzzled the lot. This was followed by a belch, then one word...more.

Never under estimate the power of sweet.

MagnusP
8th May 2012, 22:08
Prolly posted this already, but after 2 cans of refreshment I don't care.

Decided to go back to healthy breakfast, so bought a humungous box of bran flakes with sultanas. Wholegrain. Low fat. Semiskimmed milk. All good. Check label - per 30g serving, 15.3g total sugars. Holy Diabetes, Batman!

ExSp33db1rd
8th May 2012, 22:12
Driving kids to school.

I used to cycle 5 miles each way, rain, snow or shine. Didn't do me any harm, except from the occasional head cold as a result of sitting around in wet clothes sometimes when the cycle cape - remember those ? - didn't do its' job properly ( thinks -'elf and safety would probably ban them now on the grounds of interference with the proper control of ones' bike, which was true !)

I'm annoyed that I'm now putting on weight despite trying - slightly - to do something about it, but take heart from having recently been told that 'older' people are genetically predisposed to do so, 'cos we can't keep on with the "Hunting, Gathering" thing and have to rely on the younger members of the family to do so, and therefore there is some doubt as to when the next meal will appear, so we "store" fat against a famine, regardless of what we do.

That's my excuse, anyway.

Tankertrashnav
8th May 2012, 22:26
Certainly agree that being overweight is a bad thing - I've always carried too much weight and blame no-one but myself - not so much an under-active thyoid as an over active fork.

However I have learned to take the various health fads with a pinch of salt (oops, thats another no-no). For example I remember when the cholesterol panic started, and people were told to cut down on eggs - a max of two to three a week were recommended, as I recall. My brother gave up his breakfast egg and stolidly munched his way through muesli for the rest of his life. I continue to eat a minimum of a dozen eggs a week, possibly more, and my cholesterol remains at a steady 4.5. Now we learn that eating high cholesterol food doesnt give you high cholesterol.

I'm sticking to the principle that a little of what you fancy does you good - although I'd concede that a lot of people seem to have substitued "a lot" for "a little".

Tableview
8th May 2012, 22:34
"Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night, half an hour before I went to bed, eat a lump of cold poison, walk 20 miles to school with shoes tied round my neck to save shoeleather ......"

Not quite, but I walked 3 or 4 miles to and from school most days. Not because I didn't have bus money, but because it was the healthy option. That meant keeping the bus money and spending it in the tuck shop!

jabird
8th May 2012, 22:44
Obesity a 'derogatory' word, says Nice

NICE need to stop being so "nice" - because this attitude is actually very harmful.

I could play the excuse game if I wanted:

Lethargy makes me sleep longer and get out less.
It is easy to eat comfort foods and takeaways.
Medication reduces metabolism and lists weight gain as a major side effect.
Lethargy can reduce desire to engage in serious exercise.

These are all valid explanations of why I might put on weight. That is all they are - explanations, not excuses, as if diabetes or heart disease come knocking my way, I can't kindly ask them to go away and come back next week because I didn't have the motivation to do something about it.

What amazes me about the US is that the healthcare system is built around insurance coverage, and premiums should be loaded according to lifestyle and risk factors. Yet with our "free" NHS, we don't have a direct financial incentive to stay well - even more of a reason for NHS staff to be beating their patients with sticks to get more active and to eat more sensibly.

The other societal problems are not just about the food production system or the lack of competitive sport in schools. In the ultimate travesty of the "free market", far too many towns in the US are built around the car, and getting around by other means is nigh on impossible - unless you are "lowlife" enough to be bus dependent. This is not a problem with the existence of the car per se - car ownership in many European countries is on a par with the US or the UK, but it is about taming the car in urban areas so "active" means of transport can be encouraged.

I've said plenty about cycling elsewhere, but walking should never be underestimated as a means of exercise, aswell as a recreational pursuit in its own right and a means of transport, not just a feeder for other mechanised modes.

vulcanised
8th May 2012, 22:45
Similar here. I used to run the 3 or 4 miles home every lunchtime because I didn't like school dinners when I was at junior school. Couldn't afford the bus either.

Also remember just the one fatty in grammar school. Met his parents and remember his dad being huge too.

Worrals in the wilds
8th May 2012, 23:16
...or go out to buy loads of sweets and drinks. Is that during the school day? Wow, we would never have been allowed to do that, and I'm not that old. Once you were on the grounds you stayed there. At lunch time there were nuns on bouncer duty at each entrance, who also screened visitors. They were much scarier than security guards, too. :eek:

We were talking at work the other day about what lunch we all took to school. The norm was a sandwich, a piece of fruit, a fruit or milk drink of some sort and pack of cheese or similar snack for morning tea. Some of the younger ones had a museli bar or small pack of chips instead of the cheese, but that was about all anyone took. None of us were fat and none of us remember being hungry despite most of us playing a sport, surfing or skating before / after school and running around all lunch hour.

I don't have any little dudes; what are kids eating at school these days? A lot more than that?
NICE need to stop being so "nice" - because this attitude is actually very harmful.Agreed. I think the push for social acceptance has contributed a lot to the problem. I don't mean that we should pick on people who are a little tubby, but people who are obese shouldn't be thinking that it's good for them because it isn't. All the PC huggy stuff doesn't change the health risks.

probes
9th May 2012, 03:32
I think the push for social acceptance has contributed a lot to the problem
Absolutely.
Especially as in a way it's worse than booze - takes longer to get 'normal' than recovering from a hangover. :E

Yesterday I watched a bunch of guys (around 9) playing on a hillslope - run up, line up, run down and halfway go on rolling on the slope (would make one dizzy just watching it). Happy as can be. Where does the joy and energy disappear later, I wonder?

reynoldsno1
9th May 2012, 03:37
Obesity a 'derogatory' word, says Nice - mrsr1 gets nagged by her doctor as being far too skinny (5ft 4in 6.5 stone) - can we sue for exemplary damages due to defamation ....?

Slasher
9th May 2012, 05:10
Here's a good motivational video if you feel like breakin' yer diet...


L8Ilpm5n4iU

Warning - do not watch at brekky time. :yuk:

Worrals in the wilds
9th May 2012, 06:10
Not clicking. Not clicking. Not cli....damn, I clicked. :ouch:
You're a bastard, Slasher, but I guess you've been told that before :}.

The worst of it is that the first bloke actually isn't a bad dancer. If he did a class for two hours a week he'd probably knock a bit of weight off.

Solid Rust Twotter
9th May 2012, 06:21
"Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night, half an hour before I went to bed, eat a lump of cold poison, walk 20 miles to school with shoes tied round my neck to save shoeleather ......"

Not quite, but I walked 3 or 4 miles to and from school most days. Not because I didn't have bus money, but because it was the healthy option. That meant keeping the bus money and spending it in the tuck shop!

Similar thing with me except that it was 2 miles and I had to run the gauntlet of making it past the local Afrikaans school alone every day. Got into fisticuffs daily which instilled in me a level of alertness and situational awareness few of my peers possess. Depending on numbers, my tactics would vary but not always successfully. Some days you eat the bear, other days the bear eats you.


Small boys are little shits.

Slasher
9th May 2012, 06:33
You're a bastard, Slasher, but I guess you've been told that before

Untold countless times Worrals, untold countless times babe! ;)


Oh and BTW...

I don't have any little dudes;

Lemme know if you change your mind! :E

Worrals in the wilds
9th May 2012, 07:11
People keep telling me I'll get clucky, but it ain't happened yet. I had a minor desire to get a miniature daschund for about a week, but that's as close as it's ever got. I must be missing the 'maternal' gene.

They are cute though, huh. :)
http://static.gotpetsonline.com/pictures-gallery/dog-pictures-breeders-puppies-rescue/miniature-dachshund-pictures-breeders-puppies-rescue/pictures/miniature-dachshund-0073.jpg
Gratuitous puppy piccy alert...;)

Slasher
9th May 2012, 07:52
I had a minor desire to get a miniature daschund for about a week,

Hey I can lend you a dasch for a week hon, but after that the missus
and the little bloke will want him back.


I must be missing the 'maternal' gene.

Now why couldn't I have met you years ago? :(

Worrals in the wilds
9th May 2012, 09:52
Hey I can lend you a dasch for a week hon, but after that the missus and the little bloke will want him back.Cool! That said, I've got fabulous connections with AQIS (or whatever they're called this week :hmm:) but I don't think even their dog unit could help me get a dog in from Thailand. Nor would I ask them. :eek: Some cross cultural stuff just doesn't work.

MagnusP
9th May 2012, 10:31
how the heck the father found a way to get it in there!

Easy. Roll 'em in flour and look for the damp bit. :E

MagnusP
9th May 2012, 10:32
Uh Oh! The timestamp fairy is back in town. I posted after TTN.

Worrals in the wilds
9th May 2012, 10:45
Uh Oh! The timestamp fairy is back in town. I posted after TTN.I thought it was confusing...Control F solved it. Obviously a multinational joke; IIRC it was used in Barrett's You Wouldn't Be Dead For Quids.

Still bloody funny, though rather unPC. :E
how they were going to find a way to get the baby out,Some of 'em must need a GPS. :uhoh:

Edit: timestamp fairy is still wreaking havoc. It's not 1945 EST here...:confused:

Tankertrashnav
9th May 2012, 10:50
Slasher - your vid reminded me of when Mrs TTN was a midwife. She said that when they had women like that in for delivery, they didnt know which was more puzzling - how they were going to find a way to get the baby out, or how the heck the father found a way to get it in there!

Guess your bloke at 0.57 has solved one half of the puzzle, but we need to know - did he survive?

Tankertrashnav
9th May 2012, 11:05
Easy. Roll 'em in flour and look for the damp bit. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/evil.gif


Magnus - that is really awful :eek:









But very funny :ok:

rgbrock1
9th May 2012, 14:16
To all those who seem defensive about being overweight.

There is a big, big difference (literally) between being a few pounds overweight and being obese. Obesity will kill you. Being a few pounds overweight probably won't.

Slasher
9th May 2012, 15:08
but we need to know - did he survive?

I believe he suffocated to death and his rib cage completely
crushed when she decided to move up and sit on his face.

Capot
9th May 2012, 15:12
Post 46 (Sorry, just catching up);

Then again, the same bus that picks up these kids - if you unfortunate enough to get stuck behind it - stops ever 1/4 mile or so to pick up another bunch of high school-aged kids.

Disgusting.

That hits the nail on the head. It's the hash brownies that put them in that state.

Disgusting is the mot juste.

Tinstaafl
9th May 2012, 15:52
I grew up in Oz, lived in the UK, and now the US for the last 8 years. Although obesity is noticeable in all three countries I'm still astounded at rate of it here in the US.

I'm in my mid-forties and was concerned when I reached 180lb! As a result I started inline speed skating a few years ago (I've even won a few medals in our local region race meets) to eventually reduce to 160lb or less. For the last year or so I increased to 3-4 x 2hr training sessions per week plus additional outdoor distance skating and my weight has reduced to a bit over 170lb. I think it would be more but there seems to have been an increased muscle mass in my legs from the skating demands. I'm happy to eat BBQ ribs & pizza, drink beer and the like but not all the time. We limit our 5yo son's McD to once per fortnight and no lollies or desert unless he finishes his meal. That seems to limit his junk intake quite well. Moderation of input (without going overboard) balanced by some amount of exertion is the key, I think.

Now I have Liam involved with speed skating for both fun and as a prophylactic against the US lifestyle. He said he'd like to compete next racing season. Liam attends a Montessori school. I've noticed that there's only one child who's overweight there. Perhaps those who care enough about one aspect of their kid's development are also disposed to look after other areas?

Worrals in the wilds
9th May 2012, 21:07
There is a big, big difference (literally) between being a few pounds overweight and being obese. Obesity will kill you. Being a few pounds overweight probably won't.

For sure, particularly if you're reasonably physically active. It may not contribute much to weight loss, but it keeps your cardiovascular system and metabolism working.

TZ350
9th May 2012, 21:43
[quote] Tankertrashnav

" Certainly agree that being overweight is a bad thing - I've always carried too much weight and blame no-one but myself - not so much an under-active thyoid as an over active fork. "

:D:D I'm going to make small posters of that and put them all around my kitchen.....
maybe they will trigger the " will power ". :O

Nothing else I've tried seems to work......:{

pudoc
9th May 2012, 22:33
NHS have told doctors not to tell patients they are obese as it may offend them.

Wrong direction? I think so.

passy777
10th May 2012, 10:15
Last Easter they went to Orlando and could not believe how large the other
kids were, the thing that surprised them more than anything was how much the other kids could eat. My grand kids ate more in that fortnight than they
normally would,and enjoyed it, but in every diner or restaurant they would be pointing out to each other how much more the other kids were eating and
wondering how they managed it...

I can remember when Sizzler restaurants (In US) used to have a kind of kids buffet trolley which was basically full of crap - and I mean CRAP!

In never ceased to amaze me that kids would pile up their plates - not because they were hungry - but very likely just because this stuff was there.

Yes - I know - kids would do that wouldn't they? - but what got me was that their grossly overweight parents were too busy stuffing their own faces to notice and would just let them get on with it.

On my last visit to a Sizzler - the cart had been removed - although I suspect due to financial reasons as opposed to health!

reynoldsno1
11th May 2012, 00:28
r1jr was about 4 when we took her to a 'buffet' 'serve yourself' place for the 1st time. She could hardly believe it when we told her she could go and choose anything she liked...

She came back with a plate that appeared to have all the garnish on it - parsley, orange & pineapple slices, more parsley plus several slices of salami and about a kilo of olives. She ate it all, but declared the salami as 'not spicy enough' (her Mum is from Thailand).

She was 7 when we moved to the US for a while - on being introduced to the the national dish - instant macaroni cheese - she uttered her 1st profanity...

She's much bigger now, but still loves olives, and is built like a racing snake, just like her Mum ...

G-CPTN
11th May 2012, 00:53
First time we travelled on the DFDS North Sea Ferry between Denmark and England (something that we did regularly over three years), daughter was aged 7.

We explained to her that she could visit the buffet, collect a plate, and select anything that was there - whatever she wanted, and that she could go back again for more if she wanted to.

Off she went, and, having perused the usual Scandinavian Smörgåsbord offerings, she spied the quartered tomatoes, so she picked a few.
She was completely on her own (though we were in sight of her).
Continuing around the display, piled high with gravad lax, rejer (prawns), pickled herring, warm fillets of plaice in breadcrumbs, and all the usual delicacies of Danish cold table and warm dishes, she again spotted the quartered tomatoes, (which she liked), so picked up a few before continuing around the table.

When she returned to our table, her plate was full - of tomatoes - nothing else other than tomatoes.
Faced with the possibility of being able to choose exactly what she wanted, she decided that her favourite was tomatoes and as she was free to choose exactly what she wanted, she did just that . . .

Tableview
11th May 2012, 07:05
reynoldsno1
She's .............built like a racing snake,
I have only ever heard that expression used by Rhodesians - is that where you're from? Perhaps it's a common expression but I've not heard it out of that context.

I remember a restaurant my parents used to take us too when I were a lad, where they had a Scandinavian type buffet piled with prawns, smoked salmon, crayfish, cold meat. We used to see people piling their plates high with the stuff so it was falling off the edges, as if it were the last bit of food on the planet, disgusting to see such greed.

Travel trade meals were very much like that too now I think about it.

sitigeltfel
11th May 2012, 08:14
There is a cure....

spCMhlJxB5c

ExSp33db1rd
11th May 2012, 10:17
We used to see people piling their plates high with the stuff so it was falling off the edges,

I hate d-i-y buffets, despite ones' better judgement, a bit of this and a bit of that always seems to add up to more food than I really want, but some Singapore establishments started charging for the food LEFT on the plate, that had a great effect, stopped waste and overeating.

Can't quite remember how they Policed it, but of course, being Singaporean they did.

Worrals in the wilds
11th May 2012, 11:34
You have to admire the Singers mob, though I wouldn't want to live there. They have a way of dealing with social issues that's ruthlessly efficient.

When she was little and we went to buffets, my dear sister used to combine dessert and main on the same plate. She didn't see the point in going back. We still tease her about the plate of oysters and fruit tart. :ooh:

I always enter a buffet with the best of intentions ('what a great way to sample different dishes') and end up eating enough to feed a footy training camp for a week. :( Fortunately they're not a regular occurrence.

Slasher
11th May 2012, 11:41
Its them "all you can eat" places for a set price that buggers
you up.

Yonks ago in Vegas, Caesars P offered a chow-down for only
$2. Gorged down so much top quality grub I don't think my
abs ever recovered. Didn't eat for a week either.

KAG
11th May 2012, 12:43
rgbrok1: This would cost an additional $550 billion in medical expenditures.

Economy is very simple: as long as the food industry will make more money (jobs, taxes, contribution to the GDP growth...) than what could cost the loss in medical expenditure, there is no economic reason to change anything. And as you know, economy is everything nowadays, politic is only trying to catch up with finance and economy without really mastering it...
Sad but true.

Economy has no moral, no ethic, no human value, it only answers to basic values and rules which are more or less the ones you can find in the jungle for wilde animals.
That's why politic is important and should be on top of economy, however liberalism and deregulation have helped economy to be on its own.
We wanted economic freedom? We got anarchy and violence.

green granite
12th May 2012, 12:59
From today's Torygraph:

Forget BMI, just measure your waist and height' say scientists

"Ideally, all should aim to keep their waist measurement less than half that of their height, found the scientists.

That means a 6ft (72 inch) tall man should aim to keep his waist less than 36 inches, while a 5ft 4in (64 inch) woman should keep hers under 32 inches.

They have found that the easy-to-calculate ratio between the two is a better predictor of risk than the most widely measure of obesity, called body mass index (BMI)."

Rest of article: 'Forget BMI, just measure your waist and height' say scientists - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9260091/Forget-BMI-just-measure-your-waist-and-height-say-scientists.html#disqus_thread)

KAG
12th May 2012, 14:04
I don't need no scientist formula to see that somebody is abusing the joy of junk food. It is quite obvious to me, but I understand doctors need some numbers to support the advice they give their patient: eat less! Whatever the formula...


The (junk) food industry is a business, nothin more than that: the only goal is to make money.
Saddly it mainly touches the uneducated and poor ones: they are victim twice:

1-a first time physically. I know the politically correct makes everybody blind but don't tell me a little girl is dreaming herself fat when adult. Despite all the rationalization we hear (being fat is OK, being fat is a sickness, I feel good in my body like that blahblahblah...). Fact is that a fat young woman will dramatically decrease her chance to find a partner that will match what she wants, and a fat guy will always live shorter, be more sick thanthe same man fit practicing sport and mastering what he eats.

2-a second time financially: it touches mainly poor people and those persons instead of saving to send their kids to university, they make loans and take different credit cards to eat always more, like nobody taught them any other way to entertain their life. Making bank loan to buy food? It looks like the darker time of our history when many people had to borrow to eat, like during war time in Europe (not during war time in the US because it was an economic boom there for different reasons)...



It is not wrong to say that inside the fat of obese people, that's $$$, those kind of people are carrying (and supporting) the economy inside their body, litteraly, you can actually see it.
This is the very sign that our model is sick and doesn't really work if people have to kill themselves and look like monsters to support the growth.

probes
12th May 2012, 17:59
it touches mainly poor people

if I remember correctly, the Very Fat Guy said he spent £30 a day on food. I'm not in the UK - how would that compare to other people's expenses on food?

stuckgear
12th May 2012, 18:27
i kind of know what your driving at KAG, but not sure if agree. it's more to do with abdication of responsibility, political correctness and, well laziness.

some people just can't be bothered to consider their health and expect, or even demand that the healthcare system cure them of their obesity and the associated healtcare problems; diabetes, coronary problems etc.

it's always someone elses' fault, but you are right want a smaller waist, eat less. be responsible for your health and with your health and dont expect that a wanton disregard for health will be resolved with a quick fix.

everything comes at a price, obesity is not a quick fix gastric band or nip and tuck there are a whole host of problems that come with it and there is, of course a healthcare cost to bear too.

(6'3" and 32/34 inch waist.)

green granite
12th May 2012, 18:30
if I remember correctly, the Very Fat Guy said he spent £30 a day on food. I'm not in the UK - how would that compare to other people's expenses on food?

My wife's budget is around £50-60 per week for the two of us, and we eat very well, but not excessively, but then veg from the local farm is dirt cheap, she makes her own bread and we tend to buy 1/2 a lamb and pig from the local farmer.

Tableview
12th May 2012, 18:44
It is true that obesity has become a disease of the poor and the uneducated. Unhealthy food is often cheaper and easier and thus within the reach of those who do not have the resources to purchase good ingredients and make healthy food at home. Also, I know this will sound frightfully snobby, but so be it, you only have to look into or walk past a MuckDonalds to see and hear the type of people who use these places, generally they are not exactly the cream of society.

A chav parent will always find it easier to shut up a screaming child by going into a child-friendly MuckD and buying that 'attractively' packaged produce than a salad in an ordinary snack bar. The same really applies if you look at the choice between a chocolate bar or packet of chips on one hand and a carrot or an apple on the other. Sadly a lot of this is down to the power of marketing and the companies have picked up on how to appeal to the weak and vulnerable.

probes
12th May 2012, 19:24
Unhealthy food is often cheaper and easier
but one doesn't need to eat truckloads of it?

how to appeal to the weak and vulnerable
well... I'd disagree here. It's about motivation - for example my daughter was allergic to sugary things when a kid, meaning a lollipop just was not an option to keep her busy and quiet. She couldn't even have bisquits or any sugar in her tea - so I didn't have any either, as not to enjoy secret pleasures :E. (she's slim as... what was the expression? a racing snake? now :E). It's manageable, one just has to be determined.

Tableview
12th May 2012, 19:39
how to appeal to the weak and vulnerable well... I'd disagree here. It's about motivation -

Probes ..... the weak and vulnerable lack motivation, which is why they are weak and vulnerable, so I fear your argument is self-negating!

I was able to have a reasoned discussion about McD with my son when he was about 5. He's been to one, didn't like it, and has no interest in going near that or similar again. He's 17 and as thin as ....... a racing snake!

ExSp33db1rd
13th May 2012, 00:26
(6'3" and 32/34 inch waist.)

Boasting again ? (me - 5'11 1/2" and 38" - but see post #71 )

Slightly off thread, but Mrs. ExS' father was overweight, wheelchair bound, so no exercise whatsoever, ate a hearty T-bone steak with mashed potato and lashings of gravy followed by cheesecake or apple pie and ice cream EVERY day at the local Dennys fastfood around the corner, to where he insisted on being driven ( we didn't even get the exercise of pushing him ).

He lived to 99.

On our last visit, just after his 99th, his Dr. made a routine visit and took his blood pressure - wait for it .... 135/50. !!! I hated him for that !!

I guess there was no stress in his Life, everybody did / had to / do everything - and I mean everything - for him. RIP.

Seldomfitforpurpose
13th May 2012, 01:27
It is true that obesity has become a disease of the poor and the uneducated.

MASSIVE MASSIVE MASSIVE generalisation, the country is as full of fat well to do folk and thin poor folk as it is full of fat poor folk and thin rich folk :=

KAG
13th May 2012, 01:48
Seldomfit, many studies available, it mainly touches the uneducated families. It comes with education: some are not taught to entertain their life with something else than food.

However in the US this is true, it basically touches all the society now (but the uneducated even more), and findind somebody fit is rather hard nowadays, it even gave the US army some troubles to hire some years back.
For obvious reasons I won't explain educated and wealthy young women pay more attention to their weight than their male counterpart.

Slasher
13th May 2012, 05:00
Macdonald's? Mate how do you stomach that swill? :yuk:

Fatslobbery caused by overindulgence isn't a poor thing or a
ejamakashun thing - its a cultural pigout thing. Sure, being
taught to distinguish fattening food from the non-fats (plus
transfats etc) is an advantage - but ultimately your Al Gore
and Kim Jong-Un types are just greedy bloody pigs. Others
like your Oprahs and Kirstie Alleys don't have the discipline.

ExSp33db1rd
13th May 2012, 06:30
..........and a Filet-o-Fish .........

I agree, without the cheese - it's the cholesterol y' know - keeps me going occasionally, too.

And in NZ MacD give free coffee to Those Of A Certain Age, proper coffee poured out of a caraffe and made through a filter in one of those Bunn-o-Matic percolator gadgets, none of your yuppie Espresso or Latte stuff.

probes
13th May 2012, 07:28
the weak and vulnerable lack motivation, which is why they are weak and vulnerable
dunno. One would think the heaps of extra pounds to carry along every second of your life could be motivating enough - not to have them? Also one has to be in really good health to eat that much? (I love French fries, btw, just my pancreas doesn't, so mostly I can't...).
And I really think it's absolutely wrong to treat obesity as something unavoidably tragic. The doctors promptly tell you to stop smoking or some type of food with some diseases - so instead of trying to make the situation more 'dignified', they should tell to stop eating so much. (If it's not a real disorder, that is). Maybe some costumes with extra weight would help, if the slightly overweight person put it on to know what it will feel like if they don't motivate themselves.

stuckgear
13th May 2012, 07:52
have to agree with you probes. citing obesity as a disease is again an abdication of responsibility.. 'it's not my fault, i have a disease..'



none of your yuppie Espresso or Latte stuff.


some stabrucks coffees have more fat that a maccyd's burger

hellsbrink
13th May 2012, 08:03
some stabrucks coffees have more fat that a maccyd's burger

And they taste sooooo good. But at these prices (last time I went I spent over €10 on two coffees, one for me and one for her) it is just an occasional treat....

ExSp33db1rd
13th May 2012, 09:00
some stabrucks coffees have more fat that a maccyd's burger

Even black ? What about MacD's ?

How does fat get into coffee beans that then only have water poured through them ? If the beans contain fat naturally, then that's a general coffee problem ( which might well be so, dunno ) not a MacD's problem.

Be interested in knowing, not a major coffee fan m'self anyway, wouldn't lose too much sleep if it became a prohibited drug, definitely don't need a morning "fix", but enjoy the taste occasionally. Tea, sans milk and sugar, my preference.

Mind you, if you go for Lattes, or Cappucinos, or Smooth Whites, or whatever some of the concoctions are called, that's a whole different ball game, but then that's not drinking coffee either.

No accounting for taste if that's your fancy.

hellsbrink
13th May 2012, 09:32
I disagree about "latte" and "cappuccino" being "not coffee".

Right now I am drinking what you would call a "latte". Yes, it's coffee with milk in it. Unusual for me, but the pads we have for the Senseo just now (Douwe Egberts ones and not some cheap floor scrapings from Aldi) can cause a a rather large rise in my stomach acid so the milk helps with that. At work, it's "Oprah" all the way as the stuff I use in my coffee set gives me the caffeine I need without the acidity.

I love a good cappucino too, but there has to be enough coffee in it (normally 6 shots in a big cup from starbucks).

The coffee is still the important thing, to me anyway.

stuckgear
13th May 2012, 09:33
here you go ex-sp.. 10 of The Worst and Most Fat-Filled Starbucks Beverages | Call Me Thirsty (http://www.callmethirsty.com/2010/02/22/10-of-the-worst-and-most-fat-filled-starbucks-beverages/)


personally i like greek coffee, coffee you can chew... or espresso..

hellsbrink
13th May 2012, 09:41
Sounds like the way I like my tea. So strong the spoon stands up before being dissolved............

Tableview
13th May 2012, 09:49
Rich-Poor Gap Narrowing in Obesity (http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20050502/rich-poor-gap-narrowing-in-obesity)

Effects of Poverty of Health | obesity, stress, disease | My Family Plate (http://myfamilyplate.com/806/poverty-and-health/)

Originally Posted by Tableview http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/484772-united-states-obesity-post7186326.html#post7186326)
It is true that obesity has become a disease of the poor and the uneducated.
MASSIVE MASSIVE MASSIVE generalisation, the country is as full of fat well to do folk and thin poor folk as it is full of fat poor folk and thin rich folk

It may not be as much of a generalisation as you think, and most of what I have read indicates that it is true. The couple of articles above are by no means conclusive but they tend to point to lower income people being more likely to suffer from obesity and consequent health problems.

Tankertrashnav
13th May 2012, 09:55
Slightly off thread, but Mrs. ExS' father was overweight, wheelchair bound, so no exercise whatsoever, ate a hearty T-bone steak with mashed potato and lashings of gravy followed by cheesecake or apple pie and ice cream EVERY day at the local Dennys fastfood around the corner, to where he insisted on being driven ( we didn't even get the exercise of pushing him ).

He lived to 99.



Sorry to hear of the tragic early death of your father in law, ExS. Just think, if he'd adopted a healthy eating regime and had taken more exercise he'd still be with us at 110 (or whatever) ;)

Btw, latte/cappucino etc :yuk:

One small coffee cup (the old-fashioned little ones) of strong filter coffee after dinner is my daily intake. Coffee which appears to be drunk luke warm out of a cereal bowl with a handle cannot be regarded as coffee. And wtf is a 'barista'? The term belongs in the same category as 'rodent extermination operative' as far as I'm concerned.

hellsbrink
13th May 2012, 10:00
It may not be as much of a generalisation as you think, and most of what I have read indicates that it is true. The couple of articles above are by no means conclusive but they tend to point to lower income people being more likely to suffer from obesity and consequent health problems.

And the thing is, many could improve their health by simply getting off their backsides and cooking proper food themselves for less than the cost of all the junk they eat. But that would interrupt their valuable time in the pub or mean they miss their favourite daytime chat show it isn't an option.

chksix
13th May 2012, 10:26
Some have a healthy lifestyle. They should be ambassadors of health :E
ImageBam (http://www.imagebam.com/image/741f49184343929)
ImageBam (http://www.imagebam.com/image/70b6f2184343959)

probes
13th May 2012, 13:02
Ok, and probably that's not PC, but - how can it be that one does not work because one eats (has eaten) too much? There used to be a proverb (and still is in some languages) - if you do not work, you will not eat.
Again, does not apply to those with real disorders or disabilities.

603DX
13th May 2012, 15:39
chksix, that blue dress provides a classic example of an orthogonally anisotropic tensile stress field. One begins to notice such phenomena after spending a long career as an engineer, when the passing of the years has diminished the "surge of the urge" enough to override the previously overwhelming interest in the nubile generator of the stress field ... :sad:

stuckgear
13th May 2012, 16:57
Obese Britain: NHS paid for 20 children as young as 15 to have gastric band or stomach stapling surgery in past two years | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2143694/Obese-Britain-NHS-paid-20-children-young-15-gastric-band-stomach-stapling-surgery-past-years.html)

redsnail
13th May 2012, 17:29
Love the blue dress, just wish I could wear it without embarrassing myself. :ok:

fireflybob
13th May 2012, 18:45
Being watching this thread with interest.

It takes a certain amount of self discipline to keep weight under control, which is probably what those who are obese lack!

Even if you are not grossly overweight keeping a food diary can be very revealing - in fact there is quite a bit of documented evidence that this small act will reduce the amount you consume as it makes you more aware of what you are consuming.

I think the other issue you is that many obese people have been so far from "normal" for so long that they have forgotten what it is like.

Also lifestyles have changed enormously over the last 50 years or so. We now have wall to wall 24 hour tv (not to mention the internet also), "fast" food delivered to the door, with many more families owning cars and the perceived threat of crime causing parents to run the little darlings all over the place.

Jim Rohn (probably the original self development coach) said that your income level becomes the average of the 5 most significant (peer group) people that you mix with on a regular basis. I think this can be applied to many things including weight. Also if only a small percentage of people were obese then they would be the "odd ones out" but now the majority are obese it's the skinny ones that stand out.

I was in a pub in my home town (drinking water!) and was pretty appalled to see the antics of a hen party - they were all grossly overweight, drinking copious amounts and also chain smoking just outside the entrance - I really thought what hope is there when people get into this state?

Coming to coffee etc perhaps we should also remind people that milk is a food rather than a drink. Personally I cut out milk in coffee and tea (I know only drink herbal, mainly green) years ago, not to mention sugar and sweeteners. It is quite possible to educate one's palette to different tastes but you have to stick at it.

The question we really have to ask is how we can teach the obese to apply self discipline in their lives.

stuckgear
13th May 2012, 19:36
The question we really have to ask is how we can teach the obese to apply self discipline in their lives.


we can't. laziness and the quick fix rules! look at the link for 15 year olds getting gastric bands and stomach stapling...

a 15 year old hasn't even finished growing and is being granted lazy surgery that while it maybe a 'quick fix' will have lasting, far reaching, repercussions for the rest of the patient's natural life, but could be prevented by diet and exercise.

ricardian
13th May 2012, 19:45
Sounds like the way I like my tea. So strong the spoon stands up before being dissolved............
My grandfather was a railway signalman. He made his tea in a metal teapot which he then put on the stove to boil for 10 minutes. It was then considered strong enough to drink

Fareastdriver
13th May 2012, 20:19
ImageBam


She didn't tell me she was doing that. I shall have to have a word with her.

Loose rivets
13th May 2012, 20:34
Haven't read all through, no need, one is allergic to so much stuff it helps me keep the weight off. A sylphlike and consistent 200lbs.


However, the insanity goes on. Hours of programs here about people who simply can not stop stuffing cakes into their mouths. It disgusts me, but not as much as the new breed of 'celebrates' that are now being paid VAST sums of money for EVERY POUND THE FAT @$^#%^&# LOSE.

foresight
13th May 2012, 21:16
I am very happy that I remain slim in spite of the fact that I eat like the proverbial horse. However I was lucky to have been brought up by parents who were knowledgeable about food, my mother being a very, very good cook. My palate was educated to enjoy savoury tastes, fruit and veg etc etc. I learnt to enjoy, and to make time for cooking both for my own pleasure and as a social skill. I grow much of my own vegetables and herbs. I have been able to pass that knowledge to my own children.

I count myself lucky because I am aware that the food and drinks industries have addicted whole populations to sugar (in various forms) , refined flour, saturated fats and alcohol. Life would be a bit sad without those things but a good, varied diet does not include them in exclusion to just about everything else - which seems to be the case for so many.

So we have two or three generations who just don't 'know' about food and are actually scared of cooking. They may watch endless TV programmes about expensive, unattainable and frankly pretentious dishes but that only serves to scare them off trying to cook something simple and nutritious. Meanwhile, if they do eat salad, they cover it in sugary gloop out a bottle and bread in the US is as sweet as cake in the UK. Yes, I know you can get excellent bread in the US but bad as UK supermarket bread is, it does not have the same sugar content.

Come to that, why, here in the UK, do I have to pay more (a lot more) for peanut butter without sugar than with? (Love it with Marmite!).

I don't see any improvement in the obesity situation until the food and drinks industries are persuaded stop trying to poison us (especially those on low incomes) and people learn to love and to cook real food. The willpower to lose massive amounts of weight is simply beyond most people - it probably would be beyond me, were I in that unfortunate situation.

As for coffee, I would like to say to whoever first thought of putting dairy products and sugar in such a wonderful drink - what a revolting idea (IMHO).

ExSp33db1rd
14th May 2012, 01:36
here you go ex-sp.. 10 of The Worst and Most Fat-Filled Starbucks Beverages | Call Me Thirsty

Exactly my point, none listed is Honest to God plain COFFEE - that I can get from MacD's, providing that I can stop them adding the sugar and milk, usually a challenge 'cos they don't listen. What part of "coffee, black, no sugar" don't they understand, they usually respond with " do you want sugar with that ?" then serve it with cream. Grrrr !! But it's free so I don't have the heart to make them pour it away, 'specially if I've not bought anything else !

jabird
14th May 2012, 02:29
Again, does not apply to those with real disorders or disabilities.

Up to a point - in many cases, the health condition makes it harder to maintain a healthy lifestyle, but it does not always make it impossible.

Disability is a blockage to some, or just a hurdle to others - and even being wheelchair bound does not always mean being unable to exercise - and that's why we have the Paralympics as well as the Olympics.

Remember that disability comes in many forms, and the "obvious" visible kinds barely accounts for half of all disabled people. Don't forget mental health - this again can be a serious burden towards planning and maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine - but it also works the other way. Just as your illness can encourage poor diet and no exercise, so can good diet and regular exercise reduce the symptoms of your condition.

Although I agree that some fresh "superfoods" can be much more expensive than a portion of frozen chips, even if the diet might take some effort, many forms of exercise are free, whereas others (eg swimming) are available at a massive subsidy to people on lower incomes or who have disabilities.

It isn't all the fault of big business or society - each individual has a very large part to play in their own health too!

reynoldsno1
14th May 2012, 05:36
"... built like a racing snake ..."

I have only ever heard that expression used by Rhodesians

I can't remember where I first heard it, TView - but I worked in the ME in the mid-80's, and a number of colleagues were Rhodesians ...

Solid Rust Twotter
14th May 2012, 06:52
Heard some Brit mil types use it too.

probes
14th May 2012, 07:34
603DX: that blue dress provides a classic example of an orthogonally anisotropic tensile stress field.
Oh, my! :D


(so, zero tolerance to editing. OK, I added the colon :).

KAG
14th May 2012, 08:47
Foresight: nice post.

Well done with your kids: education is everything on this matter, early habits are very importants concerning quality food.

Having a small garden at home, even when living in the city is possible (balcony?).

The biggest success from the food industry was to make us believe we actually do have to pay for everything, when vegetables are in fact less expensive to grow than flowers in your appartment.

probes
14th May 2012, 11:10
Having a small garden at home
unless you have a reliable farmer to provide the manure (still full of antibiotics' residue?), it wouldn't make any difference - fertilisers at home or from the shop.
And actually I don't know - the producers with the 'drop-system' - all the nutrients counted and included in the system, many hothouses do not have any soil even any more, and several of my doctorates from our University of Life Sciences claim it's healthy, bec. it's optimal - well, what IS normal and natural.

uffington sb
14th May 2012, 12:17
SRT.
And Akrotiri racing chicken!

KAG
14th May 2012, 12:38
Probes: fertilisers
I believe that in 2012 it is now well known we do have efficient alternatives to fertilisers.

rgbrock1
14th May 2012, 14:16
the weak and vulnerable lack motivation, which is why they are weak and vulnerable

They also lack self-esteem and inner confidence.

Solid Rust Twotter
14th May 2012, 15:17
Bull terriers known as Chinese Racing Pigs. OT but humorous...

probes
14th May 2012, 19:28
I believe that in 2012 it is now well known we do have efficient alternatives to fertilisers.

Such as? Honestly, I haven't read much on the topic. (and use the oldfashioned manure in the garden).

jabird
15th May 2012, 23:40
In a buffet restaurant earlier (my weekly sin).

Two very large ladies - we can't call them obese or morbidly obese, so let's say lipidly gifted, grazing away with a small kid.

He's bored of his Chinese ribs and chips and starts screaming "bacdonad, bacdonad......"

Needless to say he got his wish.

Sometimes I just give up! :ugh::mad:

Worrals in the wilds
16th May 2012, 00:03
Needless to say he got his wish.And IMHO those seven words summarise the whole problem. There are now three generations of people (the later Xs, Ys and whatever the current mob are) who got their wish, every single time they whined. :rolleyes:

Okay, that's a bit of a generalisation, but I'm amazed how many well meaning mothers I know practically give their kids a menu to choose from every night. My mother wasn't a standover merchant and she tried to cook stuff everyone liked, but she worked all day and what she felt like cooking for dinner was what you got.

These kids who just bellow and get what they want (and we've all seen them out and about) are being set up for a lifetime of weight problems, not to mention an unshakeable sense of entitlement. :sad: Just like their parents were.

probes
16th May 2012, 04:20
My mother wasn't a standover merchant and she tried to cook stuff everyone liked, but she worked all day and what she felt like cooking for dinner was what you got.

:cool: - and mostly one come from outdoors, having been 'busy' all day and too hungry to care what is was, the main thing was that it WAS food.

stuckgear
16th May 2012, 06:52
My mother wasn't a standover merchant and she tried to cook stuff everyone liked, but she worked all day and what she felt like cooking for dinner was what you got.



TV chefs have to bear some responsibility too. i rarely see TV presentations of cooking based on using readily available ingredients and simpl recipes apart from delia smith.

... for this simple dish you'll need fresh israeli corriander leaves, unsalted yak butter, norwegian shallots and canadian beef...

so many people, male and female alike when considering family meals get pushed away from actualy 'cooking' as often ingredients are somewhat 'esoteric' and the cooking level is more akin to pushing what-ever TV chef's latest resteraunt.

Worrals in the wilds
16th May 2012, 07:27
True.
I've noticed it's become a bit of a oneupmanship thing on facebook between a certain type of mother and her equally neurotic girlfriends. 'Jane Doe just served up homemade spanner crab stuffed filet mignon with shitake mushroom jus' :eek:. Of course the inference is clear; '...and that makes her a much better Mum than you, 'cause your kids just got steak and salad'. :ugh:
No wonder people get a bit intimidated.

rgbrock1
16th May 2012, 14:17
Worrals wrote:

And IMHO those seven words summarise the whole problem. There are now three generations of people (the later Xs, Ys and whatever the current mob are) who got their wish, every single time they whined

There are many reasons for this, Worrals. First, if your child whines and you dare to correct him or her then those nearby, in this PC world in which we live, may call da cops and have you arrested for child abuse. Nowadays, spanking a child on the butt could find you sitting on the electric chair. There is no more ghastly of a crime than smacking a poor child on the butt. To the gallows!

Also, many parents would rather give into their child's demands than have to hear him or her screeching "I want... I want.... I want", for hours on end. Doesn't say much for the parents but it is what it is.

Now the alternative, and the epitome of abuse, is what occurs when you decide you don't want to have to deal with the little ones so when embarking on an eating expedition, or shopping for that matter, you leave your kids locked in the car. Doesn't matter that it's 90F outside with the inside of the car is approaching 120F. At least you don't have to deal with it. The repercussions for this little stunt happens much later. (Usually on the parent's return to the car.)

It's all about personal responsibility. something sorely lacking in today's society. Sorely lacking indeed.

probes
16th May 2012, 18:18
if your child whines and you dare to correct him
read Karen Pryor's "Don't Shoot the Dog!"
Works wonders on humans, too.

charliegolf
16th May 2012, 18:33
There's a soon to be aired prog on tv about fatties who 'can't lose it no matter what they do'. They will be shadowed and filmed 24/7 ish. I am led to believe that my initial suspicion will be borne out, and they will all be found out to be fat greedy b'stards who lie about their intake. Metabolism, schmetabolism! It's greed.

Apologies if it has been shown, and people are aware of it.

CG

jabird
16th May 2012, 23:12
TV chefs have to bear some responsibility too. i rarely see TV presentations of cooking based on using readily available ingredients and simpl recipes apart from delia smith.

I thought that the ingredients for any of Anthony Worral-Thompson's dishes were more than readily (and freely) available from any branch of your local Tesco emporium, with porridge thrown in too?

Worrals in the wilds
16th May 2012, 23:22
Very true rgbrock1. The food companies are well aware of nag power and exploit the heck out of it.
The repercussions for this little stunt happens much later. (Usually on the parent's return to the car.)True. Dunno if it's still the SOP but the local police used to use the procedure;
1. open car door and get kids out.
2. lock and close car door.
3. then smash window. :E
4. Tear parent a new one for leaving kids in a car in a city that often has temperatures over thirty degrees Celcius.
Very un PC and probably not allowed these days either.
...and they will all be found out to be fat greedy b'stards who lie about their intake. Metabolism, schmetabolism! It's greed.The local Biggest Loser did something similar this year, when they put CCTV in the kitchen without telling the contestants. There was an awful lot of sneak-eating going on. :suspect: They also got the trainers to spend twenty four hours eating what the contestants ate, and it was frigging terrifying. IIRC one of the female trainers put on about three kilogrammes in a day.
(Not that I'd dream of watching such reality TV tripe :\).

flynverted
27th May 2012, 01:52
I'm American, been in Australia for nearly 8 years. Whenever asked by Australians what I miss most about America, I say "The Food"
Recently spent 4 weeks in America with my Australian SHMBO and she immediately understood why I constantly complained about Australian food. :yuk:
Sure, we went to the all you can eat breakfast/ lunch/dinner joints, and we enjoyed it, but we ate in moderation. And when we ordered a meal, sure, we got monsterous proportions but we ate until we were full, then we took the leftovers back to the hotel to be used for a late night snack or next days lunch.
I just looked at a family picture from we were in America and out of 15 people in my family, only 2 are obese

Worrals in the wilds
27th May 2012, 09:11
Out of interest, what sort of food do you miss?

stuckgear
27th May 2012, 09:44
Out of interest, what sort of food do you miss?


for me, it's decent mexican.

KAG
27th May 2012, 11:24
I think that one of the problems is that we are not taught to deal with our needs anymore.
Having an empty stomach and being hungry for hours is not something known anymore.

When we eat we feel that we have to continue eating until we feel full, like if we only could eat once a week.

There are times in the day when I feel hungry, and it doesn't bother me that much. I will wait for lunch/dinner time and won't eat junk food.
I feel it is all about education.

When I was a kid, I could be sent to bed without dinner if I was not nice at the table (not polite, or if I wanted to eat the dessert before the salad for example). Nowadays it might be seen as bad treatment, something maybe unacceptable.
Education disappeared, we all have to supply the kids need as soon as possible nowadays, that's what we call education.
Having an obese kid is not seen as a problem by many famillies, me I see that like bad treatment and parents failure.

We all have lost common sense, and we all have lost the capacity of effort, self motivation, self decision, lost our capacity to master our needs, we became our needs' slave for the greatest interest of the food industry.

hellsbrink
27th May 2012, 11:42
KAG

My God, we actually agree on something. Another thing is people often mistake the early signs of thirst as hunger so eat something instead of drinking. If they have some water (vile stuff) or tea/coffee instead then they'll find they lose the "hunger".

Oh, but, as said before, you cannot always call cases of childhood obesity the fault of the parents, although the vast majority of cases are. Sometimes there is something that makes it happen naturally, a throwback in the genes or something like that, which means the child is fat no matter what you do or how much running around like loons they do. I'm proof of that. It ain't just cases of what I call "abuse" that are the cause, but they are the majority.

stuckgear
27th May 2012, 11:43
Having an empty stomach and being hungry for hours is not something known anymore.


it is in Greece.

hellsbrink
27th May 2012, 11:48
it is in Greece.

In some parts of Britain it's more like going for hours without a McDonalds

Krystal n chips
27th May 2012, 12:08
" In some parts of Britain".....it's a fact of life Hells....and not one that you see advertised in the glossy tourist promotions for some inexplicable reason..

The Trussell Trust | Foodbank Projects (http://www.trusselltrust.org/foodbank-projects)

Anyway, today's UK contributor....albeit well established on track...is the paper delivery boy....same every Sunday in fact....car pulls up...disgorges a decidely rotund physique shape....shape delivers to about three houses...returns to car.....one can only wonder as to how much trauma the poor soul has to endure in the physical delivery of the newspapers...

probes
27th May 2012, 12:24
can you imagine? I also fully agree to:
We all have lost common sense
well, maybe not totally all, but close.

I also agree that feeling hungry sometimes is actually feeling thirsty (for water. Personal experience).
As for Greece... a couple of days back there was a video of a mum (well-dressed and well-fed) who just 'couldn't care for her child' and gave her to the care facility.
That's acutely nasty, I'd say.

flynverted
27th May 2012, 12:41
Out of interest, what sort of food do you miss?
A good hamburger and hotdog, American sausage, good cheese, decent pizza, fried eggs with fried potatoes with bisquits and gravy for breakfast, southern bbq... etc
Spent yonks complaining about Aussie food to SHMBO, once we got stateside, she realized what I was on about

hellsbrink
27th May 2012, 12:42
Anyway, today's UK contributor....albeit well established on track...is the paper delivery boy....same every Sunday in fact....car pulls up...disgorges a decidely rotund physique shape....shape delivers to about three houses...returns to car.....one can only wonder as to how much trauma the poor soul has to endure in the physical delivery of the newspapers...

I know, in my day we had to turn up at 0530 to get the papers and WALK the round (uphill!!) until we earned enough to buy a bike.



<waiting for inevitable Monty Python reference to getting out of bed 3 hours before going to sleep to walk 10 miles to pay to do a milk round before the paper round and when you got home you were flogged....... etc.>

tony draper
27th May 2012, 12:55
Delivering papers? we used to live under one.:rolleyes:
Well you did ask Mr H.

hellsbrink
27th May 2012, 13:03
No, I didn't "ask". I made a statement. :p

Krystal n chips
27th May 2012, 13:52
" A good hamburger and hotdog, American sausage, good cheese, decent pizza, fried eggs with fried potatoes with bisquits and gravy for breakfast, southern bbq"

Ah, the quintessential and possibly definitive guide to "healthy eating..American version" then?......;) :E

Fox3WheresMyBanana
27th May 2012, 14:14
The problem may be better explained by:

For Breakfast: A good hamburger and hotdog, American sausage, good cheese, decent pizza, fried eggs with fried potatoes with bisquits and gravy, southern bbq

For Elevenses: Large Coffee, 6 doughnuts...........etc

ricardian
27th May 2012, 15:45
Anyway, today's UK contributor....albeit well established on track...is the paper delivery boy....same every Sunday in fact....car pulls up...disgorges a decidely rotund physique shape....shape delivers to about three houses...returns to car.....one can only wonder as to how much trauma the poor soul has to endure in the physical delivery of the newspapers...
My sister and brother-in-law delivered the papers using their car - it was a 12 hour round trip in Western Australia delivering 7 days worth of newspapers to outlying sheep stations

ricardian
27th May 2012, 15:49
Here's a big burger (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2114821/Britains-biggest-burger-The-Beast-18-000-calories-7lbs-beef-9-rashers-bacon.html) - and it comes with a whole lettuce and three (yes, 3!) tomatoes

MadsDad
27th May 2012, 17:16
Sorry, I lived in the USA, I enjoyed the food there, but 'good cheese' is one thing the place is missing. Any country where the favourite (ok, if you insist, favorite) cheese is 'Monterrey Jack' says it all about their attitude to Rennett/Dairy produce.

M.Mouse
27th May 2012, 18:32
...from we were in America and out of 15 people in my family, only 2 are obese...

And you think that is a good record?

In my considerable experience food to be found in Australia can be top class.

ExSp33db1rd
27th May 2012, 22:34
Spent yonks complaining about Aussie food to SHMBO, once we got stateside, she realized what I was on about..........

Mrs. ExS - American - complains about NZ food in comparison to USA food, too.

Can't say I totally agree - but then I was brought up on UK food ( boiled cabbage etc !)

tony draper
27th May 2012, 22:54
We conquered three quarters of the world on boiled cabbage.:=
:rolleyes:

hellsbrink
28th May 2012, 05:41
True, Mr. D, I reckon most of them people were gassed as well.

Worrals in the wilds
28th May 2012, 05:54
I once read that the daily ration for pyramid builders in Ancient Egypt was a loaf of bread, a jug of beer and a bag of onions.
With a big, sweaty crowd in such confined spaces it must have been gruesome. :yuk:

Metro man
28th May 2012, 06:27
Spent yonks complaining about Aussie food to SHMBO, once we got stateside, she realized what I was on about..........

Aussie food is generally of high quality. A very wide selection of fresh meat, fish, poultry, dairy, fruit and veg is available in the supermarkets. Mostly home grown and free from nearly all the plant and animal diseases found in the rest of the world.

If you want to eat out there is no problem finding a wide variety of cuisines due to the varied mix of immigrants. I've eaten better Thai food in Queensland than in Thailand. Indian, Turkish, Lebanese etc are readily found in the main centers. Even Darwin has good Asian food available due to its proximity to Indonesia.

Solid Rust Twotter
28th May 2012, 06:42
...Even Darwin has good Asian food available due to its proximity to Indonesia.


Got good pies there too.:E:ok:

Slasher
28th May 2012, 07:38
We conquered three quarters of the world on boiled cabbage.

But that breadfruit idea didn't exactly go according to plan
though Drapes.

w3vtKU9bi10

I wonder how gastronomic history would've changed if Fletch
had've been captain and it was Bligh who got the chop in the
Pacific not Cook.