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View Full Version : Don't people want work?


RedhillPhil
26th Apr 2012, 09:33
One often hears about there being no work about. I have a cooker that's about three years old. The left hand oven has stopped igniting in that the gas runs - I can light it with a match - but despite the igniters clicking it won't fire up. Seven - seven! - companies/cooker engineers that I've contacted who advertise themselves along the lines of "All makes of cooker repairs in Kent and Surrey" won't come out. "It's a bit far mate" was one reply. One bloke came, looked at it and stated, "It needs a new ignition pack, I'll get one ordered". That was the last that I heard from him. Another company gave me a time for their man to call. On the day before they rang, we can't get him to come out to you, he says that it's a bit far out for him but we'll arrange for another". Come the morning of the other, "I'm sorry but we can't get him either".
"Er, why are you advertising repairs in Surrey then"?
I live in a fair sized town 'twixt London and Brighton, on the A23 a stone's throw from both the M23 and M25. it's hardly le back de le beyond.
Grrrr!

handysnaks
26th Apr 2012, 09:45
You haven't got a nice display of knives and axes hanging on your hall wall have you?;)

Worrals in the wilds
26th Apr 2012, 09:47
Yep.
Trying to get a screen door installed at the moment. It would be quicker to learn metalwork, buy some flyscreen and manufacture my own.

green granite
26th Apr 2012, 09:56
It's not that they don't want to work it's about the money they don't make while they are spending say an hour and a half travelling outside their local area. A good service engineer would earn about 100 in that time by doing a couple of local calls.

Have you tried cleaning the spark gaps with a wire brush and resetting the gap? Or buy one of these

Slasher
26th Apr 2012, 09:59
You really ARE out in the wilds then Worrals? ;)

Worrals in the wilds
26th Apr 2012, 10:33
:mad: no. I'm in a major :mad:ing city with several :mad:ing providers of screen doors, all with fancy :mad:ing websites advertsing Doors To Your Door. :*

Was that Aussie enough? ;)
Seriously, if I was out in the Diamantina I could understand. Of course if I was in the Diamantina I could order a door off the internet, call the local government employed Q Build bloke and get him to install it for cash and a nice roast dinner once the door turned up on the weekly supplies truck. That would probably be more effective than the 'call us for a quote' method beloved by major city 'businesses'.

Maybe I'll have a crack at it myself, but it's a pain when you wave money around, announce to the world 'I want a screen door installed and I'll pay you cash' and you're greeted with a deafening lack of return phone calls by people who advertise that they install screen doors.
I'm not asking for a kitchen nuclear reactor...

tony draper
26th Apr 2012, 10:37
Surely travel time is covered by the call out charge? I assume there were call out charges?

Lon More
26th Apr 2012, 10:47
Worrals, any decent DIY store should have the makings of a screen door. If you've got a hacksaw and a pair of scissors it shouldn't take long to make one

Here's one (http://www.safetyscreens.co.uk/diy-fly-insect-screens.aspx) they made earlier

radeng
26th Apr 2012, 10:48
The guy who services my central heating came in March. 4 weeks later, central heating dies. Left message on his answering machine at 1700 on a Tuesday. 0830 Wednesday morning, he 'phones to ask if Wednesday afternoon is OK. Later that morning he calls to ask if he can come before lunch - no problem. Finds ignition transformer dead, and apparent blockage in new nozzle. Fixes it all, new nozzle, clean filter again, all working. Charged for transformer and 30 minutes of labour (he was on site for nearly an hour), no call out charge and no charge for the new nozzle.

So there are those tradesmen who will work, and not only do a good job, but go out of their way to give customer satisfaction.

Possibly because he's self employed and realises customers are worth keeping...

Slasher
26th Apr 2012, 10:52
I'm not asking for a kitchen nuclear reactor...


That's a shame Worrals - just happen to have one lying around here we don't use anymore...

http://www.picamatic.com/show/2012/04/26/02/52/8377149_500x388.jpg

radeng
26th Apr 2012, 10:59
Slasher,

Is that the cue for the 'Engineer's Song?'

Worrals in the wilds
26th Apr 2012, 10:59
Very cute. :)
Thanks for the info, Lon More.

Ancient Observer
26th Apr 2012, 11:31
I have an oldish but reliable do-it-all tv tuner/dvd recorder/hdd/tape recorder player. I have probably not described it well, but you get the idea.

It died one day for no apparent reason.

I did all the Internet research, and found out that there were 2 likely causes. As I am non-techie, they were Greek to me.

However, finding someone who was interested in repairing it was a major exercise. No-on wanted to know, and no internet search helped.

Eventually, I asked John Lewis, (a largish brit retailer of many things, including clever boxes) who did their repairs. Helpful lady at John Lewis took my postcode, played for 30 seconds on her pc and gave me two addresses/phone numbers.
Both of these repairers were in modest, unimpressive sheds in less than glamourous locations. Both run by folk who appeared completely bonkers, but brilliant. Very reasonable prices.

So, Mr Redhill, find out from John Lewis who does their work down in darkest Surrey.

Carry0nLuggage
26th Apr 2012, 11:45
I could do with a kitchen nuclear reactor.

So many recipes have the instruction to fry the onions (usually) for 4 mins until soft; and you think, WTF are they cooking on to do it that quickly? A nuclear reactor?????

RedhillPhil
26th Apr 2012, 12:22
Update: Took horrible hairy Harry out for his morning constitutional, returned home to find a letter from new World cookers. "Your guarantee is about to expire, would you like to extend it for 99.00"?
New World approved engineer is on his way on an "if we can't fix it we'll supply a new cooker basis".
Result! (and a lesson in keeping up with the paperwork).

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2012, 12:26
Extreme cooking:
One of the first things taught on a scuba diving instructors course is how to get a BBQ ready in 5 minutes. Pressurised air; wonderful stuff!

Also, you can make ice cream in 2 minutes with Liquid Nitrogen.

tony draper
26th Apr 2012, 13:11
Not a single TV Electrical kit repair shop round here now,used to be two withing walking distance of me,peeps dont seem to get stuff fixed now, the back lanes round here are full of fridges washing machines hoovers TVs left out for the bin man on bin day.
Suits the manufacturers they dont want you to get electrical gear fettled they want you to go out and buy new stuff.
:uhoh:

Tableview
26th Apr 2012, 13:22
Have just thrown away a 4 year old fridge because nobody could regas it. Too expensive, too much trouble, too far, 'elf and safety .......

When I were a lad you could get shoes re-soled, clothes fixed, radios repaired, etc. Now if you try to these thing you're treated with contempt. And don't talk to me about Timpsons! When I travelled a lot for work I used to take all my 'old' clothes and shoes to South America, mostly Colombia, where they were returned looking better than new for a few pennies.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2012, 13:26
Very complex issue this one.
Building stuff to be repairable is expensive, in materials, specifications and using more experienced engineers to design them.
Then there's the cost of supply networks, and the cost of stocking spares for fixing 50 year old models. It also restricts development, since every modified part now needs its own stock.
And there have to be enough engineers/repairmen who can fix them for a reasonable price. Labour costs are much higher (proportionately) now.
There's also progress. No point building stuff to last 50 years if everyone chucks it in 5 because it's obsolete (e.g. Sony Walkmen).
And lastly there's price. Non-fixable stuff is cheaper to purchase, and a higher proportion of people buy on that alone. Those people may be idiots, but many companies that held to good engineering principles have gone bust.

tony draper
26th Apr 2012, 13:28
Shoes? we could only dream of shoes. :( :rolleyes:

hellsbrink
26th Apr 2012, 13:49
Extreme cooking:
One of the first things taught on a scuba diving instructors course is how to get a BBQ ready in 5 minutes. Pressurised air; wonderful stuff!

Pah, that's slow!!

The "world record", by a certain George Goble, was having 60lbs of charcoal lit and ready to cook on in THREE SECONDS (ok, 40lbs burned off in the initial fireball, but it was ready to cook on in 3s).




Liquid oxygen can be soooo much fun!!

Engineer BBQs (http://www.summitlake.com/Humor/Engineer_BBQ.php)

George Goble (GHG) [EXTENDED HOME PAGE] (http://web.archive.org/web/20021003203611/ghg.ecn.purdue.edu/~ghg/)

sab2Ltm1WcM

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2012, 13:58
It's hardly "ready to cook on" if you've melted the bloody barbie.

Reminds me of a squadron pilot interrupting our two JEngOs discussing how long it took to drop an engine out.
"I can do it in 3 seconds"
"How?"
"Sidewinder!":E

corsair
26th Apr 2012, 15:54
Sometimes it is surprising how difficult it is to get people to do some work for you even in the midst of a recession. Had to get a new gas boiler in the house my wife rents out. We got someone, he told us the price and we agreed. He turned up a couple of times but there were always excuses and the weeks dragged on. Eventually we got fed up and to him to eff off. Got someone else. It was installed in a couple of days plus a bit of troubleshooting. No idea why the first guy apparently didn't want to make any money.

It happens with big companies too. The same house previously needed a new kitchen, eventually my wife decided on a kitchen from B&Q. The rep came and measured up. We agreed the deal and ordered it. Then we waited and waited and waited. My wife rang several times but could never get in contact with the representative again. It was unbelievable. She eventually got her supervisor but it got more unbelievable as he couldn't help, didn't know when the kitchen would be fitted and could offer no reason for the delay at all.

So we went elsewhere.

rgbrock1
26th Apr 2012, 15:57
I personally think there's another term for people who don't want work: laziness.

vee-tail-1
26th Apr 2012, 16:07
Well some people are really nice:
Just fitted two very expensive French doors to our barn. Took me ages to get it done, and then the door lock jammed. Called the man in the factory who had given me detailed instructions on how to DIY these normally factory fitted doors. He sucked in on his teeth and said "You must hit the lock very hard with a hammer" OMG! You want me to hit my new doors with a hammer?! "It's the only way" he said.... I spent the rest of the day looking at my lovely doors with their new shining glass and paint .... I tried everything possible to unjam the lock, but to no avail.
Then I thought of the engineer in the factory, and somehow I trusted him, something in his voice and manner. So the deed had to be done ... with my largest hammer I approached the beautiful doors ... there was only one chance to get it right .. any misjudgement and my doors would be ruined. One trial swing with the enormous hammer to get the distance and then one huge blow directly on top of the offending lock. With a sharp crack the lock barrel broke in two and the parts fell cleanly out of each side of the doors ready to be replaced with a new lock. For me the greatest satisfaction was to have trusted a stranger and have that trust rewarded ... sometimes people are really nice :)

G-CPTN
26th Apr 2012, 16:19
With a sharp crack the lock barrel broke in two and the parts fell cleanly out of each side of the doors.
So much for the security of your home . . .

vee-tail-1
26th Apr 2012, 16:29
Ah not so insecure because I had to take off the external door handles (via screws accessed only from inside) before getting access to the lock barrel.

tony draper
26th Apr 2012, 16:37
Lady a few doors up from me locked herself out so naturally she knocked on my door,I knew in theory how to do a yale lock but I was a bit shocked when I did it for real at just how fast I had her door open.
:rolleyes:

sitigeltfel
26th Apr 2012, 18:30
Ah not so insecure because I had to take off the external door handles (via screws accessed only from inside) before getting access to the lock barrel.

I have seen that done by a locksmith on this type of barrel, but with two pairs of mole grips and a sharp twist.

http://a248.e.akamai.net/origin-cdn.volusion.com/bwbt5.h6xh7/v/vspfiles/photos/Era%20EED3555B-1.jpg

You can see the obvious weak point where the retaining screw goes.

Anyway........

What a shower! Business tries to recruit seven jobless people... but NONE turned up because it RAINED | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2135447/What-shower-Business-tries-recruit-seven-jobless-people--NONE-turned-RAINED.html)

Fareastdriver
26th Apr 2012, 19:05
I have my stuff insured with Domestic & General. In the last ten years two new washing machines, a new DVD recorder and nearly a new dishwasher. The only thing running at a loss is the Central Heating boiler. Beats looking for someone to fix them.

flying lid
26th Apr 2012, 20:46
A man jumps out of an airplane with a parachute on his back. As he's falling, he realizes hiss chute is broken. He doesn't know anything about parachutes, but as the earth rapidly approaches, he realizes his options are limited; he takes off the parachute and tries to fix it himself on the way down. The wind is ripping past his face, he's dropping like a rock, and at 5000 feet, another man goes shooting up past him. In desperation, the man with the chute looks up and yells, "Hey do you know anything about parachutes?!"

The guy flying up looks down and yells, "No, do you know anything about gas cookers ??????

Lid

tony draper
26th Apr 2012, 21:35
Anyway with electronic kit these days there is no way even a skilled shed owner could fettle summat like a motherboard with a soldering iron,only thing to do now is become a board swapper,then it would probably cost as much to locate and get a new board or component as it would be to buy a replacement bit of kit.
That's why crumblies like me like old stuff one can still take a meter to.
:uhoh:

mixture
26th Apr 2012, 21:56
Also, you can make ice cream in 2 minutes with Liquid Nitrogen.

Heston Blumenthal obviously hasn't made it to Canada yet then ? :E

Fox3WheresMyBanana
26th Apr 2012, 22:34
Nope, thank God.
We just club baby seals for entertainment here, or is he doing Mashed Seal as well now?

ricardian
26th Apr 2012, 23:48
The guy who services my central heating came in March. 4 weeks later, central heating dies. Left message on his answering machine at 1700 on a Tuesday. 0830 Wednesday morning, he 'phones to ask if Wednesday afternoon is OK. Later that morning he calls to ask if he can come before lunch - no problem. Finds ignition transformer dead, and apparent blockage in new nozzle. Fixes it all, new nozzle, clean filter again, all working. Charged for transformer and 30 minutes of labour (he was on site for nearly an hour), no call out charge and no charge for the new nozzle.
So there are those tradesmen who will work, and not only do a good job, but go out of their way to give customer satisfaction.
Possibly because he's self employed and realises customers are worth keeping...
On Good Friday our tumble drier suddenly stopped working. Rang the island's kitchen machinery Mr Fixit who turned up an hour later with a spare drier to tide us over while he fettled our broken drier. Two weeks later he re-appeared to announce that our old drier had a burnt out motor but he had an identical model (from Freegle) with a burnt out heater. He'd fettled a working drier from the two machines. Total cost 35. Magic!

Solar
27th Apr 2012, 00:00
It's not entirely the peoples fault.
When I left the army in 1972 I went to the local dole office and requested enrolement at one of the Goverment engineering training establishments which was no problem though the only placement was 20 miles away to which I had no problems with.
Two letters arrived a couple of days later one telling me that I had been accepted to the training center and one offering me a job at a local mill.
Back to the dole office to clarify things as I really wanted to go to the training center.
They said not to worry the job offer was standard and didn't affect me.
I said thats grand but why is the folks that I left school with and still not working not at the mill and the answer was they don't have to as it's more than three miles away WTF.
I know things have changed but you can see where the mind set would come from.

Loose rivets
27th Apr 2012, 04:27
Anyway with electronic kit these days there is no way even a skilled shed owner could fettle summat like a motherboard with a soldering iron


Aint that the truth! And I tried. Re-balling . . . I thought they were kidding on the computer forum. Re-balling? Boiling the old chip off and scattering hundreds of .6mm balls of solder where the chip is going to go. It has to be some sort of a joke. Anyway, the joke was on me. Worked for a while, then failed again.

I was a television techie from the age of 14. City and Guilds and all that. Often wonder what life would have been like if I'd not fallen in love with airyplanes. Still have to have a workbench for electrickery. This one, $20 on me neighbor's drive, and a bit of glue and polish and back in business.

Still, gearboxes have taken over my karma in latter years. The MB joke of a car with its computerized hyper-sonic, think for you dumbcluck, philosophy, and now it's the rather more modest Oldsmobile Silhouette that's driving me insane. Like the MB, it's insured, but even AAMCO, a nationwide 'Transmission' company, have had it out 3 times to get it right. It would have been easier to learn about auto-boxes, then do it myself - about the only job I haven't been able to tackle over the years. Not that hard, just takes CARE. They made mistake after mistake, but couldn't fob me off. So sad, seemed such nice old guys that ran the franchise.