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er340790
5th Oct 2011, 20:54
Suspect this dish probably beats the ones that used to kill me in Bradford back in my student days.

BBC News - Pair in hospital after Kismot 'killer' curry contest (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-15183070)

Ironically, most of the dishes I had while working in India years later were pretty mild in comparison. Biggest danger to ones guts there was from improperly cooked steaks.

What was the spiciest dish you've ever had???????

SpringHeeledJack
5th Oct 2011, 21:30
I've never really understood the fascination with eating REALLY hot spicy foods, because after a few bites you can't taste that which you were hoping to enjoy. Sure, a group of boozed up blokes in an Indian restaurant after the pub are always going to go for the macho option to see who can be more manly than their cohorts, but in reality ? I've made a few bad choices in various cuisines over the years and have paid the price, remember it always burns twice :E

Last week I decided to garnish a cornish pasty with some salsa that was given to me by an emigrating friend as part of his larder. I only read 'salsa' on the jar and not the rest "Dave's insanely hot salsa". Within 2 minutes, after munching half the pasty I was in so much distress that I could eat no more and spent the next 2hrs gargling milk and cursing loudly at my stupidity.....:ugh:


SHJ

TURIN
5th Oct 2011, 23:10
Is that the one with the caution on the back of the bottle stating that it's good for soups, stews, curries & removing yacht varnish? :ouch:

11Fan
5th Oct 2011, 23:12
"I have learned my lesson and will never do it again and, in fact, I will be cutting down on my spice intake full stop."

It could have been wurst.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3012/3077893814_f8fc2db710.jpg

Matari
5th Oct 2011, 23:27
11Fan, that looks pretty good!

hellsbrink
6th Oct 2011, 00:02
I've never really understood the fascination with eating REALLY hot spicy foods, because after a few bites you can't taste that which you were hoping to enjoy. Sure, a group of boozed up blokes in an Indian restaurant after the pub are always going to go for the macho option to see who can be more manly than their cohorts, but in reality ? I've made a few bad choices in various cuisines over the years and have paid the price, remember it always burns twice

Well, first you have to understand the mechanism that makes your normal person eat hotter and hotter curries/chilli.

When you munch on the spicy stuff, the capsaicin binds to the pain receptors in the mouth and throat that are responsible for sensing "heat" (as in fire type heat, not spicy food heat) and burning and that sends a message to the brain that says you have been injured in some way.

So your brain does what it normally does. Your body gets flooded with adrenaline, your heart rate goes up and your body is also flooded with endorphins. That mix gives you the effect of a mild opium hit, and that is why some enjoy eating the hottest curry or chilli they can get, no matter whether they taste it properly or not, because that "hit" is addictive and that means that the Kormas these people used to eat do not produce the same effect and, as the years go on and they go up the scale of curry heat, they find that the Vindaloo isn't hot enough to get that "kick" because they have been desensitised to the "burn". So, inevitably, end up happily munching on the most vicious arse burner that is on sale, or make their own (like my "2-step Mushroom Cloud Chilli").

alisoncc
6th Oct 2011, 00:57
Quite a few years back saw this brilliant documentary about curry. Most interesting aspect raised was that hot curries were NOT Indian. Curry, as such, was orginally a mix of spices used by the Brits in India during the Raj days to disguise the taste of meat that was off due to no refrigeration. The hotter the curry the more off the meat. Given the cats, dogs and other animals that go into curries these days probably still fills a similar function.

Pinky the pilot
6th Oct 2011, 04:38
Shared a flat in Port Moresby years ago with a fellow company Pilot who was Indian. Did us a curry one Saturday night when we had decided not to head out to the Club Dero. (Aero Club:E)

I remember it as being very tasty, somewhat spicy but not really hot.:ok:
He stated quite firmly that a good curry is not hot but spicy!

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2011, 06:35
"first you have to understand the mechanism that makes your normal person eat hotter and hotter curries/chilli."

Otherwise summated as...... being daft as a brush....:ugh:

11Fan....thanks for that nostalgic photo of heaven on a plate....the only item missing was the mayo...:ok:

Solid Rust Twotter
6th Oct 2011, 07:03
Agreed, the good ones are not necessarily hot but rather tasty and spicy. One must confess to having a penchant for the hotter foods and can shovel in the peri peri like a good 'un, particularly on prego rolls. Got one out here by name Bushman's Revenge from the Bushmans Chili company in Cape Town. One finds it quite pleasant, despite the warning label informing one that it's not a good idea to get it on your skin. Apparently it's OK to douse your tonsils in it though....:}

Capetonian
6th Oct 2011, 07:05
I once shared a flat with a guy who was obsessed with making and eating curries as hot as possible. He achieved this by putting in as much chili in various forms as possible, making the curries inedibly hot and also cancelling out the taste and pleasure of any of the other ingredients. His curries were frankly vile and he always wondered why people never came back for more!

I thanked my lucky stars that we did not share a bathroom or toilet! It was bad enough walking past his bedroom in the morning with the door closed. He often wondered why he was not succesful with the opposite sex!

We lost touch a while ago. Pete, I wonder if you're out there somewhere and read this. If you are PM me.

Then there was Alex, who bragged constantly that nobody could make a curry hot enough for him. We took him to a place in Durban and I set up the chef to make the hottest curry in history and set it down in front of Alex. He turned white and suddenly decided he didn't really feel hungry ...... wimp!

timgill
6th Oct 2011, 07:20
Mrs tg and I took our parents out for one after we'd got engaged. The fathers were trying to outdo each other with tasteless and often racist "jokes" about Indians, so I ordered them a Bangalore Phal Prawn each. That soon shut them up, especially when they downed their lagers in desperation. I trust you all know this is the worst thing you can do if you get hit by a hot one...

BombayDuck
6th Oct 2011, 08:19
This thread makes me happy. The British concept of Indian food revolves around "curry", which is not really the case back home. Even the Vindaloo back home does not have to be burn-your-tongue spicy; it's a Portuguese-sourced dish that involved wine vinegar and coconut milk as its central ingredients.

I get a bit annoyed when Brits I know go "Oh, Indian food is so spicy!" - Er, no, it isn't. You probably haven't seen a tenth of the variety that is actually "Indian" and most of it has been cooked for you by Bangladeshi immigrants who would not be able to find Goa, Gujarat or Kerala on a map.

Bangalore Phal Prawn

See, this is what I mean. Tell this to any Indian who is not familiar with British cuisine and they'll go :confused: :confused: :confused: "Bombay" potatoes, "Madras" curry, "Bangalore" Phal... all British inventions! :)

Solid Rust Twotter
6th Oct 2011, 08:27
A good mate and myself, aled up to the eyeballs one morning around 2am, decided to make something to eat. We got a curry going and after a bit of tasting, decided it wasn't hot enough and required something special. We gave it the usual dash around the spice rack but that still wasn't quite enough so we decided to let it have a good shot of pepper spray (oleoresin capsicum) which, strangely enough, is a food additive. Still not right so we gave it a few more shots of a full strength insecticide. Still not quite what we wanted but some small Darwinian bit of the hindbrain was yelling at us that using insecticide was now becoming a little silly, so we ate it as it was. Pretty good as it turned out, with no ill effects, but once we'd cleared the ale from the logic centres we figured a repeat performance was not on the cards.

HKPAX
6th Oct 2011, 12:05
I spice up a tin of red salmon with a few crushed chillis - the small ones - and a few slivers of garlic, left in fridge for a few minutes to infuse. Very tasty, and what Hellsbrink says makes sense to me. Also good for suppressing homo-erotic thoughts. If handling chillis with your fingers, wash very carefully after.

MagnusP
6th Oct 2011, 12:10
HKPAX: should that not have been "auto-erotic"?

HKPAX
6th Oct 2011, 12:12
er...it teaches you what your a**eh**e is for

MagnusP
6th Oct 2011, 12:29
Ah, got you, ta. The practice of autoeroticism is probably also not recommended immediately after handling chillies. :ooh:

TURIN
6th Oct 2011, 12:53
Ah, got you, ta. The practice of autoeroticism is probably also not recommended immediately after handling chillies.

For all the good it does you, you may as well stick yer finger up yer a***! :eek:

ShyTorque
6th Oct 2011, 12:54
What was the spiciest dish you've ever had???????

The second chilli my (new) wife made for me. The first time she followed the book recipe to the letter. The second time she thought she could remember it but unfortunately she got it very wrong and put in tablespoons of chilli powder rather than teaspoons.

We ate the lot, me out of politeness and she out of not wanting to admit she'd made a mistake. We both regretted it for days afterwards. :p

Al Fakhem
6th Oct 2011, 13:05
I get a bit annoyed when Brits I know go "Oh, Indian food is so spicy!" - Er, no, it isn't. You probably haven't seen a tenth of the variety that is actually "Indian" and most of it has been cooked for you by Bangladeshi immigrants who would not be able to find Goa, Gujarat or Kerala on a map.

With you on that one, BD.

We always test any Indian restaurant in the UK by asking for Reshmi Kebab or Dal Makhani or something like that, if it's not on the menu. If they don't know what we're taking about, it's time to go.

Slasher
6th Oct 2011, 13:46
Had my fair share of dodgy vindaloos (especially in India)
and found that real Indians living elsewhere can cook up an
absolute miracle, assuming they live in places where they
have access to the required proper ingredients.

BombayDuck
6th Oct 2011, 13:53
Slasher, not surprised if you didn't get the best food, especially if you ended up trying them in tourist traps. The best Vindaloos don't need to be made in Goa, but are best made by Goan "Kattlick" (Catholic) families and the kinds where the meat has been marinated all night long.

Al Fakhem: Reshmi Kabab? Sigh. Now I'm hungry.

sitigeltfel
6th Oct 2011, 13:58
er...it teaches you what your a**eh**e is for

We used to call the fiery curries "ringburners". :eek:

Slasher
6th Oct 2011, 14:20
http://www.picamatic.com/show/2011/10/06/05/20/7924591_365x500.jpg

radeng
6th Oct 2011, 15:10
There's an Indian restaurant in a San Diego suburb that offer a Vindaloo at lunch time. I don't belief it's ever had an curry ingredients in it, let alone any chilis.

My last chili con carne went wrong somewhere, being slightly hot but missing the other flavours expected from cinnamon, cloves, marjoram, oregano, coriander, sesame seed, garlic, onion, and chili powder. Disappointing.

Rossian
6th Oct 2011, 15:36
I suspect there were just toooooo many competing herbs and spices all in the one space.

Remember the blessed Elizabeth David's mantra "keep it simple;" that does NOT mean CRUDE OR COARSE.

The Ancient Mariner

flying lid
6th Oct 2011, 19:08
"Sweaty Betty's" Indian restraunt (!!?!!) was THE place to go in Wigan the 80's. Speciallity was the "Twice Hot Vindaloo" - too hot for me though, Rogan Josh was my favourite.

Betty was a larger than life white (sometimes !!) "lady" who's husband, Ron, a very dark skinned Indian who did the cooking. Betty herself did the seating, order taking, meal delivery, payment & bouncing out as neccesary .

A laugh a minute on Friday nights. No trouble there - you DID NOT mess around with her.

Wigan Messageboard :: wiganworld (http://wiganworld.com/communicate/mb_message.php?opt=f2&opt2=&msd=21694&offset=1240&subject=Sweaty%20Bettys)

Gone off Indian food of late since discovering Thai food. Far more tasty.

Lid

con-pilot
6th Oct 2011, 19:59
Gone off Indian food of late since discovering Thai food. Far more tasty.



Same here, back when I was flying I'd pick hotels based on how close Thai restaurants were located to them. :p

con-pilot
6th Oct 2011, 20:08
The two hottest meals I've had, that I could not finish was one at an Italian restaurant in London, yes London, and in a noodle shop in Hong Kong. In Hong Kong I should have know better and was warned, but tried to eat it any way, a loss of face thing. In London, I'm convinced either someone in the kitchen made a mistake, or one of the people I was with played a practical joke on me, but never admitted such. It was supposed to be a spicy seafood pasta dish, it was pure fire in my mouth.

Oh, I can eat fresh jalapeņo peppers with no problems, but that dish in London dang near killed me. :uhoh:

radeng
6th Oct 2011, 20:40
Rossian,

the recipe usually works and produces a marvellous chili with a fruity overtone that has proved popular with US colleagues when I've cooked it over there.

From Sainsbury's Mexican cookbook!

EDDNHopper
6th Oct 2011, 21:12
"Sweaty Betty's" Indian restraunt (!!?!!) was THE place to go in Wigan the 80's.

That must have been shortly before my time in Wigan in then, i.e. before 19.. erm, 1982/83. There were quite a few Indian restaurants along Market St. then, wasn't that where Bluto's was, too?

One of the hottest sauces I ever had was a Malawi chili sauce. Had a deceptive "so mild, even babies can take it" written on the label... :ooh:

flying lid
6th Oct 2011, 22:36
EDDN - Indeed "Sweaty Bettys" (The Koi i Noor if I remember) was originally on Darlington St, alongside "Mucky Mary's army surplus stores, in front of the Gas works (!!), but moved in the early 80's to Market St, 100 or so yards down from Bluto's.

Bluto's was a fantastic pub, on 3 or 4 levels, live bands, good beer, great atmosphere. Closed many years ago, now a bloody bank.

If you remember the old (rough) Market hotel, that is now a rather posh & very nice Thai restaurant & bar.

Lid

Carry0nLuggage
7th Oct 2011, 10:32
The hottest, most uncomfortable, curry must have been the "Goan Hoat and Sour" I had in the wardroom of HMS Juno when I was aboard for a few days once. The second was a chilli in a Tex-Mex restaurant in Preston in the Nineties. I didn't feel unwell after that one, just very, very, odd for a day or so.

The only way to eat those two was to catch the solids and as much sauce as possible in one's teeth and then flick it down the throat. Letting any of it touch the inside of the mouth was not a good idea :uhoh:

Visiting India was a revelation. Very little heat but so much flavour! I think I was the only one to put on weight while working there. :ok:

parabellum
7th Oct 2011, 12:00
Probably hasn't changed much, if you want a hot curry in London then you can go to Brick Lane, it will probably be made by a Bangladeshi, if you want a genuine selection of Indian food, including curry, then try the Bombay Brasserie opposite Cromwell Road tube station.

Ancient Observer
7th Oct 2011, 12:06
Aaahh! Memories of "Ring Sting".

Tankertrashnav
7th Oct 2011, 13:06
Whenever I hear a lot of boasting about whats the hottest curry you've ever eaten I always think about this:

Going For An English - YouTube

"What's the blandest thing you've got on the menu?" :D

BombayDuck
7th Oct 2011, 13:14
Thank you, TTN, ever since G-CPTN first linked it, its been my favourite sketch from the series! :D

Solid Rust Twotter
7th Oct 2011, 13:50
This one, Mr Hopper? The motto has changed to Abale Samalani - "Friends take care"...:E

It's pretty good stuff, though. Excellent on chicken and bacon sandwiches.

Peri-peri sauce | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/theonecampaign/5143952788/lightbox/)

Alloa Akbar
7th Oct 2011, 14:10
My local in Stone serves up a "Naga Chilli Curry".. Hmmm authentic indian curry based on the Dorset Naga?? Hot as you like though, and as one who does enjoy the toasted tonsils approach, i measure a good one by the rich after taste.. :ok:

flyblue
7th Oct 2011, 21:16
I mentioned in another thread that I have a Thai friend. Whenever I go to BKK, he takes me to the best, "real" Thai restaurant where "real" Thais eat...meaning very hot, the way we like it! :O

I should have warned a colleague who was with me on a BKK flight and that we invitred to come along one night about this last detail though...he could have avoided spending the whole return flight in the lavatories, clutching a fast emptying pack of baby wipes...:E

G-CPTN
7th Oct 2011, 22:33
I heard of an unfortunate man who, having partaken of an exceptionally hot and spicy curry, sought comfort from what he thought were 'baby-wipes' but which turned out to be bleach-wipes . . .

BombayDuck
8th Oct 2011, 00:35
Now you know why they use water in the subcontinent...

Rush2112
8th Oct 2011, 08:13
When we first moved to Bangkok in early 2002, there was a cheap and cheerful Thai restaurant in Soi Convent called "Prik Kee Noo". Prik Kee Noo means "mouse sh!t chili" referring to the smallest and fiercest chilies.

Mrs R is Indonesian and was well used to spicy food, and I had lived four years in Jakarta, plus I'm English and curry is our national dish, right? So I can take spicy as well. So I thought.

We ordered the house special, Prik Kee Noo chicken curry.

There were more bird's eye chilies in there than chicken.

After one mouthful, my lips were on fire, and my eyes were watering.

Mrs R gave up. I soldiered on and finished most of it, but had to give up as well in the end.

Next day my ring was in tatters.

We used to back to Prik Kee Noo quite often, until one sad day it closed, but we never, ever had the PKN curry again.

EDDNHopper
9th Oct 2011, 14:02
Could indeed be the very one, Mr Twotter! It was ages ago but "Nali" sounds familiar.

Yes, Lid, I remember Bluto's not for its hot dishes but maybe because that was where some of the hottest girls in town met... :E

So I have taken down the "Bombay Brasserie" in London as a place worth visiting. Any other suggestions?