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ex_matelot
11th Oct 2011, 21:09
Seems I've got a set of these.
Anyone have any experience of successful removal?

I live in a semi-detached, double glazed etc. We use the top bedroom which is essentially the attic. If I open one of the windows so much as an inch I have a shedload of the bastards seeping in through it. Luckily they are easy to get with a hoover but it's a pain in the ass.

I've googled and seen the various pest control options, I've even looked up a local pest controller. He proudly showed a picture of his van with "pest control" written on the side. Not sure I want that seen outside my house.

Any advice welcomed.

(Have not yet asked the neighbours if they have a problem, I've only just discovered it myself).

Parapunter
11th Oct 2011, 21:13
1) Dig up patio.

2) Remove corpse from attic.

3) Bury body under patio.

4) Re-lay patio

5) Wait for sun to come up, have a cuppa. Don't tell anyone.

con-pilot
11th Oct 2011, 21:22
Uh, put a wire screen on the outside of the window. Works here.

Checkboard
11th Oct 2011, 21:34
Insect screens on windows offer no protection from the flies because they crawl in the home through small openings in the walls of the building. These same overwintering flies get into rooms during the winter and spring months entering through window pulley holes, around the baseboards and through other small openings in walls.

Treatment:
As these type of flies tend to overwinter in roof-spaces, a good treatment is to release insecticidal smoke generators into the roof space. As the smoke settles a very thin film of insecticidal dust covers all the surfaces and when the fly cleans itself it ingests the insecticide and dies.
Cluster Fly (http://www.the-piedpiper.co.uk/th6e.htm)

con-pilot
11th Oct 2011, 21:48
Well, you lot must have a lot smaller flies there than we do here and I sure don't remember seeing such small flies when I lived in England.

We are talking about England, are we not?

Standard wire screens in the US keep out any thing that you can see with the naked eye. Like flies.

Also, I've never lived in a home in the US where there were "small openings in the walls of the building." to where flies could crawl in through. Come to think of it, I don't recall living in such a building in England either.

Must have missed that. Besides that, the original poster of this thread wrote, and I quote; "If I open one of the windows so much as an inch I have a shedload of the bastards seeping in through it".

Nothing was said about holes in the walls.

So, install a small wire mesh screen outside of the window.

Parapunter
11th Oct 2011, 21:49
Well, that's that put to bed then.

con-pilot
11th Oct 2011, 21:58
Well, that's that put to bed then.

You got flies in your bed? :eek:


:p

ZH875
11th Oct 2011, 22:12
Also, I've never lived in a home in the US where there were "small openings in the walls of the building." to where flies could crawl in through. Come to think of it, I don't recall living in such a building in England either.
So, install a small wire mesh screen outside of the window.

Weep Holes are prevalent in new build houses, the little buggers can get in through them into the wall cavities, also the eaves are often open to the outside world, so they get in there as well.

A regular dose of Raid, or some even more flytoxic smoke bomb does the trick at my hovel. Or wait until it is a cold morning and let Mr Dyson have a few.

con-pilot
11th Oct 2011, 22:19
Well, tell ya what, we'll just write this off on just things being different, in different places. We have 'weep holes' in our homes as well, but covered with screens.

Not better or worse, nor right versus wrong, just different.

Cheers. :ok:

G-CPTN
11th Oct 2011, 22:25
the eaves are often open to the outside world,In 1977 we moved to a house that was 'dry-lined' (plaster-board rather than skimmed) inside. It was also a 'chalet-bungalow' (the eaves were between the floors with the upstairs bedrooms as 'dormers').

When the wind blew (and the location was such that the wind funnelled between the neighbouring properties) it whistled between the inner wall and the plasterboard, thus cooling the whole downstairs.

The previous occupants had had the wall-cavity filled with foam, but this was ineffective as it only blocked the gap between the outer and inner brickwork - not the gap between the inner wall and the plasterboard. Removing an electrical socket released a howling gale of cold air into the room.

And then there were the mice . . .

Flies would have had no problem in getting in!

(God, how I hated that house!)

stuckgear
12th Oct 2011, 08:08
con, fly screens in the UK are about as alien as PG Tips in the US !

using the expression "she bangs like a screen door in a hurricane" gets blank looks here :ok:

OFSO
12th Oct 2011, 10:47
"small openings in the walls of the building."

Houses in Spain (Germany too for that matter) have exterior roller shutters over the windows which are lowered (and pulled up too, for that matter) from inside by straps entering the house through "small openings". These usually have a draught-excluder of some sort, but it's never entirely insect-proof.

Pest of The Year 2011 has been (once again) the ant, columns of which enter the house and make their way to desirable places such as the kitchen. Not many spiders this year, though. Probably put off by the ants.

Note for G-CPTN: ants love that sprayed-in-place foam insulation. They burrow into it and make nests in it, between double walls and where it's been used to hold new glazing in place. Our builder here won't use it, good old cement and mortar for him when installing windows and doors.

cargosales
12th Oct 2011, 10:55
There's some good advice in this article http://www.pestmagazine.co.uk/_attachments/Resources/160_S4.pdf

CS

vulcanised
12th Oct 2011, 11:52
Strange that screen doors have never taken off in the UK.

I've thought that one would be useful at my back door but the DIY sheds don't offer anything and you have to Google for the material and then make your own door.

It would be handy to be able to have the ventilation on a hot day without the problem of various cats wandering in.

er340790
12th Oct 2011, 13:06
Ah, we get those buggers at the cottage in the open loft area. Glad we are not alone.

A regular dose of Raid

I zap the areas they like (warm, south-facing window areas are their favourite) every time we leave. Seems to solve it. Not sure it's a good idea to do it while you're in the building though.

rgbrock1
12th Oct 2011, 13:23
Cluster flies? I would imagine the best way of ridding one's abode of cluster flies is by engaging the same with cluster bombs. No?

denachtenmai
12th Oct 2011, 15:44
Dunbar said that McWatt had flies in his eyes :hmm:

aviate1138
13th Oct 2011, 09:09
Years ago when working for Film Director Stanley Kubrick I noticed his house in Boreham Wood had incredibly fine wire mesh covering every window opening. I was told by his PA that he had an entomologist send data on the smallest flying insect that existed in the UK and his mesh was fine enough to keep the bugs out!

RIP Stanley - the bugs got you in the end!