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racedo
27th Apr 2012, 23:16
Mate has had a couple of run ins with local constabulary in the grim up North and tempted to make a complaint about seeming targeting of him.

When a complaint is made who investigates ?

Seldomfitforpurpose
28th Apr 2012, 00:04
No smoke without fire, always held that notion to be pretty accurate :ok:

corsair
28th Apr 2012, 00:12
Local station first, his superiors is the first resort. Sometimes it's not the first time. Also is there an ombudsman locally of some sort?

Found myself tackling a cop head on at one stage. Luckily I wasn't alone. An official complaint was made and the ahole backed off. It happens.

G-CPTN
28th Apr 2012, 00:13
Sometimes the motivation is based on false information.

racedo
28th Apr 2012, 00:44
Interesting

He got rammed from behind when with his family in county force area where he lives, then assaulted when stepped from car by other driver who is a cop but from neighbouring force, with 4 witnesses including county cop on duty, he ended up in ambulance to hospital but assaulter showed warrant card to county cop and didn't even get arrested, charged or anything done, even when ringing mate and threatening his family and kids.

Now on way to work turning out of where he lives a cyclist comes off payment and clips his car, he stops, ask cyclist if needs ambulance and even when assured not and cyclist cycles off, he calls cops on 999 and reports it so least its on tape. Cyclist is a cop in same force as number 1 and now they wish to charge him with dangerous driving, driving without due care and attention, leaving scene of accident etc. Cyclist never indicated he was cop on way to work and initially refused to accept mates details when offered but now claiming severe trauma and needs to be off work for weeks.

Initially he believed were separate until investigating officer for incident 2 is cop who attacked him in incident 1.

I told him make complaint of both incidents to Senior officer and talk to his MP as least then its recorded.

Lantern10
28th Apr 2012, 03:01
I wish you good luck.

hellsbrink
28th Apr 2012, 05:37
I'm sure your mate can find a very good lawyer willing to take on the case.

By the sound of things he has witnesses to the assault, as well as medical records showing it, and he has the call reporting the accident with the suicyclist so they cannot exactly pin the rest of that one on him unless he rolls over and takes one for Britain.


So get lawyered up, and nail the bastards. And he'll probably get compo too

McGoonagall
28th Apr 2012, 06:35
Definitely get legal advice. I witnessed an assault in a pub on my brother-in-law which left him needing 29 stitches in a head wound. Turns out they were off duty plod having a bit of a party. I testified in Crown Court and the attacking plod got 27 months. Shortly after that I started to get pulled over in the car for 'routine checks', arrested for 'fitting the description of a wanted man', being tailed by a police car for miles without being pulled over. Once I was stopped on the way to work, my unions legal assistance covers me at that time so I contacted them and gave them diarised details of what happened over 6 weeks or so. After a couple of weeks I received a letter from the force HQ apologising for the harassment and citing mis-identification, chance and wrong details on DVLA records. Total and utter bollocks, but it all stopped there and then.

stuckgear
28th Apr 2012, 07:34
interesting turn of events.

it would seem that there is a problem with not just a single officer but the involvement of at least two.

Police complaints - legal help and useful information (http://www.urban75.org/legal/complaints.html)

www.ipcc.gov.uk/ (http://www.ipcc.gov.uk/) is good place to start as is perhaps your local MP and maybe worthwhile in contacting the chief super. to address the complaint ina businesslike manner. it may also be worth considering mentioning that you have drafted a media release should this matter not be attended to and a response recived from him personally in say 10 days. negative media attention rolling down on his head from his superiors should provide some motivation.

alternatively..

move.

radeng
28th Apr 2012, 10:31
Many years ago. mrs radeng, driving an old Vauxhall Viva was getting stopped twice a week for several weeks on her way to work. Different plod each time. A letter to the Chief Constable brought the Traffic Superintendent out to apologise.

I heard later that the plod had dropped in (as they do for a cup of tea) when on nights into our factory security, and when the subject of stopping old cars came up, our security man was told 'We used to do a lot of that, but they kept stopping the same car and the same woman every week, and she complained to the Chief Constable. We were told to stop harassing people!'

But definitely a case for lawyer and possibly a letter to the Chief Constable to start with.

west lakes
28th Apr 2012, 11:47
Of course if you go to the force website there are details of the proceeder, for example here is the one for Surrey Police

Independent Police Complaints Commission - About Us - Surrey Police (http://www.surrey.police.uk/about/ipcc.asp)

you tend to find that if you don't follow these procedures the higher up the tree you get they start asking if you have and referring back to them if you haven't

Ancient Observer
28th Apr 2012, 12:43
Boring, but necessary

Get everything seen by everyone in writing. Keep all the records on writing. All the time.

In the written docs, keep all the records with dates and timings. Even date and time when you write it down.

G-CPTN
28th Apr 2012, 13:53
I won't begin to give details, but I was harassed by traffic police (driving into my private driveway) and was arrested and charged with assault (case dismissed by CPS) then arrested, charged and convicted (on false testament). After the final case I was told (off the record) by the arresting PC that I had been set-up on the instructions of a senior officer.

I'm still uncertain what was the original cause.

racedo
28th Apr 2012, 13:55
I told him about the MP stuff but other stuff worth doing as well.

Really is a mate and not me.

Only interaction with plod is a mate is in the Met and also got out of the way on a car on a blue light coming other way last year and got rammed from behind by someone distracted by blue light.

In that case cop stopped, called superior officer which didn't realise they have to do, and he stated immediately what he saw and accepted responsibility. Only inteaction after that was a call to check was i ok and a nice letter thanking me for getting out of way for an officer responding to an emergency.

Cops like every other occupation attract morons who assume they have total power.

skydiver69
28th Apr 2012, 14:24
Its termed a Polac when a police car hits another vehicle, person or object or a Proximity Polac if third parties are involved, as in your case Racedo. Either way any RTC like this will always be investigated by a sergeant.

I've just had a thought about one of your earlier posts regarding the cyclist. In theory any accident involving an off duty constable going to or from work should also be treated as a Polac. Even if that wasn't the case I'm sure no one would have been charged with dangerous driving without a) an RTC booklet being filled in (after all someone is claiming to have been injured/traumatised) and b) a contemp note interview under caution taking place with the driver. Do you know if any of that was done?

gingernut
28th Apr 2012, 18:31
One of our MacMillan nurses made the mistake of complaining about an issue a few years ago, life made hell by cops colleagues until she dropped complaint. They'd be waiting for her as she went to work, pull her over, same on the way home.

They were a law unto themselves.

racedo
28th Apr 2012, 20:38
Sky

Based on what mate said No as he had to try and give his details a number of times before cyclist would accept, he didn't know he was a cop until he received communication after.

Never heard of POLAC before but it does get interesting if cop not following procedures because he definitely was on way to work as per mate, that was why cyclist claimed he didn't wish to remain at scene.

Reckon mate did right thing in reporting as he did it under a 999 call and they are always recorded.

I have warned him that from now on be very careful as someone may try and teach him a lesson.

Gertrude the Wombat
28th Apr 2012, 20:46
One of our MacMillan nurses made the mistake of complaining about an issue a few years ago, life made hell by cops colleagues until she dropped complaint.
Depending on where you live and what the local politics are, there may be some mileage in talking to your local councillor(s). They might have mates on the police authority, who might have words in the chief constable's ear.

G-CPTN
28th Apr 2012, 21:10
there may be some mileage in talking to your local councillor(s). They might have mates on the police authority,

In my case this was an exacerbating influence (the councillor being a solicitor's clerk).

Sprogget
28th Apr 2012, 21:18
Depending on where you live and what the local politics are, there may be some mileage in talking to your local councillor(s). They might have mates on the police authority, who might have words in the chief constable's ear. Rotten borough exemplified. Why should this ever, EVER be a necessary course? I've never been keen on the certain sense of self importance exhibited by the resident promise maker, but this is bottom of the barrel stuff.

Gertrude the Wombat
28th Apr 2012, 22:12
Why should this ever, EVER be a necessary course?
Didn't say it was. It's just one of several options - if one of my constituents came to be with a plausibly valid (rather than just plain mad) story about mistreatment by the police I would probably consult my colleagues on the police authority. Experience suggests that they would follow it up and get a resolution.

mini
28th Apr 2012, 23:35
No point complaining about a Copper, they'll always spoof ...

stuckgear
29th Apr 2012, 07:00
or get some video evidence.... 1280P HD Car DVR TFT 2.5" LCD IR Camera Video Recorder | eBay (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1280P-HD-Car-DVR-TFT-2-5-LCD-IR-Camera-Video-Recorder-/160601078737?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&hash=item256491fbd1)

UniFoxOs
30th Apr 2012, 07:46
I had been set-up on the instructions of a senior officer.

I'm still uncertain what was the original cause.

Didn't know it was his wife you were [email protected]?

Plod I know was heard to state, on the occasion when he was arranging harrassment of the bloke [email protected] his wife, "It's not harrassment if it isn't the same officer each time".

Seriously, Racedo, your mate should deffo install one of the items recommended by Stuckgear above (making 100% sure it is fitted legally), maybe also write a pre-emptive letter to the Clerk to the local Magistrates stating that he believes he is being harassed by plod, and requesting that the letter be retained for evidence in the event of him appearing in court for any "matter of opinion" offence, such as refusing a breath test, insulting a plod, attempting to pervert the course etc.

Cheers
UFO

PS Been intending to get one of these DVRs for the car for a while. Stuckgear's post prompted me to look at the one suggested. Some of the reviews were not brilliant, I've done a bit of research and decided to go for this (http://www.chinavasion.com/sports-action-camcorders/cvlldv51/) one, found a couple of good reviews, 43 delivered to UK.

Alloa Akbar
30th Apr 2012, 09:49
Sadly it seems these days that a large and growing number of plod are self obssessed morons and over-grown school bullies. I assume modern Police training is essentially recruit a bunch of retards and train them "Monkey see-monkey do" style?? It certainly seems that way..

Apologies to the Policemen out there who do actually realise that you are public servants, and treat the public as you would expect to be treated yourself.. I came out of the Stoke City v Arsenal game on Saturday and on the way to the car walked past a number of Police numpties standing around trying their best to look hard, apart from one WPC, who smiled pleasantly and offered a "Good evening sir".. How polite and pleasant.. It's that kind of behaviour that nurtures cooperation from the public when the Police need it.

racedo
30th Apr 2012, 18:31
Had a chat with mate in the Met down the pub last nite who basically said to get mate to
1.) Get a good solicitor who happy to get stuck in
2.) Make complaint direct to IPCC regarding both incidents.

Even if assault charge never reaches court the internal procedures will likely win out especially in current climate.
His view of assault copper was in expressions best not used in polite company.

Carry0nLuggage
1st May 2012, 07:49
racedo: And what was his view of the other cop who did nothing at the time?

racedo
1st May 2012, 20:11
racedo: And what was his view of the other cop who did nothing at the time?

Would never be in his unit or if she was would get rid, he ain't no angel I reckon but there is a line which most cops won't cross thankfully.............view was someone like this would get everybody in trouble.

Carry0nLuggage
2nd May 2012, 09:39
That's interesting and reassuring to know. I get the impression that usually what happens is that one officer acts like a complete <your choice of obscenity here>, but worse, others ignore it and close ranks.