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haughtney1
22nd Apr 2012, 10:28
Sat here on my couch as I am, I note with interest that there is not one white face in the lead pack, women or men.....have us whiteys become a bunch of lazy useless fat can't run layabouts?
Personally I'd rather drive 26 miles than run it....but then I enjoy my chips and beer.
Discuss please:E

PS, I'm just waiting for a protestor from the hackney branch of the "socialist one legged lesbian women's collective" to try and disrupt the women's race on the grounds that it encourages rape or something or other....

stuckgear
22nd Apr 2012, 10:39
lazy useless fat can't run layabouts?



talking of which, though 'can't' is mis-spelled in this instance, Ed Balls is doing the marathon...

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/04/21/article-0-12B44B2A000005DC-174_468x312.jpg

a protestor from the hackney branch of the "socialist one legged lesbian women's collective" to try and disrupt the women's race on the grounds that it encourages rape or something or other....

oh i so want to bite off on that one !!

beaufort1
22nd Apr 2012, 11:40
Come on Lee Merrien, it would be nice to see another Guernsey Olympian. :ok:

FlyerFoto
22nd Apr 2012, 11:42
I can't watch it any more - not after watching 'Four Lions' the other night....!

Dan Gerous
22nd Apr 2012, 11:46
Is it true that the serious runners are using starting blocks this year, to try and shave a hundreth of one second off last years time?:)

blue up
22nd Apr 2012, 12:02
Mum and Dad did it last year. They didn't make record speed, though that isn't too much of a suprise, what with Dad having snapped his Achilles tendon 6 months before and Mum breaking her wrist during a fall a few minutes before the start.
Still, not bad for people in their mid seventies.;)

B Fraser
22nd Apr 2012, 12:05
It's very un-PC but the truth is that us North Europeans have evolved shorter achilles tendons at some point after we walked out of Africa.

Looking at it the other way, there are not many dark people to be found in the swimming pools at the olympics. Maybe it's to do with the distribution of body mass, bone density or something else.

Let's just hope that the huggy fluffs don't start messing around with quotas so the sports continue with the very best fighting it out amongst themselves.

stuckgear
22nd Apr 2012, 12:15
Let's just hope that the huggy fluffs don't start messing around with quotas so the sports continue with the very best fighting it out amongst themselves.


well i think that the prerequisites for the 100m hurdles are discriminatory toward the height challenged and body mass challenged*.




*In non PC speak read as midgets and fat people.

hellsbrink
22nd Apr 2012, 12:25
Looking at it the other way, there are not many dark people to be found in the swimming pools at the olympics. Maybe it's to do with the distribution of body mass, bone density or something else.

IIRC, it's something more to do with higher bone density that means there is an issue with swimming, but that also means that they can have higher muscle density hung on dem bones. That gives you an obvious advantage in quite a lot of sports......

Future 737NG pic(?)
22nd Apr 2012, 12:57
I wonder if the physiological differences between East Africans and the rest of the World can be attributed to the technique of 'persistence hunting' employed by some tribes.

No need for endurance capability if one's tribe launches projectiles at one's prey.

Human Mammal, Human Hunter - Attenborough - Life of Mammals - BBC - YouTube

Ghost Vector
22nd Apr 2012, 13:37
We ate grubs, so we in the north evolved into couch cushions and became very, very resourceful with hand tools. Besides, this Bushman in the vid is wearing reboks. Pah, anybody can run down a Kudu in Reboks.

probes
22nd Apr 2012, 14:56
Once upon a time I was in the 'support team' for an ironman triathlon competitor. I won't discuss how he needed my spouse's help to shower after the swim (fingers too frozen for anything), how I had to squeeze a lemon on a mop or something for cleaning the handlebars of his bike of the stuff that had been used all over the body not to freeze in the quite cold water (and it squirted into the eye of my spouse who was driving :E - well, we're both alive, thanks for asking) and how the first one in the race was taken away with severe cramps in his feet, I'd just describe how we were waiting in the finish, with another supporter whom I did not know. He kept saying: "Totally crazy, aren't they totally crazy??!!" - then was quiet for a minute or so and then said: "I think I'll come too, next year."

B Fraser
22nd Apr 2012, 15:06
No need for endurance capability if one's tribe launches projectiles at one's prey.

You mean like lobbing a brick at a Greggs van in Walsall ?

Future 737NG pic(?)
22nd Apr 2012, 18:26
You mean like lobbing a brick at a Greggs van in Walsall ?

You'd like to think that the method of obtaining a meal in the West Midlands had become more refined in the past 4,000-odd years... :E


I can relate to the anecdote given by probes. I suffered around the 22-mile mark in both my previous marathons and vowed to never sign-up for another one - my build is just not one of your archetypal endurance runner.

I'll see what my thoughts are after I complete the one in Berlin this September!

stuckgear
22nd Apr 2012, 18:38
I suffered around the 22-mile mark in both my previous marathons and vowed to never sign-up for another one - my build is just not one of your archetypal endurance runner.




you could always just opt for taking driving lessons

B Fraser
22nd Apr 2012, 19:41
I can speak from personal experience from the London Marathon, I hit the wall at around the 22 mile mark. I had to change the channel and watch something else.

;)

ZOOKER
22nd Apr 2012, 19:44
Do you mean The London Snickers?

11Fan
22nd Apr 2012, 20:55
So, Run, Fatboy, Run was a farce?

ShyTorque
22nd Apr 2012, 21:37
You mean like lobbing a brick at a Greggs van in Walsall ?

:D:D:ok:

Mind you, you'd possibly get healthier food catching the other sort of "grub".

vulcanised
22nd Apr 2012, 22:38
No interest at all in the event but impossible to avoid various accounts including all the adulation and hype on the BBC website.

They don't seem to have noticed that a competitor collapsed and died.

stuckgear
22nd Apr 2012, 22:43
impossible to avoid various accounts including all the adulation and hype on the BBC website.

They don't seem to have noticed that a competitor collapsed and died.

not Ed Balls then.. the BBC flags would be half mast and the BBC would be proposing canonisation.

reynoldsno1
23rd Apr 2012, 00:30
I hit the wall at around the 22 mile mark
I keep reading about this, and I still don't understand why the runners don't just go round it ...

stumpey
23rd Apr 2012, 00:44
Maybe their just practising for when we ask to check their documents? :E

Ghost Vector
23rd Apr 2012, 07:24
Did someone say that nobody noticed a computer collapsed and died? Heartless basterds. This world is over.

im from uranus
23rd Apr 2012, 07:52
Last month I read this (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-17465047) on the BBC news..

Race directors Dave Bedford and Hugh Brasher confirmed the rules have been altered.
"Our policy on this area has evolved and we do have to have a cut-off point and to restrict finish results and finishers medals to those competitors who finish the event before 18:00 BST on the same day of the start of the event," they said in a statement.
Then yesterday I read this (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17743915), also on the beeb..

When Claire sets out with participants on Sunday she knows that most will aim to finish in hours. For her, it will take about three weeks.Have I missed something?? :confused:
Or does someone not like Mr Scott? :ouch:

SilsoeSid
25th Apr 2012, 15:48
Race directors Dave Bedford and Hugh Brasher confirmed the rules have been altered.
"Our policy on this area has evolved and we do have to have a cut-off point and to restrict finish results and finishers medals to those competitors who finish the event before 18:00 BST on the same day of the start of the event," they said in a statement.

We were talking about this on the train to Blackheath on Sunday and it was commented on how disgraceful it is that people completing the marathon such as Claire, under the new rulings would be denied a finishers medal. Isn't this kind of achievement what it is all about?

The organisers were more than happy to accept the entries from these brave people knowing the publicity would be good for the event, as it was in the past when others such as Phil Packer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Packer) completed it, but I bet it's now kept quiet that Claire won't be getting a medal when she finishes.


According to London Marathon Race Results 2012 (http://www.marathonguide.com/results/browse.cfm?MIDD=16120422) 2,736 finishers won't be getting a medal. Despite what the evolution of the event has done, I wonder what would be the best thing to do, bin the leftover 3,000 medals or give them to those that finished? :rolleyes: