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punkalouver
11th Aug 2011, 11:09
What would be the reason?

Occurrence No. : A11A0042 Occurrence Type: INCIDENT REPORTABLE
Class : CLASS 5 Reportable Type: K. EMERGENCY/PRIORITY
Date : 28-07-2011 Time : 21:10 NDT
Region of Responsibility : ATLANTIC
Location : CYGR, 50 NM SE, NOVA SCOTIA


Aircraft Information:

Registration : N48127 Operator : CONTINENTAL AIRLINES
Manufacturer : BOEING Operator Type: COMMERCIAL
Model : 757-200 CARs Info: 701 - FOREIGN
Injuries: Fatal : 0 Serious : 0 Minor : 0 None : 0 Unknown : 0


Occurrence Summary :

A11A0042: The Continental Flight 74, a Boeing 757-200 (reg N48127) declared an emergency due to no on-board water. The aircraft diverted to Gander, obtained water and continued to destination.

Checkboard
11th Aug 2011, 11:28
No flush for the toilets, no hand washing. An excuse for the captain to give to the company to justify the costs of the diversion. Unknown amount of damage to the aircraft (if it left with water, and lost it, which part(s) have departed the aircraft to allow the leak?) ... take your pick.


... no tea/coffee for the crew. :{

Dream Land
11th Aug 2011, 12:12
Can definitely do damage on the Airbus using the lavs without water flow, maybe they declared the emergency due to overweight landing?

nitpicker330
11th Aug 2011, 12:24
Aircraft in "grave and imminent danger"

I don't think you have the whole story. :ugh:

BOAC
11th Aug 2011, 12:44
He probably just wanted to evacuate?

1978
11th Aug 2011, 12:44
- Would them apparently just having entered Oceanic make any difference in rules and procedures?
- What is the effect of missing 60 gallons of water near the tail (hope I am getting this right) on the centre of gravity?

M.Mouse
11th Aug 2011, 12:44
A few years ago airborne out of Shanghai bound for LHR the chief steward came on to the flight deck to tell me the water tanks were empty! He assured me he had checked the guages prior to departure. We did not have a full passenger load and decided that diversion would be costly and difficult bearing in mind we were not over the most developed part of the world.

After some discussion we decided that using bottled water for hand washing and the fact the toilets on a B777 can dry flush, albeit less efficiently than normal, we elected to continue with the option of diverting later should the situation warrant it. With the co-operation of teh passengers we made it to LHR non-stop.

I later learned from engineering that a large pipe had either fractured or come apart and that all our water was sloshing about in the belly of the aircraft so refilling after diversion would not have been to good an idea!

The full story of the case here would be interesting.

Superpilot
11th Aug 2011, 12:52
I couldn't be arsed dealing with that sh*t

captjns
11th Aug 2011, 13:01
Given the state of company/employee relations? Not a big shock.

bubbers44
11th Aug 2011, 13:02
On my 757 sim check once the check airman asked me if I took off on an 8 hr trans atlantic flight and was told on climb out that we had no water my way of handling it. I said I would return and land overweight. Then he asked if I would declare an emergency. I said no, why would I do that? He said you have to because landing overweight you have to declare an emergency.

IGh
11th Aug 2011, 14:17
Comments from a few slots earlier:
"... the water tanks were empty! ... had either fractured or come apart and that all our water was sloshing about in the belly ..."

Perrow (_Normal Accidents_, pg 135+) describes that Capital Airlines DC8 mishap, in which the PRESSURIZATION Outflow Valves became inoperative during a CRZ phase, F/E unable to control pressurization. [Potable Water Tank contents had the customary 11% freeze-expansion during winter ground-time servicing, then during crz the contents melted, this liquid then refroze around the Outflow Valves.] Pax masks dropped. With limited crew O2, captain had to divert (no pax-services for that Supplemental aircarrier). Perrow cites this as an exemplar of a complex failure interaction, that the poor operator couldn't comprehend and the designer hadn't anticipated.

Each winter, for each new generation of southerners who come into our industry, managers have to re-tell the old stories -- to explain to the Babtists why the industry prohibits departure with frozen water-system components [eg, the water line to the narrowbody forward Lav will often freeze during a ground-turn if the cargo loaders leave that Fwd Cargo Door OPEN with surface OAT cooler than about -10C or cooler than +15F].

pigboat
11th Aug 2011, 19:07
Location : CYGR, 50 NM SE, NOVA SCOTIA
Wonder why he went to Gander. At 50 SE of Grindstone his nearest airport was Sydney. :p

lomapaseo
11th Aug 2011, 19:10
Cold Wx Ops= Frozen water tank hazards
Comments from a few slots earlier:
"... the water tanks were empty! ... had either fractured or come apart and that all our water was sloshing about in the belly ..."

Perrow (_Normal Accidents_, pg 135+) describes that Capital Airlines DC8 mishap, in which the PRESSURIZATION Outflow Valves became inoperative during a CRZ phase, F/E unable to control pressurization. [Potable Water Tank contents had the customary 11% freeze-expansion during winter ground-time servicing, then during crz the contents melted, this liquid then refroze around the Outflow Valves.] Pax masks dropped. With limited crew O2, captain had to divert (no pax-services for that Supplemental aircarrier). Perrow cites this as an exemplar of a complex failure interaction, that the poor operator couldn't comprehend and the designer hadn't anticipated.

Each winter, for each new generation of southerners who come into our industry, managers have to re-tell the old stories -- to explain to the Babtists why the industry prohibits departure with frozen water-system components [eg, the water line to the narrowbody forward Lav will often freeze during a ground-turn if the cargo loaders leave that Fwd Cargo Door OPEN with surface OAT cooler than about -10C or cooler than +15F].


Tht'll teach the pilots to consider all possibilities before depating under an MEL