PDA

View Full Version : So what's all this I hear about French speeding punishment?


Loose rivets
14th Sep 2011, 00:10
Pal told me tonight, that the camara warning signs were going and E6,000 fines were going to be imposed for limit + dunno, think it was over 30. ALSO THEY TAKE YOUR CAR.

Stories of cops being seen by car's owners driving their old cars. Stories of folk buying their cars back at auction.

This particular guy has a home in the south of France and a collection of exotic cars back in Essex. He loved driving there, but now it sounds as though it's going to be a nightmare.

Didn't policing start out as 'Policing by consent?' I never consented to being robbed of my car.

ChrisVJ
14th Sep 2011, 08:09
Provincial government here are trying the on.

Half a dozen young (immigrant) hooligans caught speeding somewhat, (well, a whole lot actually) all driving Italian fast pistons, eg, Ferrari, Lamborghini, etc. Cars held for a week and kids told to cab it home. Next thing you know the local prosecutors trying to retain the cars under the "Proceeds of crime bill."

Written by the usual bunch of "include everything we can think of" civil servants the law includes "used in the commission of a crime" but I suspect the approving public didn't expect to lose their cars for illegal parking, which is probably next.

In the same vein a lady in West Van is currently at risk of losing her house. She imported (with appropriate visas) a house cleaner from Africa somewhere but underpaid and overworked her. The prosecutors tried to do her for "slavery," however they don't appear to be able to make it stick. In the meantime they have issued proceedings for confiscation of the house as "used in the committing of a crime" even though the crime has not been established.

The point is she doesn't have to be found guilty of the crime (and nor do the bad assed speeders) as the confiscation proceedings are CIVIL and subject to "The balance of probabilities" rather than the proof required in criminal court. You could be found innocent and still lose your property.

Any one else think this is a bit over the top?

Tankertrashnav
14th Sep 2011, 09:33
I guess in principle I agree with you, but I only have a limited supply of sympathy, and once I've expended it on people who have had a really raw deal out of life, I dont have much left for a bunch of spoilt kids burning rubber or a rich bitch who thinks its ok to exploit and underpay a poor immigrant so that she doesn't have to do her own housework.

Schadenfreude may be an unworthy emotion, but it's one I'll admit to in these cases.

wiggy
14th Sep 2011, 09:46
Back to the OP: It's a long and ongoing story, and I'm not sure where it's got to legislature wise, but yes AFAIK , there are plans to remove the signs warning of fixed cameras, and yes, the flics can confiscate your car if you're grossly over the limit.

However doing 30+km/h over the limit was always a big "no, no" in France, even under the previous legislation you could end up walking home with your car impounded if pulled over for speeding, and the mobile speed traps (and there were lots of those) were never signed, so I don't think the changes are any big deal for the majority of motorists. It's only going to be a "nightmare" for those who want to blast up the Autoroute at 160 km plus.

This was in Le Figaro last May.

Le Figaro - France : Les radars ne seront plus signals sur les routes (http://www.lefigaro.fr/actualite-france/2011/05/11/01016-20110511ARTFIG00522-les-radars-ne-seront-plus-signales-sur-les-routes.php)

Capetonian
14th Sep 2011, 09:46
People should be allowed to risk, exploit, abuse and destroy their own lives and bodies as they wish but then they must not expect protection or sympathy. When the risk extends to innocent parties it becomes an entirely different matter and should be punished severely.

blue up
14th Sep 2011, 10:16
Does this include ATC? Heck. I might even keep 160 knots to 4 miles, next time.

OFSO
14th Sep 2011, 10:20
Acquaintance here across the border in France doesn't actually pull to a dead stop at a T-Junction miles from anywhere, as he rolls across the white line at 0.0000001 metres per second, les Flics spring out of nowhere, fine him a vast amount of money and confiscated his (English) driving licence. I said that I thought the amount of the fine was enormous and he confessed that possibly calling the leading cop a "F*cking French Adolf Hitler" might have had something to do with it.

But have noticed how irritatingly slowly French drive when down here in N. Spain and wondered why they all appear to be so careful these days.

ross_M
14th Sep 2011, 10:37
However doing 30+km/h over the limit was always a big "no, no" in France,

Interestingly that's just 18 miles-per-hr over the limit. Around a $500 fine in most American states. Sucks being french, I guess.

Ali Qadoo
14th Sep 2011, 10:54
The plan to remove roadsigns warning of radar traps got quietly binned a few months ago, and those that had been taken down have been replaced. I also got pulled for not coming to a dead halt at a stop sign but escaped with nothing worse than a telling-off. Just as in any country, if you upset the local plods, the French ones can and will make your life a misery.... think there's a lesson there somewhere.

wiggy
14th Sep 2011, 11:01
I also got pulled for not coming to a dead halt at a stop sign

One of their favourite's, isn't it :sad:

BTW have I told you about the wife's speeding fine ( for doing 58 km/h in a 50...) :E :E

Ali Qadoo
14th Sep 2011, 11:05
Spooky coincidence, Wiggy. The shapely, pouting Mrs Q got zapped by a camera fitted to an unmarked blue Peugot parked by the roadside. Eighty-odd EUR for doing 59 kph in a 50 limit - a bit galling (pun intended) when you see how most of the locals here drive.

Parapunter
14th Sep 2011, 11:08
Interestingly that's just 18 miles-per-hr over the limit. Around a $500 fine in most American states. Sucks being french, I guess. That's around £230. Here in the UK, that would get you £60. Sucks being American too.

wiggy
14th Sep 2011, 11:20
It might suck here in Euroland, but at least you can legally do 70 mph on most UK Motorways, and 130 km/h, aka 80 mph on most French Autoroutes. Remind me again of the speed limit on most of the major Highways in the States.

Lon More
14th Sep 2011, 11:32
if you upset the local plods, the French ones can and will make your life a misery....

The ones on Motorbikes used to be known as "Les vaches qui roullent" (a poke at the laughing cow cheese and also the amount of leather needed to cover each cop) Never found them very friendly but if you want miserable try le Gendarmerie de l'Air - they can really mess your day up.

BTW €80 for 10kph over the limit seems common in Belgium too; best was €240 for just under 150 on the Motorway:sad: - lot of beer and pizzas that was.

Storminnorm
14th Sep 2011, 11:49
Had to pay £80 for a "Speed Awareness" course after
being clocked doing 60 in a 50 limit area in Cornwall.

That was a couple of months ago. I'm still upset about it!!!

At least I didn't get any "Points" on the license.

mixture
14th Sep 2011, 12:00
People should be allowed to risk, exploit, abuse and destroy their own lives and bodies as they wish but then they must not expect protection or sympathy.

A polite way of saying "do the crime, pay the fine".

I'm afraid I've no sympathy for speeders. It's really not that difficult to maintain your vehicle at or below the speed limit.

If you want to exceed it,then fine, but don't come whinging for tea, biscuits and sympathy when you get caught out.

You've got a great big speedo in front of your nose, and the majority of experienced drivers should be able to reasonably judge their speed pretty accurately by visual reference to how fast the world outside is moving.

Tankertrashnav
14th Sep 2011, 12:40
When I got arrested for shoplifting recently, I thought it was pretty rough - after all it was only a couple of bars of chocolate and Tescos can afford that, can't they? I really think I've been hard done by and I'm still smarting about the subsequent fine and the criminal record. Can't someone invent a store detective detector that would enable would-be shoplifters to evade being caught, rather along the lines of those radar detectors you can buy for cars?...





...actually the above is a total fiction, but I wonder why it would be shocking for a contributor on here to admit to being a petty thief, but consistent breaking of the speed limits is almost a badge of honour worn by some motorists. Have to agree with mixture on this one.

MagnusP
14th Sep 2011, 12:47
TTN: the difference is that nicking chocolate is depriving someone else of their property. Speeding isn't.

mixture
14th Sep 2011, 12:59
Speeding isn't.

It's not depriving the government of their property, yes. But it is against Road Traffic legislation.

AlpineSkier
14th Sep 2011, 13:17
@ Wiggy

Here's a quote from today's Le Dauphine Libere which you may be familiar with.

En effet le “grand excès de vitesse” (plus de 50 km/h au-dessus de la vitesse autorisée) est un délit, passible d’une amende de 1 500 € et d’une suspension de permis allant jusqu’à trois ans. C’est beaucoup plus cher en cas de récidive, avec de la prison ferme possible.

So the big step is 50 kph over the posted limit ( up to E 1500 fine and loss of licence for 3 years with prison possible for repeat offence.) that's when they take your licence on the spot and you start walking unless you have another qualified driver in the car.

Usual fine is 800 - 1,000 Euros and six months loss of licence. They can confiscate your car/motorbike but think this has to be ordered by a court as there isn't another "trip-wire" above the 50 plus one .

The French are taking road-safety far more seriously, fines are high and checks frequent, particularly at holiday-times.

Sarkozy back-pedalled on the radar-check warning signs and saved face by replacing them ( over a period of time) with radars educatifs which are the signs which flash up your speed as you approach.

ShyTorque
14th Sep 2011, 13:17
It's a shame that "driving without due care and attention" or "failing to make normal progress" aren't pursued more strongly.

E.g. driving at 30 mph in a 60 limit with a line of cars half a mile long behind is one instance I can think of.

But then that would involve having police actually out on the roads, looking at the real problems caused by poor drivers. :hmm:

MagnusP
14th Sep 2011, 14:08
Agreed, mixture, it's in breach of the Road Traffic Act, or associated bye-laws. However, speeding per se is victimless unless it contributes to damage or injury, in which case it should be regarded as an aggravating factor in civil or criminal cases. The current 70mph limit in the UK was introduced in response to the 1973 oil crisis, in order to reduce oil demand. Why is it still illegal?

Buggery, cunnilingus and fellatio have all been illegal over the years. I assume you're a law-abiding citizen there, too. :ok:

Storminnorm
14th Sep 2011, 14:22
I must say that I DO regret having done 60 mph on an
empty, three lane road that had a 50 mph limit.
I am really ashamed of my rash behaviour.
If we all indulged in that sort of rash action Anarchy would
rule, and society would collapse.

SO SORRY.

Fellatio?? Illegal??

MagnusP
14th Sep 2011, 14:35
Yep, Norm, especially in several US states under sodomy laws, for some reason.

Checkboard
14th Sep 2011, 14:54
The current 70mph limit in the UK was introduced in response to the 1973 oil crisis, in order to reduce oil demand. Why is it still illegal?
According to BBC's Top Gear, and the quote below, the M1 (first section opened in 1959) was originally an open speed limit, just as the autobahns in Germany. When an AC Cobra hit 180 mph, though (in a test drive - nice bit of new tarmac :ok:) the limit was introduced.

Q: When was the 70 mph motorway speed limit introduced in Britain?

A: The 70 mph National Speed Limit was introduced as a temporary measure in December 1965. It is often blamed on Barbara Castle, but at the time the Minister of Transport was Tom Fraser.

The reason given was a spate of serious accidents in foggy conditions, but it is often claimed that the MoT had been alarmed by AC Cars testing their latest Cobra on the M1 at speeds up to 180 mph.

It was confirmed as a permanent limit in 1967, by which time Barbara Castle (a non-driver) had become Minister of Transport.There was surprisingly little debate at the time: the fact that the average family car of the time could only just exceed 70 mph perhaps had something to do with this.

It should be noted that this limit applied to all previously "derestricted" roads, not only motorways.

All rural roads in the Isle of Man (including most of the famous TT course) remain genuinely derestricted, as a matter of interest.

11Fan
14th Sep 2011, 15:14
Para.......Fellatio?? Illegal??

norm......Yep, Norm, especially in several US states under sodomy laws, for some reason.

Magnus..Sucks being American too.

MagnusP
14th Sep 2011, 15:20
I love the way JB drifts from speed enforcement in France to nookie in a few short posts. I think MrsP and I will continue to commit criminal offences anyway, both behind the wheel and under the duvet! :p

42psi
14th Sep 2011, 15:29
Quote:
Originally Posted by MagnusP
The current 70mph limit in the UK was introduced in response to the 1973 oil crisis, in order to reduce oil demand. Why is it still illegal?



Suspect that's really a reference to the change of limit on single carriageway roads which took place at the time.

Prior to the oil crisis the limit in the UK for single carriageway roads was 70 mph (same as motorways).

During the oil crisis a temporary 50 mph limit was imposed to save fuel.

Afterwards instead of removing this it was simply increased to 60 mph and left.



What I'd like to understand is why some folks drive at 40mph regardless of the limit ... they go at 40 in a 30 ..... and then stay at 40 in a 50 ....... and again stay at 40 in a 60 ..... :confused:

Storminnorm
14th Sep 2011, 15:33
Thank goodness I was born British.

vulcanised
14th Sep 2011, 15:34
Probably don't know how to use the cruise control?

MagnusP
14th Sep 2011, 15:46
My bad regarding introduction of 70mph. It's just a guideline, anyway, isn't it?

Storminnorm
14th Sep 2011, 15:48
Nothing to do with that.
It's an AGE/SPEED ratio.
The younger you are, the faster you like to go.
At MY age i just enjoy slowing everyone else down.
Especially the youngsters.

Lon More
14th Sep 2011, 15:52
in several US states under sodomy laws, for some reason has somebody got hold of the wrong end of a stick?

onetrack
14th Sep 2011, 16:22
I think that anyone who is addicted to the drug of speed... and who has been convicted of the use and abuse thereof... should be obliged to read the following essay... an essay on the dark links between the automobile, war, aggression, "manliness", and fatalism. Aeroplanes are in the mix, too, you know... :suspect:
We who are alive, have no concept of the society that existed before the "age of speed". :ooh:

The Dark Side of Automobilism (http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/uploads/docs/240238.pdf)

Capetonian
14th Sep 2011, 16:55
TTN: the difference is that nicking chocolate is depriving someone else of their property. Speeding isn't.

No, but in a worst case scenario it could deprive someone of their life or mobility, and that is why there are speed limits. Unfortunately they are not uniformly or logically applied. I was fined for doing 35 kph past a school where there was a 20 kph limit. The fact that it was a long straight piece of road and at 2am on a Sunday morning and there was nobody around, let alone schoolkids, was irrelevant.

Squawk7777
14th Sep 2011, 17:06
I am surprised no one mentioned what (used to?) happen(s) in the Netherlands when you are (or were) caught speeding: Say tot ziens to your car.

The irony about the whole speeding issue: The Dutch police would pass you on the motorway in convertible Porsche 911 completely oblivious to the 120 or 130 km/h speed limit. Not sure if things have changed since I last drove on the A2 to Schiphol ... :bored:

con-pilot
14th Sep 2011, 17:09
Most interstate highways in the US, in non-built up areas, the speed limit is 65-70-75 mph depending on the State one is driving in. Ninety nine percent of the time you can drive nine (9) miles an hour over the speed limit and the cops will not even look at you.

Ten to fifteen miles an hour over and if the highway patrolman/woman is in a good mood and your very nice to them, you'll most likely just get a warning if the traffic is light. However, anything over that, it's going to cost you. Again, how much depends on the State you're in. The most I ever read about was $2,500.00, but the driver was doing 200 mph in a 70 mph zone.

But I've never heard of a vehicle being impounded just for speeding. Not saying that has never happened here in the US, but I've never heard of such.

A lot of our state roads in rural areas in Oklahoma have speed limits of 70 mph. But, one needs to be more careful on local roads, sometimes the local county Sheriff's Departments are not so tolerant about people going over the speed limit by just one or two miles an hour.


Just did some checking, the highest fines for speeding in the world is in, of all places, Finland, $200,000.00 USD or more for exceeding the speed limit by over 25mph. Remind me to always take a taxi when I'm in Finland. :p

Squawk7777
14th Sep 2011, 17:26
Remind me to always take a taxi when I'm in Finland.

Or you could just stick to the speed limit ;)

Lon More
14th Sep 2011, 17:42
I am surprised no one mentioned what (used to?) happen(s) in the Netherlands when you are (or were) caught speeding: Say tot ziens to your car.
Can't remember ever hearing of that in 40+ years of hammer down motoring here. What they will do is take your driving licence away if doing 50% or more over the limit. No discussion possible. Decision whether or not to give it back is taken by the Officier van Jistutie,

sitigeltfel
14th Sep 2011, 17:54
I picked up a fine for speeding between Bordeaux and Narbonne a few weeks ago, apparently I was doing 97kph in a 90 zone. As I was less than 20kph over the limit, the fine is...

45 euros if paid within fifteen days.
68 euros if paid after the fifteen days.
180 euros if I contest it, and lose.

To save hassle I will just cough up. :(

I have also been breathalysed twice in the last six months and had one other stop to check papers. Speaking to French friends, this is not unusual. I don't argue, they have big guns here.

hellsbrink
14th Sep 2011, 18:57
Just back from a run down to Paris again to dismantle the stand we had there and bring it "home".

Never saw one cop car or anyone being pulled over by an unmarked car anywhere on the A1/E19/E17 on the way down or back, same as last week. TomTom kept whining about speed cameras, which were nowhere to be seen as we never saw any "flashes" with any of the people that whizzed past us. In fact, the only police seen were the two "smurfs" (motorbike cops) that pulled me over in the middle of Brasschaat, België, for a "routine control" after I had done Paris-Brasschaat in slightly over 4h30m in a 3.5T wagon and was currently doing 30kph in a 50 zone as I was slowing for traffic lights...... :ugh:


Lon

Indeed, and it's the same here. Get pulled for "excessive" speeding and you instantly say goodbye to your licence for anything for a few days to "when someone decides you can have it back". Doesn't stop people behaving like idiots and doing 120 in a 50 zone though.

ross_M
14th Sep 2011, 19:04
Fellatio?? Illegal??


Yes. And adultery too in some American states.

ChrisVJ
14th Sep 2011, 19:06
TTNav

Of course you know it isn't about sympathy, or lack of it. It is about authority taking the law and manipulating it . I find that particularly frightening when they do it to serve a PR purpose. Easy to use twist civil law to gain kudos by grabbing the cars of young road hooligans or a single wealthy foreigner who doesn't conform to "our standards," but it is still subverting the law. It is just plain wrong and specially heinous when done by the state.

"First they came for . . . . . ."

Maybe you or I will be next.

ross_M
14th Sep 2011, 19:08
In fact, the only police seen were the two "smurfs" (motorbike cops) that pulled me over in the middle of Brasschaat, België, for a "routine control"

WTF is a "routine control" traffic stop? Don't they need probable cause? Or is that another American fad.

ross_M
14th Sep 2011, 19:16
...actually the above is a total fiction, but I wonder why it would be shocking for a contributor on here to admit to being a petty thief, but consistent breaking of the speed limits is almost a badge of honour worn by some motorists.

I consider laws to fall into two buckets: If you saw a random person speed 10 above the limit would you snitch on him? Ergo, say you saw a drunk guy take a leak at a hedge. Or some kids make donuts in a parking lot.

There's this whole bucket of laws that exist but people would cringe at reporting someone for violating them..........

Lon More
14th Sep 2011, 19:17
Don't they need probable cause?

No, if they dig deep enough they will find something.

hellsbrink
14th Sep 2011, 19:18
"Routine control" is also known as a "fishing expedition" to find those with no licences/insurance/etc and to see if you are carrying anything illegal. Quite a few people have been caught out recently, especially towing trailers when they don't have a "B/E" licence. Of course, they were stupid as they asked if it was my wagon when it had "Dockx Rental" in huge letters on the side so of course all the paperwork was in order. Only took a few minutes, but it was unnecessary.

Or, of course, they were just bored and wanted to have a chat.

OFSO
14th Sep 2011, 19:50
WTF is a "routine control" traffic stop? Don't they need probable cause? Or is that another American fad.

Routine traffic stop: two motorcycle cops this morning either end of the fast section to Empuriabrava, pulling over anyone they fancied.

Routine traffic stop: last month, stopping every SWV (Small White Van) heading into Roses town, checking for fake clothing (Amani, Gucci, Boss etc) being delivered to market stalls. Thousands of items siezed over two week period, hundreds of fines for trademark infringement.

Routine traffic stop: earlier this year, three times between Perpignan and Empuriabrava after midnight, checks for driving licence/insurance - although interestingly upon seeing Mr OFSO driving, garbed in suit and tie, and obviously of N. European origin, just waved through.

Routine controls of traffic are a fact of life here: from one or two cops on their motorbikes and a friendly smile to twenty grim-faced men in riot armour with spiked chains and armed with Heckler and Koch automatic weapons and shotguns, looking for terrorists.

Tankertrashnav
14th Sep 2011, 20:59
I consider laws to fall into two buckets: If you saw a random person speed 10 above the limit would you snitch on him? Ergo, say you saw a drunk guy take a leak at a hedge. Or some kids make donuts in a parking lot.




No, I wouldnt snitch on the speeding guy, or the hedge irrigator - crimes I have certainly committed myself. My point is, your bucket and my bucket probably contain some similarities and some differences, which is why we have legislation in the first place. As members of democracies we all sign up to the idea that we abide by the law. We may think some are stupid, but we shouldnt complain if we knowingly break them and incur the consequences.

Oh btw, those little ba****ds making doughnuts? I'd throw the book at 'em. Can't stand doughnuts :yuk:

mixture
14th Sep 2011, 21:59
As members of democracies we all sign up to the idea that we abide by the law. We may think some are stupid, but we shouldnt complain if we knowingly break them and incur the consequences.

Indeed. And in some cases it may act in your favour to obide by the law.

Case in point, a couple of years back, I went on a bit of a shopping spree for various gadgets. Combined with a shopping list for friends, I ended up spending a reasonable sum of money.

Upon returning home, there was little question I was over the customs limit. So, as you know there's the choice to "declare" or "not declare".

I contemplated whilst awaiting my bags on the carousel, and decided the right thing to do would be to "declare" and save any potential risk (and cost) of embarrassment (however low that may be perceived to be).

Customs official was so pleased that I did the right thing that he simply got out his official form, asked me for a verbal declaration of what was in there and a rough quantity .... then looked at me and said "Shall we say X and get it over with".

Didn't take an einstein to work out that the value of X was, shall we say, generous, and certainly well below the "official" value. So a very small amount of cash was duly handed over, he signed off the paperwork, gave me a copy (and an official receipt for the exact value of cash... before your dark minds start making accusations of brown envelopes, it was all above board ) and I was off on my merry way.

Matari
15th Sep 2011, 00:21
Another big exception to con-pilot's "9 mph over" rule would be in school zones. Here school zones have 20mph limits, and the cops are very strict, and fines are much higher. Rightfully so.

con-pilot
15th Sep 2011, 00:59
Another big exception to con-pilot's "9 mph over" rule would be in school zones. Here school zones have 20mph limits, and the cops are very strict, and fines are much higher. Rightfully so.

Quite right, but I was addressing Interstate and intra-state highways. School zones and urban streets are a entirely different matter. Here all traffic fines are doubled in school zones.

hellsbrink
15th Sep 2011, 05:19
Here all traffic fines are doubled in school zones.

And so they should be, but the extra restrictions should not apply outside of the hours the school is in operation.

ross_M
15th Sep 2011, 06:04
Didn't take an einstein to work out that the value of X was, shall we say, generous, and certainly well below the "official" value. So a very small amount of cash was duly handed over, he signed off the paperwork, gave me a copy (and an official receipt for the exact value of cash... before your dark minds start making accusations of brown envelopes, it was all above board ) and I was off on my merry way.

Isn't that just lip service to the law? The exchequer got a raw deal anyways.

Well, not that I care. But I hate people getting all morally uppity on me because I "break the law" driving 5 above the limit.

crippen
15th Sep 2011, 07:27
On 18 December 2007, Hamilton was suspended from driving in France for a month after being caught speeding at 196 km/h (122 mph) on a French motorway. His Mercedes-Benz CLK was also impounded.

Lewis Hamilton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Hamilton)

OFSO
15th Sep 2011, 07:42
Just off up and down over the mountains this morning to do some shopping in France. I'll keep an eye on the known radar traps to see if any signs have been removed.

Al Fakhem
15th Sep 2011, 08:11
I have no issue with French (or Swiss or whatever) cops clamping down. The limits are general knowledge, so there is no question of ignorance involved.

I'd even be grateful if the cops in the UK came down very hard on the numerous idiots who drive in bad weather without lights.

osmosis
15th Sep 2011, 08:13
In the land culture forgot, recently introduced hoon laws have created a new money spinner. Initially introduced as a form of deterrent (I believe for the younger migrant population, let's face it) cars can be confiscated for 1-30 days for various breaches of newly enforced restrictions, typically speeding 30k over the limit, breaking traction and illegal vehicle modification. The impounded vehicles require a hefty fee to be retrieved but not after tow truck drivers, storage yards and who knows who else get their cut.

Recently, a father of four driving his family to a country social tennis meet, drove through abandoned roadwork signs on the little used road running past his farm at normal road speed. These roads may carry 10 vehicles a day and a non-local police officer was waiting and nabbed the driver under the newly introduced hoon laws; greater than 30k over the 40k signed limit. Further, the entire family, one of them very young, was forced to abandon the car and had to choose between a long walk home or to the nearest town 15km away, in 41deg heat. I spoke with this person some weeks ago and to say he is bitter is an understatement and no bloody wonder. He was heavily fined, lost his license for four months, had to pay to get his car back and had to arrange people to transport his farm machinery; there are few travel options living in rural Oz. Word soon spread and the actions of Constable Fuknuckle reduced the only social outlet for the surrounding farming community to a cursory dribble.

These stupid laws were created for the bloody hoons the authorities won't control, not the mums and dads going to family outings and moving farm machinery around. Why is it always the soft targets that suffer most?

Rant over.

TWT
15th Sep 2011, 10:34
And Lewis Hamilton was done in Melbourne for 'hooning' too

Lewis Hamilton charged after hoon driving | Herald Sun (http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/lewis-hamilton-charged-after-hoon-driving/story-e6frf7jo-1225869991938)

sitigeltfel
15th Sep 2011, 10:55
On the days before and after the Le Mans 24hrs race, the Gendarmes on the A16 and A28 motorways are very disappointed if they cannot lift over 250,000 euros from miscreants. Brits and Belgians seem to be the worst offenders. They draft reinforcements in from other areas to help them cope.

Lon More
15th Sep 2011, 11:16
The local police regard the day s before and after the Dutch Moto GP at Assen as Christmas come early.
Speeding, loud pipes, illegal mods, possesion of marijuana. It all helps to swell their pots.


Thread drift; It's the done thing here to set off fireworks at New Year although what is allowed is strictly controlled. Local Chinese manage to get hold of a large amount of spectacular, highly illegal, fireworks and normally have the best show. Plod here confiscated a large, cell full amount, a couple of years ago and that year the cops' display was the best.

OFSO
15th Sep 2011, 15:57
Passed three fixed radar traps on the way to Perpinyá and back today: all had the usual warning notices 500 and 50 metres before you reach them. Hence cannot agree warning signs have been taken down.

Traffic murderous BTW; all the wrinkleys out on the roads now school hols ended.

glad rag
15th Sep 2011, 16:51
Good read

Another speeding in France thread........ (http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&f=10&t=1038876&mid=17220&i=0&nmt=Another+speeding+in+France+thread%2E%2E%2E%2E%2E%2E%2E%2 E&mid=17220)

TurboTomato
15th Sep 2011, 17:28
Friend and I were lucky a few years back. Making good progress back towards Calais from the Monaco GP in 2004, he was driving my car when we went past a (moving) gendarme van at about 175km/h (they're not well marked and by the time we worked out what it was we were well past it). Duly pulled over but just told to watch our speed and be on our way.

I know some who had their licence removed and banned on the spot for 120 in a 50 and stories of those on the way to Le Mans being frog-marched (forgive the pun) to cash points with massive fines and cars being impounded. Having said that, knowing the behaviour on the way from Calais to Le Mans, they would have been massively over the speed limit.

OFSO
15th Sep 2011, 17:39
Drive through an Italian village or small town in something red and made in Modena, and the locals stand and cheer, including the police. And if it's old as well, even better.

Another reason to live in Italy !

CelticRambler
15th Sep 2011, 22:07
There are more stringent rules, more severe penalties for exceeding 55kmh in a 50kmh zone in France (55 because you get a 10% allowance) than a proportional excess in the 70+ zones. Remembering that 50kmh is the equivalent of the UK's 30mph, the rationale is that it's (probably) a built-up area and may have irrational humans unexpectedly spring out from the shadows into your route. Don't forget, France had one of the worst death tolls for European road accidents. Between the enforcement of seat-belt, drink-driving and speeding laws, they've got that down to about half the level it was five years ago.

AlpineSkier
20th Mar 2012, 09:58
Just a late addendum to this old thread.

Faverges | Un motard savoyard contrôlé à 201 km/h au lieu de 110 (http://www.ledauphine.com/haute-savoie/2012/03/19/un-motard-controle-a-201-km-h-au-lieu-de-110)

French biker caught doing 201 kph in 110 limit.

Article says that apart from immediate seizure of licence, the bike was impounded and may* be sold at auction ( * encompasses both meanings of may )

Really seems that it is very much down to the gendarmes ( who do the immediate seizure ) and the judge, how much they feel the motorist has been taking the piss.

Also announces the arrival of good weather when the bikers come out like the early migratory birds and also the hardy souls on bikes testing their legs against the 1900 m height gain over 32 km up the valley.

Maybe I should think about that one of these days ........................... but perhaps not just at the moment as I really, really, really do have a fractured ankle .

OFSO
20th Mar 2012, 12:14
Drove up to Carcassonne and back last weekend, biggest problem was locals driving incredibly slowly - 60kph in 90kph zone - taking what seemed like hours to engage first gear after traffic lights changed, stopping in middle of road for no reason, etc. Regular users of this route (D-117 and D-118) know where fixed and mobile radars are, so why ?

Vercingetorix
20th Mar 2012, 12:59
AlpineSkier

un-motard-controle-a-201-km-h-au-lieu-de-110

That's a bummer. I used to do similar on that road. Last major infringement was inbound Dubai on the Shk Zayed highway where I got clocked at 178 Kph by a hidden camera. Fine was DH200 (approx £30). Car was a Dodge Charger 5.7 Ltr.
The speed cameras are positioned every 7.5 Kms and the locals drive at any speed they fancy between the cameras.:(

AlpineSkier
20th Mar 2012, 17:04
@Vercingetorix

The gendarmes are particularly targetting bikes because with the steady decline in road-deaths ( -26% Feb 12 vs Feb 11, ) bike-deaths are staying stubbornly high and looking very obvious.

This is probably why permanent head-lights and fluo' vests are being suggested/possibly about to be made compulsory for bikers.

Have to say though, that being so far over the top is bloody dangerous as other people will not see the bike in the mirror and then it will be rammed into the rear bumper half-way through your overtaking manoeuvre.

sitigeltfel
20th Mar 2012, 17:54
This is probably why permanent head-lights and fluo' vests are being suggested/possibly about to be made compulsory for bikers.
Upset bikers and the "Périphérique" grinds to a halt. Thats what happened when they talked about banning the lane 2/3 overtaking manoeuvre.

Loose rivets
20th Mar 2012, 21:42
Even as a keen biker - well, until I was in my 50s - I really get pi-sed orf about that FULL headlight thing.

WE'RE MOTORCYCLISTS, GET OUT OF OUR FARKIN' WAY!

No you're not, you're gormless twats who think burning motorist's eyes out is normal. If you are totally incapable of reading motorist's intentions - or potential mistakes, have them on, but DIP THE FARKIN' THINGS!


Ooo . . . that feels better.:*

Vercingetorix
21st Mar 2012, 08:57
Loose rivets
all the serious bikers (1000 cc+) in France normally drive with their headlights on as a means to say "HELLO, we're here and vulnerable" to the average car driver not to say WE'RE MOTORCYCLISTS, GET OUT OF OUR FARKIN' WAY!

Most car driverers are clueless when it comes to either seeing motorcyclists or judging motorcyclists speed and postion.

Now't beats the thrill of high speed on a bike except for downhill Ski racing.

:uhoh:

AlpineSkier
Not sure about the use of Flo vests in daylight but good luck with the fractured ankle.

Cheers:ok:

vulcanised
21st Mar 2012, 13:51
I think LR's main point was about use of main beam vs, dipped beam.

Quite agree with his point, especially on wet days.

Victor Inox
22nd Mar 2012, 09:05
There seems to be a significant discrepancy between the harsh brutality of the Gendarmerie Nationale as reported by so many Ppruners in this thread and the softly, softly approach to the Toulouse terrorist. I would have thought they'd given him at least a dozen lead piercings by now.

AlpineSkier
22nd Mar 2012, 14:22
@Victor Inox

No sooner said than done, although it was in response to his retaliation.

The news said that the firefight lasted four minutes and more than 300 shots were fired: I have no military experience but that seems amazing to me. Don't understand why they didn't start with a few flash-bangs which, from what i read, should have incapacitated him .

Victor Inox
22nd Mar 2012, 16:39
Alpine Skier:

I do have a military background, and it amazes me how a simple ordnance issue can spin out into a 30+ hour standoff.

G-CPTN
22nd Mar 2012, 18:42
I guess that, being Police (rather than military), they would be on overtime?

sled dog
22nd Mar 2012, 20:54
Erh, what have the previous 4 posts got to do with speeding in France :ugh:

Victor Inox
23rd Mar 2012, 08:44
Erh, what have the previous 4 posts got to do with speeding in France

Mohammed Mehra was a self-confessed French speed freak.

hellsbrink
23rd Mar 2012, 19:24
Really? And here was me thinking that "good" Muslims never did drugs......

Victor Inox
24th Mar 2012, 18:32
Really? And here was me thinking that "good" Muslims never did drugs.....

The good people of Afghanistan, who are neither Christian, Buddhist, Hindu nor Jewish, are among the world's largest purveyors of opium.

sitigeltfel
19th Apr 2012, 08:01
Someone has a sense of humour...
Speeding drivers in a town in North West France have been met with English insults as they pass a speed check.
Drivers passing the camera in the town of Eaucourt-sur-Somme at over 50 km/h saw “F*ck you” flash up on the screen.
But the monitor was as courteous as it was rude – those going below the limit were greeted with “welcome to Moulin”.
The company that supplied the speed monitor, JCB, have apologised for the message, which could be seen for several days, claiming a “practical joker” was behind it.
JCB boss Jean Claude Bouton said a contractor had changed the text during testing to prove the text on the monitor was too small, but forgot to change it back after.
“I sincerely apologise, but that’s all I can do because the damage has been done,” said Mr Bouton.
:= :D