PDA

View Full Version : Forth Bridge painting complete


Loki
7th Sep 2011, 21:17
However.....this sounds awfully familiar

We’re not sure about the Forth Bridge colour, say Scottish women (http://newsthump.com/2011/09/06/were-not-sure-about-the-forth-bridge-colour-say-scottish-women/)

11Fan
7th Sep 2011, 21:21
What happened to the first tree?

Arm out the window
7th Sep 2011, 22:03
That is one ugly piece of engineering, never mind the colour.

Forth, though ... that reminds me of a riddle:

Q. When was car racing first mentioned in the Bible?
A. When Moses came forth in his triumph.

Boom boom!

Um... lifting...
7th Sep 2011, 22:22
A. When Moses came forth in his triumph.

Clears up why it took him 40 years to lead the Israelites out of the desert.:rolleyes:

BrATCO
7th Sep 2011, 22:36
Who's on Forth base for the Firth time !
Moses seconds him on third...

11Fan
8th Sep 2011, 00:11
Clears up why it took him 40 years to lead the Israelites out of the desert.

Well, it took a while because "they were all in one Accord.'

Acts 2:1

http://hondaaccords.info/images/honda-accord-1.jpg

B Fraser
8th Sep 2011, 06:22
That is one ugly piece of engineering, never mind the colour

Mr Arm sir,

Compared to the coat hanger that sits astride Sydney Harbour (no doubt making Admiral Draper feel at home while visiting the colonies), the big bridge is a work of pure inspiration. If the picture below doesn't stir your stuff then your stuff simply isn't working. Don't get me wrong, I love Oz and I like your bridge but I am worried that your parents never let you play with meccano.

http://images.travelpod.co.uk/users/justinrowe/3.1230656400.forth-bridge.jpg

I still think they should have a roller coaster that runs along the top ;)

tony draper
8th Sep 2011, 06:33
Indeed Mr Fraser we had engineering giants walking among us in those days,built at a time the rest of the world were paddling across rivers hanging onto inflated goat skins.
:rolleyes:

Arm out the window
8th Sep 2011, 06:40
Beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder then - no disrespect to your good selves, but that thing looks like a great meccano boa constrictor that's swallowed three goats!

My 'stuff' is more stirred by sweeping curves, and I don't mind a lump of the right kind, but that one just doesn't do it for me, I'm afraid! :)

tony draper
8th Sep 2011, 06:45
The sweepimg curves were built a few miles down the road from me, flat packed shipped out along with the chaps from the North of England to put it together,so we could do both
:rolleyes:

sitigeltfel
8th Sep 2011, 07:26
Forth Bridge painting complete?

As we Scots like to say, Aye.... right!

radeng
8th Sep 2011, 07:50
There were a lot of constraints in the design, because apart from Inchgarvie, there wasn't really anywhere else they could use for an intermediate support. The Firth of Forth is rather deeper than the Firth of Tay, so a viaduct type structure like the Tay bridge was not on. This more or less forced them into a cantilever type structure.

It was fortunate with hindsight that Thomas Bouch's design wasn't used, as he was a bit poor on calculating the effects of wind, as was shown on December 31st, 1879 when the Tay bridge came down. Yet his great viaducts on the line over the Pennines stood well, (e.g. Belah) but the prevailing winds tended to blow along them and not transversely. And they didn't use cast iron, or Hopkins, Gilkes and Company (a dubious Geordie firm!) to build them,

stuckgear
8th Sep 2011, 07:57
The sweepimg curves were built a few miles down the road from me, flat packed shipped out along with the chaps from the North of England to put it together,

with or without a crappy allen key and some extra screws ?

sisemen
8th Sep 2011, 09:41
Firth of Forth - wonderful alliteration.

Reminds me of the time many, many years when listening to the football scores on the wireless when the following score was read out:

Forfar, five, Fife, four

MagnusP
8th Sep 2011, 09:51
Was it not "East Fife five, Forfar four"? :p

Lon More
8th Sep 2011, 11:36
It's worth remembering that the Forth Bridge was originally designed by an Englishman, Sir Thomas Bouch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tay_Bridge_disaster)


BTW Scotland also has the honour of having the only football team mentioned in the Bible; Queen of the South.

Dan Gerous
8th Sep 2011, 11:56
BF, when I was a wee lad I thought the trains did indeed go up and down the outside of the bridge, my dad did nothing to dispel that thought, and I spent a long time waiting to see a train go over the bridge before I eventually saw one actually crossing the bridge. What a disapointment.

On the other hand, I'm glad the painting is finished. I have hated looking at the bridge while it is being painted, as it has had sections covered in scaffolding and enclosed in white plastic sheeting that eventually turned red with paint. It is a bit of a tourist attraction, and I have truly felt sorry for anyone who has traveled specifically to see the bridge, only to see it covered in plastic sheeting.

corsair
8th Sep 2011, 12:06
The is more than an element of truth in the article. My wife had me paint the bathroom light blue. As I proudly showed her my work, she sniffed. It's not right. So I had to paint it again a very slightly lighter blue. Perfect this time!

You'd be hard pushed to tell the difference.

radeng
8th Sep 2011, 12:13
Sorry, Lon, it certainly wasn't.

Bouch designed a bridge to go across the Forth, but after the disastrous failure of the Tay bridge, designed by him, in 1879, the design was abandoned. He did invent the train ferry that was used before the bridge was built.

The bridge was designed by Fowler and Baker, and opened in 1890. It was a factor in ensuring that the North British Railway had a virtual monopoly of the Fife coalfield.

Inspection a few years back showed that Railtrack had been somewhat lacking in maintenance of it.

An assessment by HSE of the structural integrity of the Forth Rail Bridge :: The Railways Archive (http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/docsummary.php?docID=2107)

Storminnorm
8th Sep 2011, 13:27
Lovely to see that they've finished the Forth Bridge.
When do they start on the Fifth one?

Lon More
8th Sep 2011, 13:45
Radeng I should have worded that as "the original .... " . Bouch got as far as the laying of the foundation stone before he was stopped

FWIW, Fifers were invited to contribute to its build. Being a canny lot there were not that many prepared to di into their pockets and in fact Dunfermline made no contribution at all. When the Bridge opened in retaliation a ticket to Dunfermline was more expensive than one to Halbeath or Cowdenbeath further down the line.

MagnusP
8th Sep 2011, 13:58
Wonder if there's any plan to run trams over the new Forth crossing....

sisemen
8th Sep 2011, 14:05
Anyway, what's with the finished bit? I thought that it was always the case that as soon as the painters got to one end they went back to the other and started again. It was always a continuous process.

Storminnorm
8th Sep 2011, 14:08
They finally got some "Everlasting" paint.
They reckon they won't have to paint it again.

The fools!!

G-CPTN
8th Sep 2011, 16:24
The 'coating' (developed for North Sea oilrigs) is thought to be durable 'for 25 years'
- though they hope that it was last longer in the less harsh environment.

Just think about all those who have enjoyed a lifetime of work as painters, soon to be made redundant . . .

sitigeltfel
8th Sep 2011, 16:50
In the olden days it used to be a tradition to throw a copper coin out from the carriage window, when crossing the bridge, for luck. When painters heard a train coming they would all run for cover.

Must have been a Sassenach invention as you wouldn't catch a canny Scot throwing money away ;)

flying lid
8th Sep 2011, 17:03
Another great old bridge, still in daily use. Saltash, linking Devon & Cornwall.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3257/2864722787_7d1c980781.jpg

IK BRUNEL ENGINEER - We'll never see the likes of him again, unfortunately.

Lid

G-CPTN
8th Sep 2011, 17:10
I wonder what the likes of Brunel thought when asked to construct bridges for the new-fangled 'railway'.

I say new-fangled because it was a relatively recent invention (and before the age of the motor car - and the aeroplane). Who knew what the following decades might bring - so did they design for a century hence?

Who today could predict what transport will be like in a hundred years time?

What machines are still in daily use that are a hundred (and more) years old?

tony draper
8th Sep 2011, 18:08
There was a interesting documentary on telly a couple of years back about how long the works of mankind would remain visible should all we hairless talking monkeys suddenly disappear, the conclusion was not very long in the timescale mother earth measures things,think we had a thread about it.
We have a number of bowling greens in me park they have been lovingly tended mowed and rolled for over a hundred years,for some reason one was abandoned and allowed to return to the jungle, it was surprising how quickly mummy nature took back possession,after a couple of years or three apart from the regular outline it looked like a patch of untouched wild valley bottom.
:uhoh:

flying lid
8th Sep 2011, 18:58
I wonder what the likes of Brunel thought when asked to construct bridges for the new-fangled 'railway'

Well, Brunel actually designed & built the railway, The Great Western.
He also designed a series of steamships, including the first propeller-driven transatlantic steamship; and numerous important bridges and tunnels.

What machines are still in daily use that are a hundred (and more) years old?

Quite a few in UK actually. Preserved steam locomotives.

KWVR - Vintage Trains (http://www.kwvr.co.uk/news/latest/507-vintage-trains-vintage-buses-a-cream-teas.html)

No. 1 'Talyllyn' | Talyllyn Railway (http://www.talyllyn.co.uk/details/no-1)

Thing is the Victorians built everything as strong / robust as possible, and with pride. Both are qualities missing today.

Lid

rgbrock1
8th Sep 2011, 19:03
11Fan wrote:

Well, it took a while because "they were all in one Accord.'

Well, the Accord is nice but I much prefer the Civic. Gas mileage-wise anyway!!!!!

tony draper
8th Sep 2011, 19:06
I'm still using me great granddads mash hammer,only had one new head and two new shafts in all those years.
:)

Rollingthunder
8th Sep 2011, 19:12
When they finish painting the Golden Gate - they pretty much start painting it again.

tony draper
8th Sep 2011, 19:30
I worked with a chap who had a brother who was a bit of a wastrel,couldn't hold down a job for more than a couple of days,so through a mutual friend he gets him a job with a painting company,they did rough painting in the ship yards industrial sites ect,toshing I think it's called.
First day they drive to Swan Hunters and he see all the blokes get out the van and start getting into their kit,so he asks the boss what they are painting,the boss points up at one of the giant hammer head cranes a 100 feet overhead,
"Shouldn't we wait for the blokes who are coming to take it down" he says to the boss.
:uhoh::rolleyes:

Lon More
8th Sep 2011, 19:57
Wonder if there's any plan to run trams over the new Forth crossing....

I thought that , or a light rail link, was the original plan? Complete with a Kelty Clippie.

handsfree
8th Sep 2011, 20:26
That is one ugly piece of engineering, never mind the colour.

Mr Arm wash your mouth out with soap.
It is a truly beautiful engineering structure.
Seen in a light autumn mist it is nirvana to the soul.

:=

Storminnorm
9th Sep 2011, 15:49
It must cost an awful lot for the Gilt foil to cover the
Golden Gate bridge.

B Fraser
9th Sep 2011, 16:04
On October 16th 1939, the sausage noshers tried to bomb the bridge but managed to miss it completely. It was the first attack on the UK mainland of WW2 however they encountered a bunch of Glaswegians in Spitfires who downed a couple of Junkers 88s. Adolf should have taken a hint there and then.