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Steamer Ned
12th Oct 2011, 13:26
Having spent some years on the observation deck, I've now paid the required bribe to security and crept my way to the debating floor.

In all the ever-expanding hype surrounding London 2012 (the word 'Olympics' seems to be progressively disappearing from the 'brand positioning statement') I'm wondering how it is that the home-nation's sporting representatives are collectively described as 'Team GB'?

Over half a century ago when I was a snot-covered oik at junior school, one of the few things that registered was that the top-level name for the nation was 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland', mercifully shortened to 'The UK'.

At the opening ceremony next year, can we expect Northern Ireland to march in separately from Team GB? When one of their athletes has 'medalled' (bleh) will there be a separate flag and anthem? Have I missed something? Does it matter? Nurse, where's my lunch?

Sorry ... I'm sure that the assembled ranks of JB's finest can help, especially all you expats and citizens of the erstwhile colonies who seem to observe the Old Country with such an incisive gaze compared to those of us who haven't left yet, so I'd really like to know how it happened, and particularly which benighted bureaucrat was responsible for the non-inclusive 'Team GB'?.

Nedward.

handsfree
12th Oct 2011, 13:33
Within lies your answer Nedward

Great Britain at the Olympics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain_at_the_Olympics)

Seems that the Olympic Committee designated the team representing the United Kindom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland as "Great Britain" for the 1908 Olympics and it has remained so ever since.
Northern Ireland are not impressed and want it renamed Team UK which would appear entirely reasonable to me.

er340790
12th Oct 2011, 13:58
Irked by Team GB's use of the word GREAT, The French and Italian Committees have similarly changed their team names to....

F :mad: ing Brilliant France

and

Not Bad Italy

The SSK
12th Oct 2011, 14:00
Maybe, maybe not handsfree

According to this Wiki page
Ireland at the Olympics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland_at_the_Olympics)
after Athens 2004 the British Olympic Association changed the name of the team from ‘Great Britain’ to ‘Great Britain & Northern Ireland’ – to objections from the Olympic Council of Ireland.

The Irish team, of course, is called ‘Ireland’ and not ‘Eire’ or ‘Republic of Ireland’ or ‘The Bottom Bit of the Lesser of the Two British Isles’

MagnusP
12th Oct 2011, 14:08
‘The Bottom Bit of the Lesser of the Two British Isles’

Pah! If wiki's your friend, then dwell on:

The British Isles are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe that include the islands of Great Britain and Ireland and over six thousand smaller isles.

Two British Isles indeed.... :*

The name may give you a clue to the source of the indignation. :ok:

The SSK
12th Oct 2011, 14:12
OK

Great Britain
Lesser Britain
and several assorted Rocks

MagnusP
12th Oct 2011, 14:19
Ah, but 125 of the rocks are permanently inhabited. You disenfranchise islanders! :p

Cacophonix
12th Oct 2011, 14:20
over six thousand smaller isles

Those in the north mostly inhabited by aggressive dive bombing terns, skuas and the occasional friendly whisky drinking local! ;)

Caco

G-CPTN
12th Oct 2011, 17:13
What about sweet Rockall (http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2011/jan/01/john-vidal-rockall)?

Tankertrashnav
12th Oct 2011, 21:30
Team GB annoys me too. Same argument can also be applied to the term GBP for the £sterling. Last time I looked they were still using sterling in Northern Ireland, so UKP would be a more accurate description, although I can't see what's wrong with the old term.

Mind you, I'll be giving the Olympics the same amount of attention that I'll be giving the European Football Championships.

Zilch.

A A Gruntpuddock
12th Oct 2011, 23:08
"Mind you, I'll be giving the Olympics the same amount of attention that I'll be giving the European Football Championships."

You've ended up paying for it (although it was all supposed to be privately funded) so you might as well watch it.

ExSp33db1rd
13th Oct 2011, 01:05
Mind you, I'll be giving the Olympics the same amount of attention that I'll be giving the European Football Championships."


Here ! Here !

where did that come from, does it mean me sitting over here, too ?

or should it be Hear ! Hear ! i.e. listen to me agreeing ?

Wot's the origin of the phrase ?

( I guess I can go into Wikiwotsit, just to idle - and busy )

alisoncc
13th Oct 2011, 08:20
Down here in Oz, it's most often referred to as The UK, rarely as GB. Even sterling is know as UKP's. Just some input from the colonies.