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arcniz
18th Aug 2011, 13:39
Genie's just got itself another toe out of the bottle.... a milestone of no small significance, one senses.

http://www.alz.org/brain/images/05a.jpg

ARMONK, N.Y., - 18 Aug 2011: Today, IBM (NYSE: IBM) researchers unveiled a new generation of experimental computer chips designed to emulate the brain’s abilities for perception, action and cognition. The technology could yield many orders of magnitude less power consumption and space than used in today’s computers.

In a sharp departure from traditional concepts in designing and building computers, IBM’s first neurosynaptic computing chips recreate the phenomena between spiking neurons and synapses in biological systems, such as the brain, through advanced algorithms and silicon circuitry. Its first two prototype chips have already been fabricated and are currently undergoing testing.

Called cognitive computers, systems built with these chips won’t be programmed the same way traditional computers are today. Rather, cognitive computers are expected to learn through experiences, find correlations, create hypotheses, and remember – and learn from – the outcomes, mimicking the brains structural and synaptic plasticity.

To do this, IBM is combining principles from nanoscience, neuroscience and supercomputing as part of a multi-year cognitive computing initiative. The company and its university collaborators also announced they have been awarded approximately $21 million in new funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for Phase 2 of the Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) project.

The goal of SyNAPSE is to create a system that not only analyzes complex information from multiple sensory modalities at once, but also dynamically rewires itself as it interacts with its environment – all while rivaling the brain’s compact size and low power usage. The IBM team has already successfully completed Phases 0 and 1.

“This is a major initiative to move beyond the von Neumann paradigm that has been ruling computer architecture for more than half a century,” said Dharmendra Modha, project leader for IBM Research. “Future applications of computing will increasingly demand functionality that is not efficiently delivered by the traditional architecture. These chips are another significant step in the evolution of computers from calculators to learning systems, signaling the beginning of a new generation of computers and their applications in business, science and government.”

Neurosynaptic Chips

While they contain no biological elements, IBM’s first cognitive computing prototype chips use digital silicon circuits inspired by neurobiology to make up what is referred to as a “neurosynaptic core” with integrated memory (replicated synapses), computation (replicated neurons) and communication (replicated axons).

IBM has two working prototype designs. Both cores were fabricated in 45 nm SOI-CMOS and contain 256 neurons. One core contains 262,144 programmable synapses and the other contains 65,536 learning synapses. The IBM team has successfully demonstrated simple applications like navigation, machine vision, pattern recognition, associative memory and classification.

IBM’s overarching cognitive computing architecture is an on-chip network of light-weight cores, creating a single integrated system of hardware and software. This architecture represents a critical shift away from traditional von Neumann computing to a potentially more power-efficient architecture that has no set programming, integrates memory with processor, and mimics the brain’s event-driven, distributed and parallel processing.

IBM’s long-term goal is to build a chip system with ten billion neurons and hundred trillion synapses, while consuming merely one kilowatt of power and occupying less than two liters of volume.

Why Cognitive Computing

Future chips will be able to ingest information from complex, real-world environments through multiple sensory modes and act through multiple motor modes in a coordinated, context-dependent manner.

For example, a cognitive computing system monitoring the world's water supply could contain a network of sensors and actuators that constantly record and report metrics such as temperature, pressure, wave height, acoustics and ocean tide, and issue tsunami warnings based on its decision making. Similarly, a grocer stocking shelves could use an instrumented glove that monitors sights, smells, texture and temperature to flag bad or contaminated produce. Making sense of real-time input flowing at an ever-dizzying rate would be a Herculean task for today’s computers, but would be natural for a brain-inspired system.

“Imagine traffic lights that can integrate sights, sounds and smells and flag unsafe intersections before disaster happens or imagine cognitive co-processors that turn servers, laptops, tablets, and phones into machines that can interact better with their environments,” said Dr. Modha.

For Phase 2 of SyNAPSE, IBM has assembled a world-class multi-dimensional team of researchers and collaborators to achieve these ambitious goals. The team includes Columbia University; Cornell University; University of California, Merced; and University of Wisconsin, Madison.

IBM has a rich history in the area of artificial intelligence research going all the way back to 1956 when IBM performed the world's first large-scale (512 neuron) cortical simulation. Most recently, IBM Research scientists created Watson, an analytical computing system that specializes in understanding natural human language and provides specific answers to complex questions at rapid speeds. Watson represents a tremendous breakthrough in computers understanding natural language, “real language” that is not specially designed or encoded just for computers, but language that humans use to naturally capture and communicate knowledge.

IBM’s cognitive computing chips were built at its highly advanced chip-making facility in Fishkill, N.Y. and are currently being tested at its research labs in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. and San Jose, Calif.

For more information about IBM Research, please visit ibm.com/research.

Loose rivets
18th Aug 2011, 13:52
I Robert:p

Cacophonix
18th Aug 2011, 14:03
Nueral nets on a chip.

Akin, in some sense to fuzzy logic. When they are able to mimic the way a woman thinks then I will really be impressed. ;)

Fuzzy Logic Tutorial - An Introduction (http://www.seattlerobotics.org/encoder/mar98/fuz/flindex.html)

Caco

larssnowpharter
18th Aug 2011, 14:13
Cogo

Cogito.

Fer goodness sake! :ugh::ugh::ugh:

Pprune grammar police

Cacophonix
18th Aug 2011, 14:24
Poor old Descartes eh!

Some other derivations

Congo ego square (for New Orleans Jazz and blues fans)....

Conga she don't care (Crazy woman dancer)....

I'll shut up and take my coat...:uhoh:

OFSO
18th Aug 2011, 14:27
When they are able to mimic the way a woman thinks then I will really be impressed.

Go and visit Friday Jokes !

Cacophonix
18th Aug 2011, 14:52
OFSO

;).... (there PPRune I have extended my message).

OFSO
18th Aug 2011, 14:56
Anyone interested in this should read Scalzi's scifi epic "Old Man's War". The idea of having a PDA grown in one's own body has certain attractions, like Jet Blast on tap WITH NO INTERRUPTIONS LIKE THIS WEEK !

Storminnorm
18th Aug 2011, 15:41
WHOOPS! Sorry. I thought it said CARGO ergo sum!!!

arcniz
18th Aug 2011, 15:52
Cogito. :ugh::D:ugh:

Fer goodness sake!

Thanks, larssnowpharter.

You can see why one eagerly awaits for some reinforcements to augment the current lot.




neural nets on a chip...

Cacophonix - not no numty neural nets-- Intel did that on a chip 20+ years ago. This generation is purported to be much closer to the real deal, mimicking proper pulsatory synapses -- fundamentally non-deterministic in style, mode, and function, scalable, and super-dense. (as now am I with the Latin).

Mr Grimsdale
18th Aug 2011, 16:00
When they are able to mimic the way a woman thinks then I will really be impressed.

Have you never used Windows?
Crash!;)

arcniz
18th Aug 2011, 16:10
Why do more of that part, anyway?

Storminnorm
18th Aug 2011, 16:21
I used to think that a Synaptic Cavity was a sort of Night Club with
loud music.

Cacophonix
18th Aug 2011, 20:30
fundamentally non-deterministic in style, mode, and function, scalable, and super-dense.

I am now genuinely intrigued Arcniz. Excuse my initial air of ennui, a sign of becoming old in my case and a lack of cocoa.

I suppose I gave up on AI after Bolt, Baranek and Newman so singularly failed to deliver (but in such an interesting way) and I really should attend. Thanks for posting the link.

Caco

Mike X
18th Aug 2011, 20:45
All we need. More crap in, crap out.

If the scientific intellectuals need to project, I also want a grant.

Cacophonix
18th Aug 2011, 21:00
Come on MikeX

The scientific intellectuals, as you call them, made this damned silly thread possible!

Where is Steve Wozniak when you need him? ;)

Caco

Mike X
18th Aug 2011, 21:13
Bonsoir Caco.

Who believes in this crap, like living on other planets ?

Simply put (yea), why would we wish to create (sic) something that cannot equal us.

To me, it's just obvious that there are many who earn their living by bullshitting funders.

Cacophonix
18th Aug 2011, 21:28
Bonsoir MikeX

As you say science isn't really all about science. It is mostly about money (a bit like my ex wife really)!

Still, this stuff does help out. Arpanet (as you clearly know) made the internet possible and the geeks who did that all come out of universities vying for grants etc.

As for "better than us", well maybe we will make machines that best us. Perhaps it is for the best. ;)

http://www.aaai.org/ojs/index.php/aimagazine/article/viewFile/753/671 (http://www.aaai.org/ojs/index.php/aimagazine/article/viewFile/753/671)

Of course chess playing computers and algorithms are a far cry from what Arcniz has pointed out. I suspect we will deal with machines that are a lot smarter than us (in my case that isn't difficult).





A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
A robot must obey any orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.


Regards

Caco

Mike X
18th Aug 2011, 21:44
Caco

It can only be as good as our input.

That's damn scary !

Is there a perfect answer to 'if then do' ?

NEVER will anything artificial replace the human.

It's all about hype/marketing.

(notice no ref to aviation).

ChristiaanJ
18th Aug 2011, 22:49
Somebody else has been reading Heinlein....

Hi Mike (Holmes IV)....

CJ

ehwatezedoing
19th Aug 2011, 00:35
ARMONK, N.Y., - 18 Aug 2018: Today, IBM (SKYNET) researchers unveiled a new generation of experimental computer chips designed to emulate the brain’s abilities for perception, action and cognition..
In a sharp departure from traditional concepts in designing and building computers, SKYNET’s first neurosynaptic computing chips recreate the phenomena between spiking neurons and synapses in biological systems, such as the brain, through advanced algorithms and silicon circuitry. Its first two prototype Model T 800 have already been fabricated and are currently undergoing testing.





http://www.otherlandtoys.co.uk/terminator4_650.jpg




:uhoh:

larssnowpharter
19th Aug 2011, 02:16
This guy, Des Cartes, walks into a bar.

Barman says, "The usual, Des?"

Des replies, "I think not."

And disappears.

Mike X
19th Aug 2011, 11:57
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:

The Pythons would appreciate that one.

Mike X
19th Aug 2011, 12:12
Somebody else has been reading Heinlein....

Hi Mike (Holmes IV)....

CJ


Thank you CJ. I don't read fiction, that includes budgets !

A quick googie enlightened me as to Heinlein. And no, I'm not Sherlock's brother.

tony draper
19th Aug 2011, 12:31
Who is called Mycroft,one didn't have to google that,honest.:rolleyes:

Carry0nLuggage
19th Aug 2011, 12:39
The first task for that chip is going to be coming up with the acronym for the next research project.:rolleyes: