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ChristiaanJ
17th Oct 2011, 23:05
Slightly weird tale.... We seem to have just 'acquired' a new domestic animal.

Or rather, he (or she) walked in one evening, from the garden, and started nibbling from the cat's bowl ('croquettes'), then hid among the odds and ends in my downstairs 'office', or 'den' or whatever you want to call it.

Looking for a place to hibernate? (already? it isn't really cold here yet - S. of France).

Managed to pick it up one evening (with gloves) and put it outside, but it was back the next evening. It wasn't even phased when I took some photos (which didn't come out).

I don't mind in the slightest giving it 'house-room', but I'm not honestly sure that is a good idea.....

Anybody here with a similar experience and useful suggestions?

Oh, and neither our cat nor the dog seem to be bothered in the slightests.

CJ

Airborne Aircrew
17th Oct 2011, 23:10
They carry a lot of fleas and mites... If you are going to let it hang out then you will need to take that into account.

piggybank
17th Oct 2011, 23:13
Yes hedgehogs a good memory from my childhood. My old grandmother fed them milk and water in a saucer and they would be daily, evening visitors for years on end. No the dogs and cats leave them alone for good reason. they will do no harm round the garden and a novelty for visiting kiddies to see. Cheap to feed. On a slightly different note we also let a guinea pig free after he kept getting colds and the thing wandered round various gardens and would be back every day for a meal and clear off again. In the cold weather he would move into the shed. being outside probably extended his life a bit as he died of old age at ten.

G-CPTN
17th Oct 2011, 23:13
Ticks, too. . .

Keef
17th Oct 2011, 23:20
They are endearing creatures, but as said above, usually infested with unpleasant bugs.

I'd try to introduce it to your shed - maybe even the box where your tortoise hibernates. I wouldn't encourage it to spend the winter in the house.

ShyTorque
17th Oct 2011, 23:26
We've had a huge one in the garden this warm autumn. The Russell Terrier hates it being around and barks his stupid head off at it. I think it may have taken the hint as I've not seen it of late and the dog always finds it.

I wouldn't allow one in the house, for reasons already stated. I'd say let it stay out and feed on the slugs, so it earns its place like it's designed to do. :)

G-CPTN
17th Oct 2011, 23:31
The minimum weight to see them through the winter is 450gms (1lb) and any hedgehog below this weight is likely to have problems. However many hedgehog carers prefer to get their autumn juveniles up to 600gms (1lb 6oz) or more to give them an extra edge. Autumn juveniles i.e. youngsters found alone under this critical weight after the end of September, will need extra help even if it is just additional feeding in the garden.
From:- British Hedgehog Preservation Society (http://www.britishhedgehogs.org.uk/FAQS/general.htm)

DX Wombat
17th Oct 2011, 23:39
Hedgehogs are great outside the house. You can buy special hedgehog houses http://thumbs2.ebaystatic.com/m/mm3pS-vC4WkuXVEIuoJlX_A/140.jpg for them to overwinter in or just give them a big pile of twigs and leaves.
DIY hut ready for hedgehog to fill with dried leaves etc.
http://www.britishhedgehogs.org.uk/FAQS/hedgehog_homes_files/image004.jpg
Please don't give them milk, it gives them dreadful diarrhoea. :{
There is lots of useful information here. (http://www.britishhedgehogs.org.uk/)

jimtherev
17th Oct 2011, 23:42
Yes to fleas, which are transferrable: my cat used to share his grub with a 'hog outside the back door. I once had pics of this: they seemed to get on very amicably. However, cat would then wander about the house, generously donating sundry insect life to people, carpets, furniture. Tried moving the food bowl indoors instead, but cat didn't like that - 'twas why it had moved outside in the first place. Eventually hog stopped coming.

Years later I was told that I had probably killed it: lots of milk (and how the little beggar liked milk!) gives 'em dir... diarrh... diar... the shits and they can get very ill.

If 'twas me, sorry Mr hog.

Crossed with DX - sorry.

ZOOKER
17th Oct 2011, 23:47
We have two in our garden, snuffling about.
Animals are great, they don't tell lies. :ok:

Solid Rust Twotter
18th Oct 2011, 06:57
Bugs? Nothing a dusting of flea powder or a drop of flea control liquid on the back, same as the mogg, won't sort out.

henry crun
18th Oct 2011, 07:38
Don't know if it is the same in UK, but in NZ as well as fleas & mites, hedgehogs carry ringworm.

alfaman
18th Oct 2011, 09:35
Bugs? Nothing a dusting of flea powder or a drop of flea control liquid on the back, same as the mogg, won't sort out. er, will sort it out - permanently! My mum tried that trick when she was a kid, killed the fleas & the hedgehog...

McGoonagall
18th Oct 2011, 09:43
What is it with hedgehogs? Why cant they just share?

MagnusP
18th Oct 2011, 11:38
Very fond of bugs and slugs, hedgehogs are. 200g per night, so good little pest controllers.

Storminnorm
18th Oct 2011, 11:42
Lived in a caravan for a while in Luton. (Shame).
Used to get regular visits from a hedgehog.
It loved a bit of dog food being left out for it.
It turned up one night with a couple of tiny baby Hogs.
I've never heard so much squeaking!!!
They were just Gorgeous little things.
Fed them all for ages after that, then we left and went to
Holland after Court Line went bust.
Often wonder if the descendants are still around.

radeng
18th Oct 2011, 12:01
How do hedgehogs gave sex?













Very carefully!

sitigeltfel
18th Oct 2011, 12:18
Although hedgehogs will happily scoff milk and bread it is bad for them and gives them the squits. Some pet foods are OK though.

Epping Forest Hedgehog Rescue - Feeding Hedgehogs (http://www.thehedgehog.co.uk/diet.htm)

Found one dead in the garden a few weeks ago. It had tried to get through a chain link fence and got its head stuck, poor little sod!

MagnusP
18th Oct 2011, 12:58
How do hedgehogs gave sex?

Very carefully!

I used to think that but, oddly, it simply ain't so! The male's penis is in the centre of his abdomen, and the female can arch her tail up to present her vulva for access.

Don't ask; I have no idea how or why I know that. :uhoh:

rmcb
18th Oct 2011, 13:26
the female can arch her tail up to present her vulva for access.

Sounds like an average girl out on an average night in New Cross.

Hedgehogs are great!

It turned up one night with a couple of tiny baby Hogs

Especially with a conger of babies in tow.

Airborne Aircrew
18th Oct 2011, 14:24
Especially with a conger of babies in tow.

There is something cuter than mummy Hedgehog and a line of kids... The same thing but in, believe it or not, Skunks... But you don't go as close to the Skunks... :\

MagnusP
18th Oct 2011, 14:36
Especially with a conger of babies in tow.

I had conger and chips last time I was in Chile. Delicious.

Conga, perhaps? ;)

aviate1138
18th Oct 2011, 16:06
A couple of handfuls of mud to cover the spines then on the barby with the odd turn/rotation until cooked. Upon removal when a little cooler, the skin and spines come off with the now brick hard clay. Tasty Mr/Mrs Hedgepig.

TIC :rolleyes:

Airborne Aircrew
18th Oct 2011, 18:44
A couple of handfuls of mud to cover the spines then on the barby with the odd turn/rotation until cooked. Upon removal when a little cooler, the skin and spines come off with the now brick hard clay. Tasty Mr/Mrs Hedgepig.That was the Romany way... ;)

PS: Don't try this with Skunks... :eek:

rmcb
18th Oct 2011, 20:05
Go to the nearest country road and you can get them ready prepared spatchcocked.

ChristiaanJ
18th Oct 2011, 20:34
Thanks to all for your replies.

And no, I wasn't looking for a recipe, aviate.
I don't eat cats (as substitutes for rabbit) or dogs (as in the FE) either...;

I knew about the various parasites (fleas, ticks, etc.), but thanks for the reminder. I may give dog and cat another early dose, just in case.

Bugs? Nothing a dusting of flea powder or a drop of flea control liquid on the back, same as the mogg, won't sort out.
er, will sort it out - permanently! My mum tried that trick when she was a kid, killed the fleas & the hedgehog... Thanks for the warning, I won't try that, then.

Very fond of bugs and slugs, hedgehogs are. 200g per night, so good little pest controllers.From what I read already, seems that's what they also get their ringworm from....

I readily admit to a soft spot for them..... saw my fiirst one when I was six or seven, at my grandparents' place.

What baffles me personally, is how it got into the garden in the first place.... since it's surrounded by a roughly 8ft stone wall all around. Overgrown wall (ivy, etc.) admittedly. And it's not the first one I've seen over the years here either, even if none ventured inside the house before.

DX Wombat,
Thanks for the pic and the links.
Pic looks much like the shambles in the back of my room (except for the leaves), so maybe that's what attracted it. Still, I'll see if I can arrange something like that outside...

CJ

Cornish Jack
18th Oct 2011, 21:47
Re. hedhehogs and milk, it's cow's milk that causes the problems - goat's milk is fine, apparently. That snippet of info came from St Tiggywinkles when we asked about dealing with a batch of orphans. They also recommended puppy food as a diet, if needed. Both items worked and the recipients grew well (and noisily!!). One of the most endearing sights was watching them walking, from the rear. Their feet, underneath, look just like tiny versions of human feet.

DX Wombat
18th Oct 2011, 23:46
What baffles me personally, is how it got into the garden in the first placeThey can climb and the ivy-covered walls would not have presented your hedgehog with much of a problem.

ChristiaanJ
18th Oct 2011, 23:50
Re. hedhehogs and milk, it's cow's milk that causes the problems - goat's milk is fine, apparently.Can't get that here, so I just make sure there's at least a bowl of water.
They also recommended puppy food as a diet, if needed.Thanks for the hint. I'll ask the vet shortly (cat food running out, LOL). So far the cats nibbles seem to go down a treat.

CJ

G-CPTN
18th Oct 2011, 23:53
G16bFKKfmlgZn1gnzaq-jI

ChristiaanJ
18th Oct 2011, 23:56
They can climb and the ivy-covered walls would not have presented your hedgehog with much of a problem.Thanks.
I suspected as much, but I did wonder.

BTW, (s)he's still there... just scuttled away behind me when I was trying to take a pic....

CJ

ChristiaanJ
19th Oct 2011, 00:12
G-CPTN,
Thanks for the videos.
And yes, our wall is old stone, and overgrown, so (s)he would have had no trouble, judging from those.

Why choose our garden, with a resident dog and cat? That's still beyond me.
Anyway (s)he's welcome.

CJ

Rollingthunder
19th Oct 2011, 00:54
http://shechive.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/cute-hedgehog-17.jpg?w=500&h=332

603DX
19th Oct 2011, 00:57
Delightful thread, Christiaan, reminded me of the episode in my garden several years back. I kept an old cardboard box on the floor in my garage with several rags in it for polishing the car. One day I reached inside to pull out a soft piece of old cotton shirt, and out tumbled a not very active hedgehog with it. After the initial shock (it's well known that we're big girl's blouses over unexpected wildlife down in the South of England), I decided it was probably just trying to hibernate, and carefully wrapped it back in the cloth, and replaced it in the box.

It stayed put for several weeks, and I tried not to disturb it too much with my comings and goings with the car, not revving the engine, and opening and closing the up-and-over door as quietly as possible. My children were quite young then, and they liked to have a quiet peep every now and then at the snoozing scrubbing-brush with legs. We told the neighbours about it, and I liked to think that my "green" credentials went up a bit.

If you have tears to shed, prepare to shed them now ..... One dark day I carefully raised the garage door, slid into the car and started up as usual. Slowly, with engine idling, I edged backwards until I felt a gentle bump. I stopped at once, but it was too late. Mrs (or Mr) Tiggy-winkle had apparently awoken and wandered around beneath the car. We were just about to go out on a family trip, and the sad little bundle on the concrete floor couldn't be hidden. Of course, it was Daddy's fault, no question about it, and three pairs of accusing eyes followed me around for the rest of the day. Four, if I'm honest, I wasn't my wife's favourite husband either.

The end of the saga was marked by interment in a shoebox in the nearby woods, which must now be fairly full of assorted cats, hamsters, gerbils and the like from our household and many others in the neighbourhood. I like to think the kids have forgiven me now, particularly as they too are now the designated undertakers for my grandchildren's pets, waifs and strays.

G-CPTN
19th Oct 2011, 01:12
Why choose our garden, with a resident dog and cat?
Regular supplies of food.

Worrals in the wilds
19th Oct 2011, 03:53
Aren't they sweet! Thanks for the videos, I didn't realise they were as active as that.

Blacksheep
19th Oct 2011, 08:10
Mrs BS had been in UK for only a few months. One day she went off to the shops in our village (Bampton in the Bush, Oxon) and came scampering back to say that she had encountered a wild beast that crouched ready to pounce on her. I went to investigate and found a hedgehog on the "Blacky path" warily uncoiling itself after its scary encounter with an asian immigrant. Mrs BS has been rather fond of hedghogs ever since. :)

DX Wombat
19th Oct 2011, 12:08
BS :) I find hedgehogs delightful and would be very happy if one set up home in the garden. Just a word of caution, if you have a pond please make sure there is an escape route for any hedgehog which may fall in.

gingernut
19th Oct 2011, 21:56
Had one at the bottom of me 'edge once, squealing away, was caught in the remains of a Tesco carrier bag - unwrapped it, and it shot off like a lad in' a widda.

er340790
19th Oct 2011, 22:34
In France, so just be careful of RABIES.

Used to have a hedgehog in UK years ago. They thrive on dry dog-food mix. All our dogs used to accept it, apart from the Jack Russell (predictable really). Hedgehog always won though - would have to get welding gauntlets and pliers and pull quills out of the Russell's snout every month or so.

We just gave it a cardboard box in the garage, full of old fleeces and rolled-up newspapers to sleep / hibernate in. Never heard any complaints and he stuck around for 3-4 years. ;)

ChristiaanJ
19th Oct 2011, 23:02
In France, so just be careful of RABIES. Not endemic locally, luckily.

Used to have a hedgehog in UK years ago. They thrive on dry dog-food mix. All our dogs used to accept it, apart from the Jack Russell (predictable really). Hedgehog always won though - would have to get welding gauntlets and pliers and pull quills out of the Russell's snout every month or so.

We just gave it a cardboard box in the garage, full of old fleeces and rolled-up newspapers to sleep / hibernate in. Never heard any complaints and he stuck around for 3-4 years. ;)Thanks for the hints.
Our dog is a Labrador.... not even sure she's fully aware of the new visitor - no confrontations yet, so far. Even the cat doesn't seem overly bothered about sharing its bowl....
So far, (s)he seems to prefer the shambles inside the house, but if I can find a way to convince her/him to find a space in the shed (also full of a shambles of cardboard boxes, rags, etc.) so much the better.

CJ

OFSO
20th Oct 2011, 10:12
Rabies ? Isn't any rabies around here, hasn't been for at least twenty years according to our local vet - and this bit of Spain joins on to that bit of France......same applies to Germany and Austria, although they have the tick-as-carrier problem which we don't.

ChristiaanJ
2nd Nov 2011, 00:08
Just in case anybody following this thread is still interested....
(S)he's still around, enjoying the cat food....
Most evenings there's a sudden crunching noise behind my back, and if I turn round very carefully I can catch a glimpse of her(him) nibbling away.

Starting to wonder about providing some hibernation nesting material (rags, a cardboard box?)... At the moment (s)he is just hiding behind a cupboard.

CJ

PS I mentioned our friend to the vet, and he did confirm the cat food was fine.

DX Wombat
2nd Nov 2011, 00:17
Get a small pack of hay from your local pet shop and gather up about a carrier bagful of dry leaves and place them near an upturned cardboard box, with a few bits inside it, so that the hedgehog can decorate the box in accordance with best Hedgehog Feng Shui practice.

fernytickles
2nd Nov 2011, 13:54
Great thread :ok:

Not sure if a fb link will work unless you already have a fb account, but a guy who lives near us in the Midwest found a baby chipmunk recently. His photos & updates on it are fantastic and have become required daily viewing. Emma, the cat, even seems to have taken a gentle liking to her, and they play together.

Welcome to Facebook - Log In, Sign Up or Learn More (http://www.facebook.com/#!/ChippyChipmunk)

Just a small sample.....

http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/297898_294661250558145_278217535535850_1092099_264699357_n.j pg

http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/295728_289983801025890_278217535535850_1070261_2037958345_n. jpg

http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/296053_282162575141346_278217535535850_1044015_342821107_n.j pg

ChristiaanJ
2nd Nov 2011, 19:05
fernytickles,
Thanks for that link. Great story.
Unfortunately, 'Prickly' is not nearly as tame.....

DX Wombat,
Thanks for the hints, I'll see what I can do.
I think (s)he needs a better 'home', rather than hiding behind a cupboard.
No dry leaves at the moment (it's been bucketing down here), but maybe some hay from a pet store would be a good idea.

CJ