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probes
5th May 2012, 07:00
Meet the Man Who Lives on Zero Dollars: Career + Money : Details (http://www.details.com/culture-trends/career-and-money/200907/meet-the-man-who-lives-on-zero-dollars?currentPage=1)

His dwelling, hidden high in a canyon lined with waterfalls, is an hour by foot from the desert town of Moab, Utah, where people who know him are of two minds: He's either a latter-day prophet or an irredeemable hobo. Suelo's blog, which he maintains free at the Moab Public Library, suggests that he's both. "When I lived with money, I was always lacking," he writes. "Money represents lack. Money represents things in the past (debt) and things in the future (credit), but money never represents what is present."
**

He wasn't always this way. Suelo graduated from the University of Colorado with a degree in anthropology, he thought about becoming a doctor, he held jobs, he had cash and a bank account. In 1987, after several years as an assistant lab technician in Colorado hospitals, he joined the Peace Corps and was posted to an Ecuadoran village high in the Andes. He was charged with monitoring the health of tribespeople in the area, teaching first aid and nutrition, and handing out medicine where needed; his proudest achievement was delivering three babies. The tribe had been getting richer for a decade, and during the two years he was there he watched as the villagers began to adopt the economics of modernity. They sold the food from their fields—quinoa, potatoes, corn, lentils—for cash, which they used to purchase things they didn't need, as Suelo describes it. They bought soda and white flour and refined sugar and noodles and big bags of MSG to flavor the starchy meals. They bought TVs. The more they spent, says Suelo, the more their health declined. He could measure the deterioration on his charts. "It looked," he says, "like money was impoverishing them."
**



"I wanted to be a sadhu," Suelo says. "But what good would it do for me to be a sadhu in India? A true test of faith would be to return to one of the most materialistic, money-worshipping nations on earth and be a sadhu there. To be a vagabond in America, a bum, and make an art of it—the idea enchanted me."

Slasher
5th May 2012, 07:20
The way Bernanke, the Feds and the US economy are doing
Probes he might have a lot of company in the future - and
not by choice.

anotherthing
5th May 2012, 08:09
Bit of a hypocrite in my book... he uses resources from the Moab library to write his Blog, resources that are paid for by the capitalist world he is not wanting to be part of...

How many other 'freebies' is he using?

The term 'sponger' or 'self-publicist' springs to mind. Give it a couple of years and he'll be back in the mainstream with a book deal about his experiences.

Cynic? Moi???

probes
5th May 2012, 10:07
yep, that's what he's 'accused' of - but the article says that's not a big deal of money spent on him.

Flaymy
5th May 2012, 11:15
probes

But none of those resources would have been available to him without a monetary economy. None of the resources that kept the tribes people healthy in the first place would have been available.

Life before specialisation and economic development was nasty, brutish and short. People worked every hour of the day just to feed themselves, and still often went hungry. Disease was endemic, and lifespans were short. Childhood ended before teenage, and youths then went to hunt or gather food, or worked on rudimentary shelter.

Life for everyone was far harsher than it is for the very poorest people in western society. The homeless and indigent might be the worst off in our world, but they live like the tribal leaders of those times.

G-CPTN
5th May 2012, 11:31
It doesn't seem to have affected some of the Aboriginals in Australia.

I realise that those that inhabit the periphery of 'civilisation' depend on hand-outs from the State, but, I believe there are some in the further outback that still follow their original (aboriginal) way of life?

probes
5th May 2012, 12:16
ut none of those resources would have been available to him without a monetary economy
well, that's true of course, and if you ask me - it's quite ... well, how shall I put it? ironic? of someone living 'without money' to be blogging about it (in a library).
But there's some point in it, too - like a friend of mine said: If you have more money, you just buy more expensive shirts and throw them away sooner.
Well, his view.

Flaymy
5th May 2012, 21:10
probes

If that is what you choose to do with the extra money. That is the point - it is freedom.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
5th May 2012, 22:40
Firstly, I bet he doesn't make his own candles, and he certainly didn't dig up the iron ore, refine it and make that skillet himself. He still relies on a technical society, even if he won't admit it.

Secondly, what he is saying is"I can't cope with money, so I reject it". Your problem mate. You have my pity, but I can cope with money.

Lastly, why live in a cave? I've taught myself carpentry and am building my own house. Boy has he picked the wrong solution.

As my Survival instructors said "Any fool can be uncomfortable."

Mechta
6th May 2012, 19:45
Does anyone remember the film, 'The Gods Must Be Crazy?'

The story jumped around a bit, but in one part, a pilot threw an empty Coke bottle out over a primitive but happy tribe in Africa. The tribe soon found numerous uses for the new 'tool', but being a one off, it soon started jealousy and fights which had previously been absent.

As far as Suelo is concerned, the question is whether he is trying to say everyone should live like him, or if he's just saying it is possible to live like him, along side a consumerist money driven society. If it the latter, then I'm all for him. He could teach a lot of people in this country a thing or two. There is no shortage of people who can turn money into rubbish. Notice how those living on benefits have plasma televisions and all the cable channels, yet are incapable of feeding their children a nutritious meal? Fifty years ago a council house had a garden big enough for the occupants to grow most of their own vegetables, and they did. Now a lot of the properties don't even have a garden of their own.

But none of those resources would have been available to him without a monetary economy. None of the resources that kept the tribes people healthy in the first place would have been available.

Life before specialisation and economic development was nasty, brutish and short. People worked every hour of the day just to feed themselves, and still often went hungry. Disease was endemic, and lifespans were short. Childhood ended before teenage, and youths then went to hunt or gather food, or worked on rudimentary shelter.

Life for everyone was far harsher than it is for the very poorest people in western society. The homeless and indigent might be the worst off in our world, but they live like the tribal leaders of those times. Its called natural selection. The tribes that thrived knew about herbal remedies and how to avoid danger. What we now have in many Western countries is 'reverse Darwinism'. The fast and numerous breeders are those who don't have to take responsibility for their actions and rely on handouts from those who do.

If Mr Suelo does it right, he can write and sell a book about his experiences. If he does it wrong, someone will eventually find his sun-bleached sleleton.